(navigation image)
Home American Libraries | Canadian Libraries | Universal Library | Community Texts | Project Gutenberg | Children's Library | Biodiversity Heritage Library | Additional Collections
Search: Advanced Search
Anonymous User (login or join us)
Upload
See other formats

Full text of "Catalogs"

LIBRARY 




Digitized by the Internet Archive 

in 2012 with funding from 

LYRASIS Members and Sloan Foundation 



http://archive.org/details/catalogs19241926fair 



tfl3~y 



Catalog of Fairmont 

State Normal 

School 



A Teachers' College 

FAIRMONT, WEST VIRGINIA 



for I 924 - I 925 



Catalog of Fairmont 

State Normal 

School 



A Teachers 9 College 

FAIRMONT, WEST VIRGINIA 



for I 924 - / 925 



AN EXPLANATORY FOREWORD 

Since some misunderstanding seems to prevail about 
the present status of Fairmont Normal, an explanation 
is desirable. 

The name of this school remains as it was : "Fairmont 
State Normal School"; and it will so remain until it is 
changed by act of the West Virginia legislature. But 
the school, by official act of the State Board of Educa- 
tion, has been given permission to add two years of college 
work and to grant the degree of A. B. in Education, and 
degrees were granted in June of 1924. This institution 
therefore, while a Normal School in name, is in reality 
a teachers* college. 

This change does not mean that the established normal 
courses for the training of elementary teachers will be 
eliminated; it means merely that Fairmont Normal will 
add to its established courses another course, a course to 
train supervisors and teachers for junior and senior high 
schools. 

Fairmont Normal is, therefore, still a teacher-training 
institution, not at all a general, liberal-arts college. But 
those who do not desire to teach may nevertheless attend 
the school and secure college credit for the academic work 
they take. Two or three years of college credit may thus 
be earned. 






CALENDAR FOR 1924-25 

First Semester opens September 16. 
Christmas vacation begins December 19. 
School resumes January 5. 
First Semester closes January 30. 
Second Semester opens February 2. 
Spring vacation begins April 22. 
Spring Term opens April 28. 
Commencement June 12. 
Summer Term opens June 15. 
Summer Term closes August 14. 

The regular school year is divided into two semesters 
of eighteen weeks each. But beginning on April 28 a 
special spring term of six weeks and beginning on June 
15 a special term of nine weeks are held. 



39- 



THE STATE BORD OF CONTROL 

James S. Lakin, President... Charleston 

J. Walter Barnes, Treasurer Charleston 

J. S. Darst, Member Charleston 

Roy Reger, Secretary ..Charleston 

The State Board of Control has charge of the financial 
and business affairs of all the State institutions. 

THE STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

George M. Ford, President Charleston 

L. W. Burns, Vice-President Martinsburg 

W. C. Cook Welch 

Howard M. Gore Clarksburg 

Bernard McClaugherty Bluefield 

Earle W. Oglebay Wheeling 

Mrs. Lena Lowe Yost Huntington 

J. Frank Marsh, Secretary Charleston 

The State Board of Education has charge of all matters 
of a purely scholastic nature concerning the State edu- 
cational institutions. 



FACULTY 1923-24 
Joseph Rosier ..President 

P.Pd. Salem College 1895, A.M. Salem College 1915. 
Superintendent Salem Public Schools 1891-1893 ; City 
Superintendent Salem Public Schools 1891-1893 ; 
County Superintendent Harrison County schools 1893- 
1896 ; instructor Glenville State Normal school 1895- 
1896; instructor in Fairmont State Normal School 1896- 
1900 ; Superintendent City Schools of Fairmont 1900- 
1916 ; present position 1915. 

Walter BARNES....Dean of Instruction, Head English Dept. 

A.B. West Virginia University 1905, A.M. Harvard 1911. 
Four years in rural and village schools, principal 
Keyser High School 1906-1906 ; superintendent Salem 
public schools 1906-1907 ; assistant principal and head 
of English Department Glenville State Normal School, 
1907-1914 ; assistant to the president and head of the 
English Department Fairmont State Normal School, 
1914 ; dean of the college 1923 ; instructor in sum- 
mer schools West Virginia University, 1914, 1915, 
1917 ; in State Normal School at Towson, Maryland, 
1916 ; University of Pittsburgh, 1918, at University of 
Pennsylvania, 1920-1921; at Chicago University 1922; 
present position 1914. 

Laura E. Briggs AH 

Student at Ferris Institute, Big Rapids Michigan; 
State Normal, Kalamazoo, Michigan ; University (sum- 
mer) Ann Arbor, Michigan ; Art Institute (summer) 
Chicago, 111.; Columbia (summer) New York City; 
six years supervisor Music and Drawing, seven years 
Supervisor Art, Fairmont High School ; present posi- 
tion 1918. 

Eva Day Compton ; Home Economics 

B.S. West Virginia University 1919; Piedmont High 
School one year; Keyser High School three years; 
present position 1921. 

♦Virginia Gaskill ...Home Economics 

A.B. Household Arts Diploma Mechanics Institute 1916 ; 
Fairmont High School 1916-19 ; instructor in summer 

school Concord Normal 1917-1918 ; present position 

1919. 

* On leave of absence 1923-25. 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



Blanche Gibson Education; Hostess at Woman's Hall 

A.B. West Virginia University ; taught eighteen years ; 
present position 1921. 

Ione Hall Music 

Student at West Virginia University 1919 ; Music 
School ; summer session West Virginia University 1919 ; 
summer session American Conservatory of Music 1921 ; 
Sutton public schools 1919-1920 ; Logan public schools 
1920-1923 ; present position 1923. 

Richard F. Hamill Physical Education 

A.B. Davis Elkins College ; studied at West Virginia 
University summer term ; two years at Glenville 
Normal as director of athletics and teacher ; three 
years at Davis Elkins College as coach and teacher ; 
First Lieutenant at Plattsburgh 1918 (2 camps) ; 
Military Instructor, Wentworth Institute Boston, Mass. 
1918 ; present position 1923. 

Maude M. Hull Education 

. A.B. in West Virginia University 1919 ; attended sum- 
mer school Columbia University 1921-1922 ; four years 
in one-room country schools ; three years in village 
graded schools ; six years in the training school of the 
Fairmont State Normal School ; four years in the 
Education Department of High Schools ; present posi- 
tion 1921. 

Ethel Ice French ; Registrar 

A.B. 1910, West Virginia University; A.M. 1921, 
Teachers College, Columbia University ; one year in 
one-room country school ; two years in graded schools ; 
two years in Clarksburg High School ; present position 
1912. 

Nell Almyra Lanham Home Economics 

B.S. in Home Economics at West Virginia University; 
Demonstration School, Concord State Normal School, 
1917-18 ; Demonstration School, Marshall College 
Normal School, 1918-19 ; in Central Junior High, 
Charleston, 1920-21 ; present position 1923. 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



Laura F. Lewis English 

A.B. West Virginia University 1907 ; A.M. Columbia 
University 1918; five years teaching in ungraded rural 
schools ; two years principal of graded rural schools in 
Harrison County ; three years in graded city schools 
at Mannington ; three years in City High School at 
Fairmont, W. Va. ; one year in Denominational Col- 
lege, Ohio Valley ; seventeen years in State Normal 
Schools ; one year in West Virginia University ; present 
position 1913. 



E. L. Lively Sociology; Agriculture 

B.S. West Virginia University 1912; A.M. Ohio State 
University 1920; five years in public schools; three 
years principal of Junior High ; two years High School ; 
present position 1912. 

*E. E. Mercer Mathematics 



A.B. University of Nashville, 1891 ; student Harvard 
summer school, summers of 1904-1906 ; teacher in Waco 
College, Waco, Texas, 1892-1893; principal of schools, 
Berkeley Springs, W. Va., 1893-1895; teacher in P. 
S. N. S., 1895-1899; principal Fairmont High School 
1899-1901; present position 1901; 



M. E. McCarty Mathematics; Director of Extension 

A.B. University of Michigan 1915; A.M. University of 
Michigan 1922 ; principal of graded schools of Wetzel 
County 1909-12 ; rural schools of West Virginia 1902- 
07 ; principal of High School, Williamson, W. Va. 1915- 
23 ; present position 1923. 

Mrs. N. R. C. Morrow English; Chaplain 

Ph.B. University of Chicago 1917 ; A.M. Beaver Col- 
lege (honorary) 1890 ; post-graduate work University 
of Chicago ; studied in the West Virginia University 
and Columbia University ; present position 1899. 

* On leave of absence, 1923-24. 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



♦Irene Osborn Music Director 

B.S. in music, University of Illinois, 1924 ; first grade 
and music teacher in Stephensburg and Garwood, New 
Jersey, 1907-1910 ; the same in West New York, New 
Jersey 1910-1916 ; attended New York College of Music 
1911-1914; Ithaca Conservatory of Music 1916-1917; 
Music Teacher in Junior High School, Morgantown, 
1918-20; Music Supervisor, Morgantown 1921; sum- 
mer session, Cornell University 1921; present position 
1921. 

Paul F. Opp English 

A.B. Mt. Union College 1918; A.M. Columbia Univer- 
sity 1923 ; Professional Diploma, Teacher of English 
Columbia University 1923 ; Squadron Athletic Direc- 
tor U. S. Navy one year; Farmington High 
School English Department one year ; present position 
1923. 

Mahala Dorcas Prichard History; Dean of Women 

A.B. West Virginia University ; A.M. Teachers Col- 
lege Columbia University ; Professional Diploma, Dean 
of Women, Columbia University ; three years in public 
schools; present position 1912. 

Harold F. Rogers Chemistry 

A.B. West Virginia University 1901; A.M. Harvard 
1908 ; studied and practiced pharmacy, summers 1896- 
1906 and the year following graduation at West Vir- 
ginia University ; instructor of Physics and Chemistry, 
Fairmont State Normal School, 1903-4 ; similar posi- 
tion Glenville State Normal School, 1905-6; assistant 
principal, ibid. 1905-6 ; member of the teaching staff 
of the West Virginia University Department of Chem- 
istry, 1919-20, and twelve weeks summer term 1920; 
present position 1908. 

Francis Shreve Head of Education Department 

A.B. West Virginia University 1909 ; A.M. Ohio State 
University 1912; Ph.D. Peabody College, 1921; four 
years in rural schools; three years principal of el- 
ementary schools ; one year principal of high school ; 
two years Professor of Education, Wesleyan College ; 
present position 1915. 

* On leave of absence, 1923-24. 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



Watt Stewart Head of History Department 

A.B. West Virginia Wesleyan, 1920 ; one year graduate 
study at Teacher's College ; two years graduate study 
at Chicago University ; three years in graded schools ; 
four years in secondary schools ; present position 1923. 

Rachel Toivonen Physical Education 

B.Pd. Michigan State Normal College ; three years rural 
school, Michigan ; two years assistant P. E. M. S. N. 
College while student; present position 1918. 

Frank S. White Education 

A.B. University of Pittsburgh 1916 ; A.M. George Pea- 
body College 1923 ; taught in rural schools of Wood 
and Harrison Counties ; principal of Shinnston Schools 
1903-4 ; principal of Adamston School 1904-1907 ; prin- 
cipal of Northview School 1907-8 ; assistant principal 
of Flemington High School, 1909-1911 ; principal of 
Barnes School, Fairmont, 1913-1917 ; present position 
1917. 

Kathryn Beltzhoover Piano and Organ 

Kathryn Browning, A. B Dietitian 

Mrs. Emory F. McKinney Librarian 

Blanche Price Secretary 

ADDITIONAL SUMMER SCHOOL INSTRUCTORS 

I. O. Ash (Supt. Schools Shinnston) Education 

Wirt G. Faust (McAllister School) English 

Roy C. Hall (Morgantown High) History 

Charlotte M. Skinner (Dunkirk, N. Y.) Penmanship 

ADDITIONS TO THE FACULTY 

Marjory Ross Geography 

A.B. West Virginia University ; A.M. George Peabody 

College. 



10 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

TRAINING SCHOOL 

Evelyn Prickett Principal 

Myrtle McKinney Eighth Grade 

Bess Seckman Seventh Grade 

Louise Leonard and Mary Burns Sixth Grade 

Carolyn Barns Fifth Grade 

F. Willard Clayton Fourth Grade 

Olive Wallace Evans Third Grade 

Agnes Erwin Second Grade 

Willa Leonard First Grade 



FACULTY COMMITTEES 



Classification and Credits 

Mr. Barnes Mr. Shreve Mr. Lively 

Mr. Rosier Mr. Rogers Miss Ice 

Placement of Graduates 

Miss Hull Miss Gibson 

Employment for Students 

Miss Prichard Mr. Rosier 



Mr. Barnes 
Miss Price 
Mr. Hamill 
Miss Prichard 
Mr. Lively- 
Mrs. McKinney 
Mrs. Morrow 



Athletics 

Miss Toivenen 

Social 

Miss Beltzhoover 

Lecture Course 

Miss Briggs 

Library 

Mr. Stewart 

Chapel 

Miss Osborn 



Mr. Lively 
Mr. Opp 
Miss Ice 
Miss Lewis 
Miss Compton 



CLASS ADVISORS 

Normal Junior Miss Lewis 

Normal Senior Mr. Lively 

College Freshman Mr. Rogers 

College Sophomore Mr. White 

College Juniors Mr. Stewart 

College Seniors Mr. Shreve 



INSTRUCTIONS TO NEW STUDENTS 

Read this catalog through carefully, then if there are 
any questions you wish to ask, write directly to Joseph 
Rosier, President State Normal School, Fairmont, West 
Virginia. 

If you are to stay at home while attending the Normal, 
you need not make any arrangements previous to enroll- 
ing. Come to the Normal School building on September 
16 or as soon thereafter as possible, and directions for 
enrolling will be given you after you arrive at the build- 
ing. 

If you are not able to remain at home while you are 
attending Normal School, it is best to make arrangements 
for room and board before you come to Fairmont. All 
young women entering the Normal will be expected to 
engage rooms at the woman's hall, unless they have per- 
mission to stay with relatives or friends in the city. In 
any case you should write Miss Dorcas Prichard, Dean 
of Women, concerning the place where you are to stay 
while a student in the Normal. 

If you are a graduate of a four-year high school, you 
become, upon your entrance, a member of the Junior 
Normal or the Freshman College class. Your high 
school grades will be accepted at their full value, regard- 
less of what the subjects are. Ask the principal of the 
high school from which you graduated to send a full and 
accurate statement of all the work you did, to Miss Ethel 
Ice, Registrar. If possible, have this done before you 
enter the Normal School. 

If you have done advanced work in some college or 
normal school of approved standing, the work you have 
done there will be accepted at its full value on either 
Normal or College courses. Have all the grades you have 
made at other institutions certified to the Registrar of 
the Normal. When you send in this statement, request 
that the committee on classifications and credits pass 
upon your credits and give you your rating. This com- 
mittee will tell you how much work you have to com- 



14 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

plete to finish the course you wish to enter. (But see 
pages 30 and 31 for residence requirements.) 

If you are a teacher of maturity and experience, some 
credit on the Normal School Courses will be granted you 
by the committee of classifications and credits. The 
amount of credit given varies with the value of the ex- 
perience in teaching as determined by the committee, but 
in the Standard Normal and College Courses it cannot 
exceed a total of 10 semester hours. Credit for exper- 
ience will be given only after the student has done in the 
institution one term's work which is considered satisfac- 
tory by the committee. 

INFORMATION FOR NEW STUDENTS 

It is especially desirable that students enroll on the 
first day of the semester or term. On that one day only 
an effective system of enrolling students rapidly and 
accurately is in motion; after that day students have to 
await the leisure of class advisor, secretary, and regis- 
trar. Moreover, students who enroll late are sometimes 
not permitted to enter certain courses which have already 
been filled to capacity. 

Students are supervised in their study assignments by 
their class advisors. No change of any kind can be made 
in the study assignment except by permission of these 
class advisors, and no change can be made after four 
weeks of the semester have elapsed except by permission 
of the dean of instruction. 

Text books and school supplies may be purchased in the 
Administration building. 

Students are expected to attend the classes regularly and 
to keep up their work. Teachers report to the dean of 
instruction any failure to live up to this standard. If, 
after a reasonable time, the student is still indifferent, he 
may be asked to discontinue certain courses or to with- 
draw from school. 

When students are at the school building, they are ex- 
pected to be in class, in the library, in the rooms ap- 
pointed for talk and study, or in authorized extra-curric- 
ular activities or organizations. 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 15 

The grading system is as follows: "A" excellent; "B" 
good; "C" average; "D" fair; "E" failure. The teacher 
may, at his discretion, give less credit to any student 
than the course usually carries; he may, for example, cut 
down to one, two or three semester hours the credit in a 
four-hour course. 

A report of progress is sent to the students' parents 
or guardian at the mid-semester, and a report of credits 
and grades is sent at the end of the term or semester. 

The committee on placement of graduates assists stu- 
dents in securing positions to teach. The committee, 
however, accepts no responsibility in the matter and does 
not promise to secure positions; its function is to assist 
and collaborate with the students. 

Chapel is held once a week, on Thursday morning at ten 
o'clock. Students who are in the administration building 
at that hour are expected to attend chapel. 

THE FUNCTION AND PLACE OF THIS SCHOOL 

Fairmont State Normal School exists to prepare teach- 
ers. More specifically, it exists to prepare teachers and 
supervisors for the elementary and high schools of cen- 
tral and northern West Virginia. It is not in any sense 
a competitor with the high schools of the state or with 
liberal arts colleges or professional institutions of the 
state; it has its own special field of endeavor and is satis- 
fied to cultivate that field. 

The Normal School graduates about two hundred teach- 
ers every year. It sends out, to twenty-five or more 
counties in this part of West Virginia, well-prepared and 
well-trained young men and women to teach in the cities, 
villages, and rural communities. Each one of these teach- 
ers influences twenty or thirty boys and girls every year, 
so that the work of the Normal School is affecting the 
educational conditions all over this section of the state. 
Undoubtedly, not a little of the progressive, modern, whole- 
some spirit observable in the schools, much of the im- 
provement in teaching methods, much of the educational 
reform that has been sweeping over the central and 



16 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

northern counties of the state, has been due to the in- 
fluence of Fairmont Normal. 

The normal school is always the pivotal point of a pub- 
lic school system. If the normal school is ineffective, the 
entire school system suffers, directly and seriously. The 
preparation and training of teachers is therefore an ab- 
solute essential to the success of a system of public edu- 
cation. Fairmont Normal School clearly recognizes this 
fact, and is endeavoring to discharge the tremendous re- 
sponsibilities committed to its charge. It is especially 
aware of the unusual conditions in education brought on 
by the Great War; the scarcity of teachers, new ideas of 
education, new duties thrown upon the public schools of 
America; and in attempting to give some assistance to- 
ward the solution of these vital problems Fairmont Nor- 
mal feels that she is doing her largest service. 

The Normal has fitted itself into the public school sys- 
tem of the state and articulates perfectly with all other 
parts of the system. It gives graduates of four-year 
high schools entrance without examinations or conditions 
or stipulating what subjects they must have had; it sets 
up no arbitrary standards, it makes no attempt to in- 
fluence in this way the curriculum of the public schools. 
It has a special one-year course for those who wish to 
teach in villages or the country; it encourages specializa- 
tion in definite kinds of teaching ; it provides special work 
in physical training, children's games, story-telling, music, 
drawing, agriculture, English, manual arts of various 
kinds — in fact, whenever it has been possible, the Normal 
has endeavored to prepare teachers in all the new subjects 
and for all the new duties as they have been made ap- 
parent. Whenever it is evident that a desirable change 
in the public school system has taken place or is about to 
take place, Fairmont Normal does its utmost to adjust 
its work, its ideals, its traditions, to this change. 

One of the ways in which Fairmont Normal is of a 
special service to the teaching profession is in its help- 
fulness to teachers already in service. There are always 
many teachers who cannot afford to attend school for an 
entire year at one time. Through its special spring and 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 17 

summer terms, and through its correspondence and ex- 
tension classes, the Normal School comes to the aid of 
such teachers, making it possible for them to continue 
their academic and professional studies. Each year teach- 
ers in service graduate from the Normal School, the ed- 
ucation obtained through experience in teaching being es- 
timated and counted toward graduation. 

IDEALS AND SPIRIT OF THE SCHOOL 

Every educational institution develops, in the course of 
years, a distinctive and characteristic "school spirit." It 
is this, rather than the buildings or equipment or the 
faculty, which most clearly distinguishes one school from 
another and gives each school almost a personal individ- 
uality. 

Fairmont Normal's school spirit is well-known; the un- 
usual ideals and traditions of the school are almost im- 
mediately perceived by the new student or the visitor. 
The spirit is attractive and wholesome, and it accounts 
for the feeling of intense loyalty and devotion which 
students and graduates show for the school. 

Very prominent in Fairmont Normal is the richness and 
fineness of the social life of the students. For years it 
has been the tradition that Fairmont Normal students 
should engage in many diversified social activities, that 
Fairmont Normalites be acquainted with the best usages 
and trained in good breeding and the social arts. The 
authorities of the school believe that this is an important 
part of the education of any young man or woman, par- 
ticularly of anyone preparing to teach. Parties, recep- 
tions, teas, picnics, formal and informal gatherings of 
various sorts are therefore recognized and encouraged as 
an essential feature in the life of Fairmont Normal — all 
of these being subject to the direction and supervision of 
the Dean of Women and the Social Committee of the 
Faculty. 

Another noticeable quality of the life at Fairmont Nor- 
mal is the student freedom that prevails. The Faculty 
governs by suggestion and advice rather than by rules 



18 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

and strict regulations, thus throwing the responsibility for 
conduct largely upon the students themselves. Visitors 
to the Normal School are always impressed by the lack 
of friction, by the absence of visible authority, by the fact 
that the school seems to "run itself." As a result of this 
liberality and freedom from imposed discipline, there has 
not been a serious case of misconduct or severe punish- 
ment at the Normal for several years. The authorities of 
the school believe that by thus giving the students more 
freedom of government and by placing more and more 
responsibility upon them as they show themselves worthy 
of it, they will be the better prepared for assuming the 
duties of teaching and the better prepared to accept re- 
sponsibility and to display initiative. 

A third feature of the school life at Fairmont Normal 
is the excellent quality of the studentship. Hard, earnest, 
serious work is expected and exacted of the students. 
Those who are not willing to work diligently in the class 
room and in the many student activities and organizations, 
are not invited to attend Fairmont Normal. The life of 
the average student at this institution is a very busy 
one; that is one of the traditions of the school, it is a 
part of the school spirit. 

Finally, as Fairmont Normal is a teachers' school, the 
"atmosphere" is distinctly professional. "Teaching" is the 
subject most talked about throughout the school; the am- 
bitions and hopes of every student center in teaching; it 
is the common goal of all. In consequence, there is a 
unanimity of purpose and effort, a singleness of aim that 
inspires all who attend the school and gives them zeal 
and enthusiasm for teaching. 

All this makes Fairmont State Normal School a most 
excellent place for living a full, rich, happy, busy life, 
for securing inspiration and preparation to enter upon one 
of life's most important vocations: teaching. 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 19 

HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL 

Provisions for the establishment of the Fairmont State 
Normal School were made by the State Legislature of 
1867, and an appropriation was provided for the inaugu- 
ration of the work of the school. In the Act providing 
for the school, its purpose was declared to be that of ed- 
ucating and training teachers in the improved methods of 
instruction and discipline that would be of the best service 
to the common schools of the State. For more than fifty 
years the Normal School has striven to carry forward the 
purpose of its founders. Thousands of young men and 
women have been enrolled as students, and have felt the 
influence of the instruction which has been given, and 
thousands have been graduated and are engaged in the 
different vocations of the State, exerting wide influence in 
public affairs. From the beginning, the Normal School 
gave prominence to the idea of teacher training, with 
the result that the graduates of the school are very 
prominent in the educational work of the State. The 
men and women whose names have appeared in the list 
of faculties have been widely known for their ability and 
scholarship, and the instruction which has been given 
by them has been far reaching in its effects. 

In material and equipment, the Normal School has made 
steady advancement. In 1872 an appropriation was made 
by the State Legislature for the erection of a new build- 
ing in conjunction with the local Board of Education. 
The building was completed and occupied in June, 1873. 
For many years, the building, standing at the corner of 
Main and Quincy streets, housed both the Normal School 
and the Public Schools of Fairmont. It has been entirely 
abandoned for school use. In the year 1893 the Normal 
School was moved into a new building on Fairmont Ave- 
nue, between Second and Third streets. Several years 
ago the State authorities recognized the need of the in- 
stitution for a larger site, with more room for buildings. 
The Board of Control, therefore, was authorized by the 
State Legislature to purchase new grounds at the far end 
of Locust Avenue, on the west side of Fairmont. The new 



20 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

site consists of eighteen and one-half acres of ground 
ideally located for the institution. In January, 1917, the 
Normal School was moved into the magnificent new build- 
ing, which is to be its home in the future. Since that 
time a temporary gymnasium and a beautiful girls' dor- 
mitory have been constructed. 

The curriculum has steadily been enlarged and im- 
proved to keep pace with the needs of the times. For 
many years the curriculum was parallel to that of a high 
school. About 1912 a year's work was added, making it 
necessary for graduates of a standard high school to 
spend one year in the Normal. About 1915 another year's 
work was added, bringing the school up to standard nor- 
mal work. In 1920 the high school, or academic depart- 
ment was discontinued. The last step was taken in 1923. 
At this time the Normal School was granted permission 
to offer a four-year college course and to grant the A. B. 
degree in Education. The first college degrees were 
granted in June, 1924. 

LOCATION 

The Fairmont State Normal School is located at Fair- 
mont, West Virginia, on the Monongahela River, near the 
junction of the Tygarts Valley and West Fork Rivers. 
It is on the main line of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, 
and at the terminus of the Monongahela Railroad. It 
may be reached on the Monongahela Valley Traction 
Company interburban lines from Weston, Bridgeport, 
Clarksburg, Mannington and Fairview. It is the geo- 
graphical center of one of the most populous sections of 
the state. Clarksburg, Grafton, Elkins, Mannington, 
Moundsville, Wheeling, Parkersburg and other important 
towns and cities are within a short distance; Fairmont is 
one of the most accessible cities of the State. 

Fairmont is a busy, modern, progressive city of about 
25,000 population, with a commission form of government, 
electric lighting, pure water supply — all the advantages 
and conveniences of a modern urban community. It has 
many fine churches of different denominations, and it has 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 21 

one of the best public school systems in the country. Its 
population is composed of an enterprising and wide-awake 
class of people. Its citizens take an active interest in 
education and all movements for the advancement of the 
community and the state. Many of America's famous 
public men and women and most noted speakers have been 
brought to Fairmont by some of the city's clubs and so- 
cieties. For these reasons, it is an especially favorable 
location for an educational institution. 

BUILDINGS AND CAMPUS 

The main building is a fine example of classic architec- 
ture, and is one of the finest public buildings that has 
been erected by the State. With its architectural beauty 
it combines a practical arrangement and equipment for 
school work. It stands in the center of the spacious new 
campus and commands a beautiful view of the surround- 
ing country. The building is 265 feet long, 65 feet wide, 
and three stories in height. The outside walls are made 
of light brick trimmed with limestone and terra cotta. 
Beautiful steps and approaches have been completed. It 
contains a fine auditorium, large library, study halls, 
society rooms, rooms for domestic science and domestic 
art, biological laboratories, chemical and physical labora- 
tories, science lecture rooms, music rooms, offices, lunch 
rooms and general recitation rooms. Although very large, 
the building has already been outgrown by the rapidly 
enlarging student body. The legisature of 1923, recogniz- 
ing this, appropriated $60,000 to build a wing, which will 
contain library, reading room, a cafeteria, offices, and 
additional class rooms. 

The woman's hall, which was finished in 1922, is of the 
same architecture and material as the main building. It 
is situated in the rear and at right angles to the main 
building, with a beautiful view in all directions over the 
hills. The hall has accommodations for seventy-five young 
ladies, besides liberal provision for parlors, dining room 
and suites for the matron. The woman's hall is in charge 
of a mature woman of experience and special training, so 



22 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

that the occupants will be as well cared for as they would 
be in their own home. All in all, the woman's hall is 
one of the finest dormitories in West Virginia. 

A temporary wooden gymnasium has been constructed 
on the campus and is in constant use by students of the 
Normal School, and other schools in this community. It 
has one of the best basketball floors in the State. The 
Monongahela Valley Basketball Tournament is held here 
annually, and is one of the important events of the athletic 
year. The gymnasium provides splendid opportunities for 
the training of students in all indoor games and sports. 
It is the laboratory of the department of physical edu- 
cation. 

The campus is rapidly becoming one of the most beau- 
tiful and picturesque grounds in the State. Several acres 
have been laid out in gardens, trees and shrubbery are 
being planted, walks and roads laid, and other improve- 
ments made. 

It is hoped that within a few months the school will 
own twenty additional acres of land adjoining the present 
campus, to be used as an athletic field. 

TRAINING SCHOOLS 

Arrangements have been made with the Board of Edu- 
cation of Fairmont Independent District by which the 
Butcher School, located on Fourth street, is open to the 
regular Normal School Seniors for observation and prac- 
tice teaching, and through the courtesy of the local school 
authorities the other schools of the city and community 
have been opened to students. 

Arrangements have been made also for training facili- 
ties in the schools of Fairmont Magisterial District and of 
the East Side. All students of the Normal School have 
abundant opportunity to observe excellent teaching and to 
practice teaching, under competent critic teachers. All 
training work is under the direction of the Education 
department of the Normal School. 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 23 

LIBRARY 

Fairmont Normal has a library of more than eight 
thousand volumes, in charge of a competent librarian 
and assistants. The books have been selected with care, 
with the special view of getting together the best books 
in the different fields of knowledge and literature and 
specifically in the field of Education. Virtually all the 
authoritative books on Education, all the classics in Eng- 
lish and American Literature, and all well-known refer- 
ence books are to be found in the library. Modern fiction, 
drama, and poetry are well represented. 

In the library are to be found more than one hundred 
of the most useful and popular newspapers and magazines, 
both educational and general. Students are allowed free 
access to these periodicals, and each week the librarian 
posts on the library bulletin lists of stories and articles 
most worth reading, so that the student may be assisted 
in finding what he wants to read. The library owns a 
large number of bound volumes of periodicals of recent 
years. 

EXPENSES 

It is the aim of the Normal School authorities to keep 
the expenses for students as low as is consistent with 
their being well provided for. Fairmont is not an inex- 
pensive place to live, but the new woman's hall will allow 
of students being cared for at very reasonable cost. It 
is estimated that a year's schooling at Fairmont Normal 
costs about as follows: 

Board and Room $300.00 

Tuition and class expense 20.00 

Laundry 30.00 

Books and stationery 15.00 

Miscellaneous .._... 35.00 

Total „...$400.00 

(Rooms at Morrow Hall range from $1.75 to $2.25 a 
week. Table board is $5.00 a week.) 



24 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

This summary is estimated on the needs of the aver- 
age student. Some students will spend considerably more 
than this, and some will be able to attend school for 
slightly less. 

No one who desires to attend school at Fairmont Nor- 
mal should become discouraged because he is not provided 
with sufficient money to pay all his expenses. There is 
abundance of work of various kinds for young men and 
women, in and about Fairmont, and any ambitious and 
energetic student can make his own way while attending 
school. A faculty committee assists students to secure 
employment. 

A good many young women students secure room for 
light housekeeping, and reduce the cost of living mater- 
ially, especially if they can have some provisions sent them 
from home. 

ORGANIZATIONS AND STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Student organizations and activities carried on by 
students have a distinct and notable place in the school. 
Recognizing that they encourage initiative and self- 
control, provide laboratory training in English, teach par- 
liamentary law, and train in appearing before the public, 
and realizing that this is of special value for teachers, 
the authorities manifest keen interest in the conduct and 
success of the established organizations and the formation 
of new ones. Every student can find some kind of student 
work that fits in with his interest and talents. 

STUDENT BODY 

The entire school is organized into an association known 
as the Student Body which meets regularly once a month 
and at the call of the president. It fills an important 
place in the general work of the Normal School. Through 
this organization, receptions are arranged, officers of the 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 25 

"Columns" and "Pamphlet" elected, special committees 
appointed, the lecture course directed, and many other 
services as they arise from time to time rendered. A 
Student Body fee of $2.50 a year is required, of all 
students. This covers the cost of receptions, flowers, and 
additional expenses for the student body. It also entitles 
the student to a ticket for all numbers in the regular 
lecture course. 

SOCIAL CABINET 

The president of the Student Body and the presidents 
of all the school organizations, together with a faculty 
representative, constitute what is known as the Social 
Cabinet. This is the advisory board of the Student Body. 
Through it many wholesome movements are launched and 
projects initiated. 

CLASS ORGANIZATIONS 

At the beginning of the school year each academic class 
forms an organization by electing officers and appointing 
committees. The classes give parties, engage in athletic 
contests, and act as units in all the activities of the school. 
A member of the faculty serves as class advisor to each 
class. 

WRITERS' CLUBS 

Students who are interested in writing have an oppor- 
tunity to carry on literary work through the Writers' 
Club. This organization publishes The Columns, a fort- 
nightly news magazine, and The Pamphlet, a pictorial 
year-book. The Columns is a member of the West Virginia 
Intercollegiate Press Association. Work on The Columns 
may be credited on English 46. 



26 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

THE MASQUERS 

"The Masquers" is the name of the organization of 
students interested in dramatic work. It is one of the 
most efficient and popular clubs in the Normal School. 
During the year 1923-24 ten plays were given among 
which were productions by Arlo Bates, Constance D'Arcy 
Mackay. W. W. Jacobs, Mary Mapes Dodge, Van Tassel 
Sutphen, Arnold Bennett, George Middleton, and Booth 
Tarkington. Some of these ranked unusually high as 
amateur productions. Work in this club may be credited 
on English 46. 

ORATORICAL SOCIETY 

Those who desire to develop ability as public speakers 
have abundant opportunities through the activities of the 
Oratorical Society. Both debating and orating are carried 
on. This club is a charter of the West Virginia Inter- 
collegiate Forensic Association. Debates were held during 
the past year with Shepherd College and New River State 
School. Work in this organization may be credited on 
English 46. 

GLEE CLUBS 

Fairmont State Normal has two Glee Clubs: one for 
the young men and one for the young women. These are 
voluntary organizations. All students having musical 
ability belong to one or the other of these organizations, 
and meet once a week throughout the year for practice 
and rehearsals. At times during the year the two organ- 
izations combine to give a joint public program. The 
instructor of vocal music in the Normal School is director 
of these clubs. Credit for glee club work may be secured, 
as Music 3. 

CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS 

Fairmont Normal has active chapters of both the Young 
Men's Christian Association and the Young Women's 
Christian Association. The latter is especially large and 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 27 

influential. These organizations have monthly program 
meetings and carry on throughout the year a number of 
charitable and religious activities. Representatives of the 
Association are sent each year to the national meetings. 

WOMEN'S SOCIAL CLUBS 

The young women living in Morrow Hall have formed 
a "house" organization, with officers and committees, to 
carry on the social affairs of the Hall. The young women 
students living in Fairmont have an organization known 
as the "0. I. T." (Out in Town) club, which attempts to 
secure cooperation and consolidation among these students. 

LECTURE COURSE 

The Lecture Course which is under the direction of the 
Student Body and the faculty committee, is one of the 
most notable features of Normal School life. Each year 
six or eight programs, consisting of lectures, concerts, 
plays and various kinds of entertainment, are given in 
the school auditorium. 

HIKERS' CLUB 

The young women of the school have organized a 
Hikers' Club which is active especially in the fall and 
spring months. The purpose of this club is to take hikes 
out from Fairmont through the country and nearby towns. 
Any girl student in school may join this club. Miss 
Toivonen, director of physical education, is leader. 

ATHLETICS 

Fairmont Normal engages in all major branches of 
organized interscholastic athletics: baseball, football, 
basketball, track, and tennis. It is the policy of the 
institution to provide equipment and apparatus and to 
encourage athletic sports within moderation. No effort 
has been made or will be made to bring the athletic 
activities to a higher level than that attained by other 
activities of the school. Coaches and physical directors 



.19500 



28 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

are employed, a well balanced schedule is made each 
season, and the students support the teams loyally and 
enthusiastically: that is all that can reasonably be 
expected. 

One of the pleasant features of the athletic life in 
Fairmont Normal is the popularity of inter-class games. 
The different classes have their teams, play a regular 
schedule of games and hold inter-class contests. The 
young women's basketball teams representing the various 
classes hold a tournament once a year, the winning team 
being given a loving cup. 

As an illustration of the nature of the athletic activity 
of Fairmont, the football schedule for 1924 is given: 
Oct. 4, Wesleyan Freshmen at Fairmont; Oct. 11, West 
Liberty at Wheeling; Oct. 17, California Normal at Cal- 
ifornia, Pa.; Oct. 25, open; Nov. 1, Glenville Normal at 
Glenville; Nov. 7, Potomac State at Fairmont; Nov. 14, 
Broaddus College at Fairmont; Nov. 27, New River State 
at Montgomery. 

SCHOLARSHIPS 

The local chapter of the Daughters of the American 
Revolution maintains a scholarship of two hundred and 
fifty dollars a year. The holder of the scholarship must 
be a young woman from one of the mountain counties of 
West Virginia, and after graduation she is expected to 
return to her native county to teach. 

The local chapter of the Daughters of the Confederacy 
offers a scholarship of one hundred dollars a year. The 
holder of this scholarship must be a descendant, either 
male or female, of a Confederate veteran. 

CLASS MEMORIALS 

One of the pleasant and picturesque customs of the 
Fairmont Normal is the giving by the Standard Normal 
Senior Class of a memorial to the school, some kind of 
permanent memento. Among the recent gifts have been: 
a marble bench, class of 1921; a trophy case, class of 
1922; a sum of money for an archway, class of 1923. 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 29 

COURSES OF STUDY 

Fairmont State Normal School is now a teachers' 
college. Beginning in 1923 a full four-year college course, 
leading to the degree of Bachelor of Arts in Education, 
was offered. 

The institution offers two courses of study: the College 
course, and the Standard (two-year) Normal course. 

Before studying the different courses the student should 
learn the following definition: 

An hour, usually called "semester hour," is the credit 
received for taking a subject one recitation period a week 
for eighteen weeks. Thus, taking a subject three times 
per week for eighteen weeks would give the student three 
semester hours' credit. It will be seen that a student 
taking four subjects four times a week for two semesters 
should receive 32 "semester hours" credit. This is the 
amount of credit usually earned in a year. Two class 
periods in laboratory work are equivalent to one recitation 
period in a subject requiring preparation for the recita- 
tion. This rule of measurement applies also to subjects 
not requiring preparation, such as physical training, 
music, and drawing. 

COLLEGE COURSES 

PURPOSE : This course is designed to prepare teachers 
for Junior and Senior High Schools and supervisory 
positions. 

ENTRANCE : "The present requirements for gradua- 
tion as fixed by the West Virginia High School course 
of study will be recognized for college entrance to West 
Virginia Normal Schools and Colleges." 

But "Students will be admitted to the State Normal 
Schools and Colleges on presentation of 15 units of High 
School credit, the remaining unit to be made up during 
the first or second year of Normal School or College 
work." 

LENGTH: This course consists of four full years of 
work above a four-year high school course. One hundred 
twenty-eight semester hours are required for graduation. 



30 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

RESIDENCE: Thirty-two hours must be done in res- 
idence at the Normal School, sixteen hours of which must 
be done in one semester of the senior year. 

RATE AT WHICH CREDIT CAN BE EARNED: The 
regular amount of work for each year of this course is 
32 semester hours. In the first two years of the course 
the student may, by permission of his class advisor, carry 
36 semester hours a year. In the last two years of the 
course the student may, by permission of his class advisor, 
carry 34 semester hours a year. Only superior students 
are given permission to carry more than 32 hours. 

ADVANCED CREDIT: "Work done in any state 
normal school, college, or university of the state, shall be 
credited, hour for hour, by any other Normal School, 
College or University of the state, subject to residence, 
graduation, and special requirements on account of mem- 
bership in any approved association of colleges or univer- 
sities." Students and graduates in the Normal Courses, 
either in this institution or elsewhere, will receive credit 
hour for hour for work done in these courses. Thus, a 
graduate of the Standard Normal course, who has earned 
64 semester hours, would receive credit for 64 hours on 
the College course, leaving 64 hours additional work to 
complete. 

CERTIFICATE GRANTED: Graduates of the college 
course receive a certificate from the State of West Vir- 
ginia, which certificate enables them to act as principal 
or supervisor or to teach in any high school or elementary 
school in the state, and which is accepted by most other 
states as the equivalent of the high school certificate in 
those states. 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 31 



STANDARD NORMAL COURSES 

PURPOSE: These courses are designed to prepare 
teachers for positions in the elementary schools of the 
towns and cities of West Virginia. Graduates of these 
courses are recommended for positions in the elementary 
schools of the state. 

ENTRANCE: The same requirements as for those 
entering the college course. (See page 29.) 

LENGTH: These courses represent two full years of 
work above a four-year high school course; 64 semester 
hours are required for graduation. 

RESIDENCE: 32 hours of the 64 hours must be done 
in Fairmont Normal. At least 24 of the 32 hours must 
be done in residence; the remaining 8 hours may be done 
through correspondence or extension work from Fairmont 
Normal. 

RATE AT WHICH CREDIT MAY BE EARNED: 

The regular amount of work for each year of these courses 
is 32 semester hours. Exceptional students may be given 
permission by their class advisors to carry a maximum 
of 36 semester hours. 

ADVANCED CREDIT: Credit in the Normal Courses 
is allowed, hour for hour, for work done in any institution 
of recognized standing beyond high school rank, or for 
work done as fifth year work in those high schools 
approved by the State Department of Education as capable 
of giving fifth year work. 

CERTIFICATE GRANTED: Graduates of these 
courses receive a certificate from the State of West Vir- 
ginia, good for five years, and renewable almost indefin- 
itely, so that it is practically a certificate for life. This 
enables the graduates to teach in any school in West 
Virginia, and it is usually accepted by other states as 
equivalent to the highest elementary certificate in those 
states. 



32 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

SALARY: Graduates of Standard Normal Courses 
cannot receive, under the law of West Virginia, a salary 
of less than $100.00 a month. This is the basic salary for 
the first term of teaching. Most graduates of Fairmont 
Normal start in with a salary of from $110.00 to $140.00 
a month. 

THE "SHORT COURSE" CERTIFICATE 

Fairmont Normal has offered for some years a one-year 
course, called the "Short Course". Beginning with the 
school year 1924-25 this course is discontinued. But the 
school continues to grant the so-called "Short Course 
Equivalent" certificate, to all those who finish the first 
year of the Standard Course, and who find it necessary 
or desirable to teach for a time before completing the 
Standard Course. This certificate enables its holder to 
teach in any elementary school of the state, at a salary 
of not less than $90.00 a month. 

REGULATIONS OF THE STATE BOARD OF 

EDUCATION 

The West Virginia Board of Education has passed cer- 
tain regulations concerning credits, certificates, etc., some 
of which regulations are printed below. They apply to 
Fairmont Normal beginning with the school year 1924-25. 

I. No advance credit for work of high school grade: 

Work done in high school or other institutions before 
the completion of a standard four-year high school course 
shall not be credited for advanced credit in the State 
Normal Schools and Colleges, except by order of the State 
Board of Education. 

II. Limits on credit for professional work: 

The minimum and maximum of professional work in 
the courses listed below shall be as indicated: 

Min. Max. 

(a) In the College Course for Teachers 20 hrs. 36 hrs. 

(b) The Standard Normal Course ... 24 " 32 " 

(c) In the Short Normal Course 18 " 20 " 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 33 

III. Credit for teaching experience: 

1. Credit for teaching experience is recommended for 
persons who are taking courses in preparation for teach- 
ing, and is to be allowed at the discretion of the officials 
of institutions, under conditions indicated below: 

2. The student must submit satisfactory evidence of 
successful teaching experience. 

3. The student must do at least one term of work in 
residence before the credit for experience is approved and 
entered on the records of the institution. (Credit for 
experience may be refused a student whose residence work 
is unsatisfactory.) 

4. Credit for experience must be recorded as such, and 
substituted for elective courses, and must not be substi- 
tuted for required subjects. 

5. Credit for teaching experience in any year may be 
allowed as high school credit or as college credit, but in 
no case shall credit be allowed more than once for the same 
year of teaching. 

6. The following is the maximum amount of credit that 
may be given for teaching experience: 

(a) First year of experience, no credit. 

(b) For second, third, fourth, fifth and sixth years, 
one-half unit of high school credit, or two semester hours 
of college credit for each year in which the student taught 
a full term of school. 

i I 

IV. Credit on a teacher's certificate: 

1. On an elementary certificate earned in the Uniform 
Examination, one-half unit of credit may be allowed on 
each of the following subjects in which the applicant has 
received a grade of 85 per cent or more : Reading, English 
Grammar, Arithmetic, Physiology, United States History, 
Geography, Agriculture, Civil Government, Theory and 
Art of Teaching, State History, Bookkeeping, Ancient 
History. 






34 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

2. Credit for a subject on a teacher's certificate cannot 
be allowed if the student has already received credit for 
identical or similar work. 

3. Credit given on Reading and English Grammar on 
account of a teachers' certificate can be substituted only 
for first year high school English. 

V. Credit on Reading Circle Books: 

1. A person who has made a grade of 85 per cent on 
any approved subjects of the Reading Circle Course by 
state examination may receive credit as follows: 

(a) On a high school course, one-fourth unit in each 
subject. 

(b) On a normal school course, two semester hours on 
each subject. 

VI. Extension Classes: 

1. In Extension Classes conducted by members of the 
faculty of the institution, the conditions and standards of 
work should be as far as possible, the same as required 
in resident classes. 

2. A State Institution may recognize extension classes 
taught by persons not on the regular faculty under the 
following general conditions : 

(a) The instructor must hold the degree of Master 
of Arts or have equivalent training in the subjects taught. 

(b) He must be approved by the head of the institu- 
tion's department in which the work is to be credited. 

(c) A person regularly engaged in school work may 
conduct not more than one two-hour course a semester. 

(d) The student must be on the same scholastic level 
as are students doing similar work in the institution. 

3. Credit for work in extension classes shall be given 
on the general basis of 18 recitation hours for one hour 
of credit. 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 35 

VII. Correspondence work: 

1. Credit for correspondence courses shall be given on 
the general basis of 54 hours of study for 1 hour of credit, 
and the final examination shall be given by the person 
designated by the institution offering the course. 

2. The total amount of correspondence work that may 
be accredited on any course shall be as follows: 

(a) In the standard college course, 20 hours. 

(b) In the standard normal course, 12 hours. 

(c) Short Normal Course, 8 hours. 

VIII. Credit for Extension work limited: 

1. The total amount of extension work (including cor- 
respondence work) that may be done during one term of 
teaching shall not be more than 8 hours, not more than 
6 of which may be in correspondence work. 

IX. Temporary and equivalent certificates: 

1. Beginning with 1925 the requirement for temporary 
certificate shall be 12 weeks of work in residence and at 
least 11 hours of credit in addition to high school 
graduation. 

2. The short normal equivalent certificate may be 
issued to any one who obtains credit for the first year of 
the standard normal course as outlined in the catalogue. 

3. Any person who has completed the work required 
for, or equivalent to that of any course on which is issued 
a teacher's certificate, but who has not met the residence 
or other graduation requirements for a diploma may have 
his work approved by the State Board of Education and 
the corresponding certificate may be issued without formal 
graduation. The school work of such person will be 
approved only when the applicant meets the following 
conditions : 



36 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

(a) The applicant must make application on the form 
prepared by the State Department of Education, 
giving a definite statement of the information re- 
quested. (Apply for Teacher-Training Form 14.) 

(b) All school work done must be evaluated and ap- 
proved by the faculty or accrediting committee of 
a West Virginia School or College authorized to give 
the course for which such work is being approved. 

(c) The applicant must be recommended by the city or 
district and county superintendent under whom he 
has had his most recent teaching experience. 

CONTENTS OF THE COLLEGE COURSE 

The College course is not organized and outlined by the 
semester-schedule plan, but by major subjects, minors, 
groups, and electives. Courses are to be taken, whenever 
possible, in the order of their numerical designation; cer- 
tain courses may be taken only in the junior and senior 
years; certain other courses may not be entered upon 
until certain pre-requisite courses have been finished. 

To graduate from the College a student must see that 
his work conforms to the following requirements: 

1. A total of 128 semester hours. 

2. Required of all students: 36 hours. 

1. In Education 24. 

2. In Physical Education 8. 

3. In English 4. 

3. Major — 24 hours. 
Minor — 16 hours. 

4. Electives 52 hours. 

These elective hours must be distributed among at 
least four additional departments or groups, with not 
fewer than 8 hours in each group. 

The major and minor subjects shall be chosen not later 
than the beginning of the sophomore year. The student 
should select as his major the subject that he desires to 
teach. The minor should be chosen from a related field, 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 37 

or should be the second subject that the student would 
elect to teach, if he should be called upon to teach two 
subjects. 

At least 12 hours of the 24 hours offered as the major 
must be earned in courses scheduled for the junior and 
senior years (courses numbered from "20" upward.) 

In 1924-25 the majors and minors may be chosen from 
the following departments or groups: 



1. 


Education. 








2. 


English. 








3. 


History. 








4. 


Chemistry. 








5. 


Biology (agriculture 


, botany and nature s 


tudy). 


6. 


Mathematics. 








7. 


Home Economics 


(domestic art 


and 


domestic 


science). 








8. 


Fine Arts (drawing and music). 







If education is elected as a major 30 hours are pre- 
scribed, 6 hours in addition to the general prescription of 
24 hours. 

Minors may be chosen, also, from: 

1. Sociology. 

2. Physical Education (including physiology and hy- 
giene). 

3. French. 

Graduates of the Normal Course may complete the col- 
lege course by doing 64 hours in addition to the 64 hours 
required in the normal course. The 64 additional hours, 
however, must be distributed so as to meet the general 
requirements for graduation in the college with respect to 
majors and minors, and the distribution among four addi- 
tional departments, and must include 12 hours additional 
work in education. 

Work taken in the second year of the Normal Course 
may be counted on the major and minor subjects. Work 
taken in the first year may be counted on the 56 elective 
hours. 



38 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



The plan of the college course may readily be under- 
stood by the outline on page 39. Each student working 
for a degree should obtain a copy of this outline from 
his class, advisor and, with his aid, work, from semester 
to semester, to secure a well-rounded and symmetrical 
course. 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



39 



OUTLINE OF COURSES LEADING TO AN A. B. 

Name Address 



Hrs 















?4 


Education 1 


3 




Education 22 


4 






Education 20 


4 




Education 24 


2 






Education 21 


4 













English 

♦English 1 



♦English 2 



Physical Education 

(Men) 
Physical Education 1 


2 




(Women) 
Physical Education 1 


3 




8 


Physical Education 5 


2 




Physical Education 3-4 


2 






Physical Education 7 


2 




Physical Education 23 


1 






Physical Education 25 


2 




Physical Education 24 


2 







Major. 



Minor. 



16 



Distributed Electives: Four Groups 

1 



32 



Free Electives. 



20 



Total 128 

♦Requirement may be waived if the student can pass a satisfactory examination in 
English. 



40 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



CONTENTS OF THE STANDARD NORMAL COURSE 

Students entering the Standard Normal course have a 
choice of any one of three differentiated curricula: 
Primary, intermediate, and junior high. The differentia- 
tion does not begin, however, until the second semester of 
the junior year, in order that students may have an op- 
portunity, during the first semester, of deciding what 
work they wish to take. Certain subjects (called "con- 
stants", and marked with a star) are found in all the 
Standard Normal courses. The electives are chosen from 
the list of subjects outlined in this catalog, but must be 
approved by the class advisor. 

The requirements in English 1 and 2 will be waived 
upon satisfactory entrance examination. These examina- 
tions will be held a day or two after the opening of each 
term. 

PROGRAM OF STUDIES 

Primary Curriculum 

Junior Year 

♦Education 1. Introduction to Teaching 3 hours 

♦Education 2. Educational Psychology.... 4 

♦Physical Education 1. Physiology and Hygiene 3 

♦Sociology 1. Social Relations 1 

♦English 1 2 

♦English 2 2 

Education 3. Supervised Study h 4 

Physical Education 3. Teachers' Physical 

Education , 2 

Art 5. Drawing Methods u 2 

Electives 9 

Total 32 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 41 

Senior Year 

*Education 8. Tests and Measurements 2 hours 

Education 4. Primary Methods 4 

* Education 6. School Management and School 

Hygiene 4 

*Education 9. Observation and Teaching 5 

English 4. Children's Literature , 2 

Music 2. Music Methods 2 

Biology 1. Nature Study . 2 

English 3. Story Telling , 2 

Electives 9 

Total 32 

Intermediate Curriculum 

Junior Year 

♦Education 1. Introduction to Teaching 3 hours 

♦Education 2. Educational Psychology.... 4 

♦Physical Education. Physiology and Hygiene.... 3 

♦Sociology 1. Social Relations 1 

♦English 1 2 

♦English 2 2 

Education 3. Supervised Study 4 

Art 5. Drawing Methods 2 

Physical Education 3. Teachers' Physical 

Education 2 

Electives 9 

Total 32 

Senior Year 
♦Education 6. School Management and School 

Hygiene 4 hours 

♦Education 9. Observation and Teaching 5 

♦Education 8. Tests and Measurements 2 

Education 5. Intermediate Methods 4 

English 4. Children's Literature 2 

Music 4. Music Methods 2 

Biology 2. Nature Study 2 

Electives 11 

Total 32 



42 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Junior High School Curriculum 

Junior Year 

*Education 1. Introduction to Teaching 3 hours 

*Education 2. Educational Psychology 4 

* Physical Education 1. Physiology and Hygiene 3 

♦Sociology 1. Social Relations * 1 

♦English 1 ,. 2 

♦English 2 ,„ 2 

Physical Education 4. Teachers' Physical 

Education , 2 

Electives 15 

Total 32 

Senior Year 
♦Education 6. School Management and School 

Hygiene 4 hours 

♦Education 9. Observation and Teaching 5 

♦Education 8. Tests and Measurements..., 2 

Education 7. The Junior High School 2 

Education 20. Methods of Teaching in Sec. 

Schools , 4 

Electives 15 

Total .• 32 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 43 



DESCRIPTIVE OUTLINE OF COURSES 

Unless otherwise stated, the credit value of the course is 
identical with the number of hours per week that the 
class meets. 

Courses from one to nineteen are considered to be 
Junior and Senior Normal level or Freshman and Soph- 
omore College level. Courses numbered from twenty on 
are considered to be Junior and Senior College level. 

The following outline does not attempt to list the spring 
and summer school courses, except in those instances 
where "Sp" or "S" is placed after the numerical desig- 
nation of the course. The spring and summer school 
courses are all, with infrequent exceptions, chosen from 
the regular courses. 

The abbreviations "M", "T", "W", "Th", "F", indicate 
the days on which the class meets. The figures "8:15", 
"9:10", etc. indicate the hours at which the class begins. 
The schedule, therefore, is definitely made for 1924-25, 
and will not be changed except for very strong reasons. 

EDUCATION 

Mr. Shreve Mr. White Miss Hull Miss Gibson 

Education 1 — Introduction to Teaching. 

Three hours, first semester. First section, 11:00, M, 
T, Th; second section, 1:00, M, T, Th; third section, 
1:55, M, T, Th. Required in all the curricula. The 
aim of this course is to acquaint the student with the 
general field of education and thus provide a basis for 
the wise selection of the type of educational service 
for which he desires to prepare himself. Each student 
is confronted with the practical problem of choosing the 
curriculum which he will pursue throughout the re- 
mainder of his life in the school. — Mr. White. 



44 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Education 2A — Elementary Educational Psychology. 

Four hours, first semester. First section, 10:05, M, T, 
W, F; second section, 11:00, M, T, Th, F. Required in 
all the Normal curricula. In this course the student 
is introduced to the principles of learning and teaching 
through reading, class discussions, and experiments. 
Some attention will be given to the native equipment 
of the pupil, to individual differences, physical tests, 
and to grading and the distribution of marks. — Mr. 
Shreve. 

Education 2B — Elementary Educational Psychology. 

Four hours, second semester. 11:00, M, T, Th, F. This 
course is a repetition of 2A. — Mr. Shreve. 

Education 3 — Supervised Study. 

Four hours, second semester. 8:15, T, W, Th, F. Re- 
quired in the primary and intermediate curricula. This 
course is organized around a few main topics: the 
meaning of supervised study, types of classroom activ- 
ities, the essential factors of each type of exercise, how 
to supervise each type. A minimum of one hour a week 
of observation in the training school is required in this 
course. — Miss Hull and Miss Gibson. 

Education 4 — Primary Methods. 

Four hours, first semester. 8:15, T, W, Th, F. Re- 
quired in the primary curriculum. This course is de- 
voted to a consideration of methods of teaching in the 
primary grades. How to teach reading, arithmetic, 
spelling, handwriting, and other subjects will be con- 
sidered, as time permits. — Miss Gibson. 

Education 5 — Intermediate Methods. 

Four hours, first semester. 8:15, T, W, Th, F. Re- 
quired in the intermediate curriculum. The aim of 
this course is to prepare for effective teaching in the 
intermediate grades. The following subjects will be 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 45 

considered : reading, history, geography, arithmetic, and 
language. — Miss Hull. 

Education 6A — School Management and School Hygiene. 

Four hours, first semester. 10:05, M, T, W, F. Re- 
quired in all the Normal curricula. This course deals 
primarily with the problems of classroom management, 
but some attention is given to the more general prob- 
lems of administration and supervision. About one- 
fourth of the time will be devoted to school hygiene. — 
Mr. White. 

Education 6B — School Management and School Hygiene. 

Four hours, second semester. 1:00, M, T, W, Th. This 
course is a repetition of 6A. — Mr. White. 

Education 7 — The Junior High School. 

Two hours, second semester. 2:50, M, W. Required 
in the junior high school curriculum. This course deals 
with the aims and functions of the junior high school. — 
Mr. White. 

Education 8A — Tests and Measurements in the Elementary 
School. 

Two hours, first semester. 1:00, W. F. Required in all 
the Normal curricula. The aim of this course is to 
introduce the student to the recent developments in the 
field of scientific measurements, and to develop the 
ability to utilize the standard tests as a means of im- 
proving instruction. — Mr. White. 

Education 8B — Tests and Measurements in the Elementary 
School. 

Two hours, second semester. 2:50, T, Th. This course 
is a repetition of 8A. — Mr. White. 



46 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Education 9A — Observation and Teaching. 

Five hours, first semester. Hours to be arranged. (It 
requires a double period for the course in Education 
9.) Required in all the Normal curricula. This 
course consists of observation and practice teaching in 
the training school under the supervision of a training 
teacher. A minimum of ninety clock hours of obser- 
vation and teaching is required of each student. The 
student must do at least sixty hours of actual teaching. 
— Miss Hull and Miss Gibson. 

Education 9B — Observation and Teaching. 

Five hours, second semester. Hours to be arranged. 
This course is the same as 9A. One-half the seniors 
will enroll for 9A the first semester and the other half 
for 9B the second semester. — Miss Hull and Miss Gib- 
son. 

Education 20 — Methods of Teaching in Secondary Schools. 

Four hours, first semester. 8:15, T, W, Th, F. Re- 
quired in the junior high school and in the college curri- 
cula. The aim of this course is to prepare the student 
for effective teaching in the secondary school. The 
point of view is that of directing the learning activities 
of pupils. A minimum of one hour a week of observa- 
tion in the training school will be required in connection 
with this course. — Mr. Shreve. 

Education 21 — Advanced Educational Psychology. 

Four hours, second semester. 8:15, T, W, Th, F. Re- 
quired of all college students in the junior or senior 
year. This course is organized around a series of prob- 
lems. Each student will investigate the problems as- 
signed and report his findings to the class for discussion 
and evaluation. — Mr. Shreve. 

Education 22 — The Principles of Secondary Education. 

Four hours, first semester. 1:00, T, W, Th, F. Re- 
quired of all college students in the junior or senior 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 47 

year. This course will consist of a series of problems 
covering the more important phases of secondary edu- 
cation. Each student will be assigned a number of 
problems for investigation. — Mr. Shreve. 

Education 23 — School Administration and Supervision. 

Four hours, second semester. 9:10, M, W, Th, F. This 
course is designed to meet the needs of those preparing 
for administrative and supervisory positions. The first 
half of the course will deal with the problems of school 
administration, and the second half with the supervision 
of instruction. — Mr. White. 

Education 24 — Observation and Directed Teaching. 

Five hours, first or second semester, for ten or twelve 
weeks. Three hours' credit. Hours to be arranged. 
Required of all college students in the senior year. 
The student will observe and teach in the high school 
under the direction of the department of education or 
the major professor. — Mr. Shreve or Major Professor. 

Education 25 — Educational Sociology. 

Four hours, second semester. 1:00, M, T, Th, F. In 
this course an attempt is made to apply the principles 
of sociology to the solution of educational problems. 
The discussions will center around two main problems: 
the sociological foundations of Education, and sociolog- 
ical foundations of the school subjects. — Mr. Shreve. 

Education 26 — Tests and Measurements in the Secondary 
School. (Omitted in 1924-25.) 

Four hours, second semester. Required in all college 
students in the junior or senior year. The main topics 
are: the measurement of mental ability, tests for use 
in secondary schools, and statistical methods applied to 
education. — Mr. White. 



48 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

ENGLISH 

Mr. Barnes Mrs. Morrow Miss Lewis Mr. Opp 

Courses required for English majors are marked with 
an asterisk. 

English 1 and 2 will be waived upon satisfactory en- 
trance examinations. 

* English 1 A— English Oral Arts. 

Four hours, first semester, for half the semester. Two 
hours credit. First section, 10:05, M, T, W, F, first 
half semester; second section, 11:00, M, T, Th, F, last 
half semester; third section, 1:00, M, T, Th, F, first half 
semester. Required in all courses. This course includes 
all the elementary phases of oral language training 
needed by teachers; enunciation, voice training, public 
speaking, reading aloud, etc. — Mr. Opp. 

* English IB— English Oral Arts. 

Four hours, second semester, for half the semester. 
Two hours' credit. First section, 9:10, M, T, W, Th, 
first half semester; second section, 11:00, M, T, Th, F, 
last half semester. A repetition of English 1A. — Mr. 
Opp. 

*English 2A— English Writing Arts. 

Four hours, first semester, for half the semester. Two 
hours' credit. First section, 10:05, M, T, W, F, last 
half semester; second section, 11:00, M, T, Th, F, first 
half semester; third section, 1:00, M, T, Th, F, last half 
semester. Required in all the courses. A study of punc- 
tuation, capitalization, spelling, and outlining, as well as 
form, neatness, etc.; themes twice a week. — Miss Lewis. 

* English 2B— English Writing Arts. 

Four hours, second semester, for half the semester. 
Two hours' credit. First section, 9:10, M, T, W, Th, 
last half semester; second section, 11:00, M, T, Th, F, 
first half semester. A repetition of English 2A. — Miss 
Lewis. 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 49 

English 3— Story Telling. 

Two hours, second semester. 2:50, M, W. Required in 
the primary curriculum of the standard Normal course. 
Study of the nature and structure of children's stories, 
selection of stories, and much training in the telling of 
stories. — Mr. Opp. 

English 4 — Children's Literature. 

Two hours, first semester. 11:00, M, Th. Required in 
the primary and intermediate curricula of the standard 
Normal course. A survey of the entire field of prose 
and poetry available and suitable for children in the 
elementary school. — Mr. Barnes. 

English 5 — Grammar. 

Two hours, first semester. 9:10, W, F. Designed for 
those who expect to teach English in the upper grades 
or junior high school. This course is designed to give 
teachers knowledge of the fundamentals of grammar. — 
Miss Lewis. 

English 6 — Juvenile Literature. 

Two hours, first semester. 11:00, T, F. Designed for 
those who expect to teach literature in the upper grades 
or junior high school. A survey of the best literature 
available for children in the upper grades, with special 
emphasis on literature for silent, home reading. — Mr. 
Barnes. 

English 7 — Teaching English in Upper Grades. 

Two hours, second semester. 11:00, M, Th. Designed 
for those who expect to teach English in the upper 
grades or junior high school. Study of the modern 
method of teaching the English subjects. Mr. Barnes. 



50 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

English 8 — Composition. 

Three hours, first semester. 9:10, M, T, Th. Designed 
to train Freshman and Sophomore students in the art 
of expressing their experiences, observations and re- 
flections, in a clear and pleasing manner. Opportunity 
will be given for selecting the form and style best 
suited to the students' ability and preference. Pre- 
requisite, English 2. — Miss Lewis. 

*English 10 — Recent Fiction. 

Three hours, first semester. 8:15, T, Th, F. Required 
of English majors. Steady reading of the best of 
British and American fiction of our times, with collat- 
eral study of the larger literary movements in fiction. — 
Mr. Mercer. 

* English 11 — Recent Poetry. 

Two hours, second semester. 9:10, T, Th. Required of 
English majors. Reading of much contemporary poetry, 
with discussions and lectures on the new poetry move- 
ment. — Mr. Barnes. , 

English 12 — The Modern American Magazine. 

Two hours, first semester. 1:55, M, W. Required of 
English majors. Reading of the best of the popular 
and literary magazines of today, with the effort to 
appraise and classify them. — Miss Lewis. 



English 13 — Recent Drama. 

Two hours, second semester. Required of English 
majors. Study of many recent plays, British, Conti- 
nental and American. — Mr. Opp. 

English 24S— American Literature From 1870 to 1900. 

Four hours, summer, two hours credit. A survey of the 
last thirty years before nineteen hundred in American 
literature. Much reading in all the principal authors. — 
Mrs, Morrow. 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 51 

*English 25 — Victorian Literature. 

Four hours, first semester. 11:00, M, T, Th, F. Re- 
quired of English majors. A survey study of the 
essays and of the fiction and poetry of the nineteenth 
century. — Mrs. Morrow. 

English 26 S — Introduction to Tennyson. 

Four hours, summer, two hours credit. Wide reading 
of much of Tennyson's verse, close reading of typical 
masterpieces. — Mr. Barnes. 

English 27S — Introduction to Browning. 

Four hours, summer, two hours credit. This course is 
designed to acquaint the student with many of Brown- 
ing's best verse and to give him training in interpreting 
Browning. — Mr. Barnes. 

English 28 — Wordsworth as Poet and Educator. (Omitted 
in 1924-25.) 

Two hours, second semester. Wide reading in Words- 
worth, with special emphasis upon those poems which 
contain educational ideas. — Mr. Barnes. 

English 29 — The Classical Age in English Literature. 

Two hours, second semester. 1:55, M, W. Steady read- 
ing, for appreciation and comparative study, of the 
works of the chief writers of the eighteenth century, 
from Dryden to Goldsmith. — Miss Lewis. 

English 30— Milton's Poetry. 

Two hours, first semester. 9:10, T, Th. Careful study, 
from a literary and linguistic standpoint, of "Comus", 
and "Paradise Lost", and the minor poems. — Mr. 
Barnes. 

*English 31 — Shakespeare. 

Four hours, second semester. 10:05, M, T, W, F. Re- 
quired of English majors. Reading of ten of the prin- 



52 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

cipal plays, with emphasis upon the literary and dra- 
matic elements. — Mrs. Morrow. 

♦English 32— Middle English. 

Three hours, second semester. 9:10, M, W, F. Re- 
quired of English majors. Study of the chief writers 
of the middle English period, with chief emphasis on 
Chaucer, Langland, and Gower. This is primarily a 
course in the English language. — Mr. Barnes. 

English 33— The Short Story. 

Two hours, second semester. 1:00, T, Th. Much read- 
ing of specimens of the classic short-story, considered 
as a type of prose narrative. — Miss Lewis. 

English 33— The Bible. 

Four hours, first semester. 10:05, M, T, W, F. The 
aim of this course is to indicate the main literary types 
found in the Bible and to familiarize the student with 
the wealth and variety of its literature. A general 
knowledge of the Bible as a whole — its theme, structure, 
and books — will be given, but emphasis will be placed 
upon the literary elements in the Old Testament. — Mrs. 
Morrow. 

English 34— The New Testament. 

Three hours, second semester. 11:00, M, T, F. An 
intensive study of the literary types and elements in the 
New Testament. — Mrs. Morrow. 

English 35 — Nature in Poetry. 

Two hours, first semester. 9:10, W, F. A careful 
study of nature as interpreted by Wordsworth, Byron, 
Shelley, Bryant, and Lowell. — Mrs. Morrow. 

* English 39 — Survey of British and American Literature. 

Four hours, first semester. 1:00, M, T, W, Th. Re- 
quired of English majors. In this course, which should 
be taken in the senior college year, the student is given 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 53 

a chronological survey of the entire field of British and 
American literature, from the earliest times down to 
the present. Prerequisites: English 10, 11, 25, 32. — 
Mrs. Morrow. 

English 40 — Narrative and Descriptive Writing. 

Two hours, second semester. 1:55, T, Th. An ad- 
vanced course, designed to give especially talented stu- 
dents an opportunity to receive training in these types 
of writing. — Miss Lewis. 

English 41 — Expository Writing. 

Three hours, second semester. Designed to train stu- 
dents in the making of expositions and the writing of 
papers upon themes of some difficulty. — Mr. Barnes. 

*English 42 — Public Speaking. 

Two hours, second semester. 1:00, M, W. Required of 
English majors. This course, to be taken in either the 
junior or senior college year, is designed to give stu- 
dents training in the art of preparing and delivering 
public speeches. — Mr. Opp. 

English 45 — Dramatization and Play Production. 

Two hours, first semester. 9:10, T, Th. The coach- 
ing and presenting of plays. This course is designed 
to acquaint students with the art of dramatic expres- 
sion and pageantry, to equip them to select plays and 
adapt material, and to carry on dramatic activities in 
schools where they teach. — Mr. Opp. 

English 46 — Extra-Curricular English Activities. 

Two hours, either semester. Hours to be arranged. 
An informal and flexible course. Any student or group 
of students engaged in activities which develop speech 
and literary ability, may, upon request, receive instruc- 
tion in, supervision of, and credit for this work. The 
amount of credit is to be determined by the supervisor, 



54 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

but shall not exceed two hours in any one semester nor 
more than six hours in all. Organization is as follows: 

46 (A). Oratory and Debate — Practical oratory and 
debate. Speech training. Should be taken by those 
interested in public speaking and those students desir- 
ing to participate in intercollegiate debate and orator- 
ical contests. 

46 (B). Journalism — Work is designed to enable 
students to acquire journalistic style and skill in news- 
paper-writing and reporting. Should be taken by those 
desiring to work on the staff of the school paper. 

46 (C). Dramatics — Dramatic expression, theory and 
practice. Participation in the productions of the dra- 
matic club. Should be taken by members of the dra- 
matic club desiring instruction and training for credit. 

46 (D). Story Telling — The aim of this work is to 
acquaint students with the art of story telling in the 
school, community-club, or in play-ground work. A 
story telling club will facilitate this work. — Mr Opp. 

*English 47 — Teaching English in the High School. 

Two hours, second semester. 11:00, T, F. Required of 
English majors. Study of the modern method of teach- 
ing both literature and English language in the high 
school. Prerequisite or parallel: English 39. — Mr. 
Barnes. 

English 48 — Advanced Writing. 

Two hours, first semester. 1:55, M, W. This course is 
designed for those who wish to make writing a profes- 
sional art. All the forms of discourse and the chief 
literary types will be included. Verse-making, report- 
ing, editorial writing, will be taken up. Prerequisites: 
English 2, 8, and either 40 or 41. — Miss Lewis. 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 55 

HISTORY 

Mr. Stewart Miss Prichard 

Courses marked with a star are required of History 
majors. 

History Al — Grecian History. 

Four hours, first semester. 11:00, M, T, Th, F. De- 
signed for college freshmen and sophomores. The aim 
is to trace the development of ancient civilization to its 
culmination in Athens in the Periclean Age, to discover 
the causes of the fall of Greece, and what were her 
gifts to world civilization; will trace Grecian history to 
the death of Alexander the Great. — Mr. Stewart. 

History A2 — Roman History. 

Four hours, second semester. 11:00, M, T, Th, F. De- 
signed for college freshmen and sophomores. The par- 
ticular aim in this course is to trace the development 
and decline of the Roman Empire, particular attention 
being given to Roman political institutions and Roman 
law. Beginning with the earliest times the history of 
Rome will be followed to 565, A. D. — Mr. Stewart. 

History CI — Modern European History. 

Three hours, first semester. 1:00, M, T, Th, F. De- 
signed primarily for freshmen and sophomores. The 
aim of the course is to give the students an apprecia- 
tion of the conditions which were antecedent to and 
responsible for the Great War and a general knowledge 
of conditions as they are today in Europe. The course 
includes a study of the movements of the important 
periods in the history of Europe from 1492 to the pres- 
ent time. — Miss Prichard. 

History C2 — Modern European History. 

Three hours, second semester. 1:00, M, T, Th, F. A 
continuation of CI. — Miss Prichard. 



56 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

History C20— Antecedents of the World War. 

Three hours, second semester. 1:55, M, W. F. De- 
signed for college juniors and seniors. History of Eu- 
rope since 1870 with special reference to international 
relations. The course will deal with international al- 
liances and rivalries following the Franco-Prussian 
War, economic and political expansion and the new im- 
perialism, the diplomatic background of the World War, 
the war and the treaties of peace, efforts at reconstruc- 
tion and the new Europe. — Mr. Stewart. 

History D20 — English Social and Industrial History. 

Four hours, second semester. 9:10, M, T, Th, F. Pri- 
marily for freshmen and sophomores. The aim of the 
course is to give to the student an appreciation of the 
importance and significance of the present day social and 
economic conditions and movements in England. A 
brief summary of the social and economic background 
of England prior to the eighteenth century — a topical 
presentation of the social and economic developments 
in England beginning with the eighteenth century. — 
Miss Prichard. 

* History El — American History. 

Three hours, first semester. 8:15, T, W, Th, F. The 
aim is to acquaint the student with the great national 
achievements to the time of the Civil War. Attention 
given to European conditions behind the New World 
movement, a brief sketch of colonial, political and social 
conditions. The latter part of the course will be con- 
cerned with the growth of democracy in the early re- 
public, westward extension, and the development of the 
slavery controversy. — Mr. Stewart. 

* History E2 — American History. 

Three hours, second semester. 8:15, T, W, Th, F. A 
continuation of El. Beginning with the Civil War this 
course will trace political and social developments, in- 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 57 

creasing importance of the United States in interna- 
tional politics, and her participation in the World War. 
— Mr. Stewart. 

History E20 — Economic and Social History of the United 
States. 

Four hours, first semester. 9:10, M, T, Th, F. De- 
signed primarily for freshmen and sophomores. The 
aim is to acquaint the student with the importance and 
significance of present day social and economic move- 
ments. A topical presentation of the social and eco- 
nomic development of our country's history. — Miss 
Prichard. 

History E22 — Latin-American History. 

Four hours, first semester. 1:55, M, T, W, Th. De- 
signed for juniors and seniors who are majoring in 
History. The aim of the course will be to present to 
the student the material for forming a clear concep- 
tion of the position and importance of the Latin 
American states in the political and economic life of 
the Western Hemisphere. Chief emphasis upon the 
period since the states gained their independence from 
Spain; special attention to diplomatic and other rela- 
tions with the United States. Prerequisite: History 
El and E2. — Mr. Stewart. 

*History 23 — The Teaching of History in the High School. 

Three hours, first semester. 2:50, M, T, Th. Designed 
for those seniors, normal and college, who are prepar- 
ing to teach History in Junior or Senior High Schools. 
A consideration of aims in history, the history recita- 
tion; teaching pupils to study; general and special meth- 
ods of procedure; supplementary reading and illustra- 
tive material; note book and written work; teaching 
current events. Prerequisite: History El and E2, or 
the equivalent. — Mr. Stewart. 



58 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

SOCIOLOGY 

Mr. Stewart Mr. Lively Miss Ice Miss Prichard 

Sociology 1A — Social Relations. 

One hour, first semester. First section, 9:15, W; sec- 
ond section, 1:00, W. Required in Normal course. 
This course is a study of social customs and social 
problems. The material of this course is divided into 
two main groups of problems — first discussion of theo- 
ries and principles of social relations — second, studies 
of practical problems. — Miss Prichard. 

Sociology IB — Social Relations. 

One hour, second semester. First section, 9:15, W; 
second section, 1:00, W. A repetition of Sociology 1A. 
— Miss Prichard. 

Sociology 2 — Rural Sociology. 

Four hours, second semester. 10:05, M, T, W, F. This 
course is a treatment of such rural institutions as the 
church, the home, and the school. It discusses the rural, 
social and economic problems growing out of such topics 
as good roads, farm organizations, social life, recrea- 
tion, isolation, religious life, education, with sugges- 
tions for their solution. Emphasis is placed upon edu- 
cational agencies. — Miss Ice. 

Sociology 3 — Introduction to General Sociology. 

Four hours, first semester. 10:05, M, T, W, F. This 
course is designed to give the student an intelligent 
understanding and a working system of thought about 
society and social origins. The elementary phases of 
the development of society, its institutions and working 
conditions are studied. Social control and social prog- 
ress and the general relations of society to standards of 
authority. — Mr. Lively. 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 59 

Sociology 20 — General Sociology. 

Four hours, second semester. 10:05, M, T, W, F. The 
course in General Sociology is designed for more ad- 
vanced students. The general applications of sociolo- 
gical concepts to human problems such as movements 
of population, general migrations, immigration, poverty, 
crime, race prejudice, marriage, divorce, the family, 
feeble mindedness, the general pathological problems of 
our social structure and the inter-dependence of modern 
society are discussed. — Mr. Lively. 

Sociology 23 — Immigration. 

Four hours, second semester. 2:50, M, T, W, Th. The 
aim of this course is to make plain the problem in 
American life presented by the incoming stream of im- 
migration. A study of the causes favoring the migra- 
tion of peoples, and the results of such movements; 
special emphasis upon training for citizenship and the 
means of remedying the ills accompanying immigration 
movements. Prerequisite: Sociology 3. — Mr. Stewart. 

AGRICULTURE 

Mr. Lively 

Agriculture 3 — Agriculture. 

Five hours, first semester; four hours credit; 1:00, M, 
T, Th, F, and W, 2:50-3:45. The real problems of the 
West Virginia farmer are taken up in the most prac- 
tical way. Seed selection, testing, harvesting and stor- 
ing of grains and forage crops, feeding and care of ani- 
mals, and the ordinary practical principles of dairying 
are features of the work. The care and value of man- 
ures, use of fertilizers, soil studies and preparation, 
planting and care of the orchard are made clear by 
actual demonstration. Special emphasis is given to the 
nature and control of the common pests and diseases of 
farm crops. Constant use is made of government bulle- 
tins, farm journals, etc. Prerequisites: Chemistry 1 
and 2. 



60 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Agriculture 20 — Vegetable Gardening. 

Five hours, second semester; four hours credit; 1:00, 
M, T, Th, F, and W, 2:50-3:45. This course is to give 
special training in selecting and care of seeds and other 
parts of plants used for propagation. The preparation 
of soils, fertilizer values, general care of garden vege- 
tables and small fruits are given special emphasis. 
The harvesting and storing of various kinds of garden 
crops furnishes a part of the exercise. Class discus- 
sion, laboratory demonstrations, assigned reading, and 
garden work make up most of the course. The school 
now has six acres of ground under cultivation, especially 
for this work. 

Agriculture 22 — Farm Management and Farm Economics. 

Three hours, first semester. 11:00, M, T, Th. This 
course attempts to familiarize the student with the 
economic principles and problems that vitally concern 
farmers, together with the economic factors affecting 
the organization and operation of the farm. Prere- 
quisite: Agriculture 3. 

Agriculture 24S — Orcharding. 

Four hours, summer, two hours credit. Selection of 
orchard sites and preparation of ground; selection, 
planting, and arrangement of garden and field fruits; 
harvesting, packing, and shipping fruits. 

BIOLOGY 

Mr. Lively Miss Ross 

Biology 1 — Nature Study in Primary Grades. 

Two hours, second semester. 3:45, M, W. Required 
in primary curriculum of standard Normal course. De- 
signed to acquaint primary teachers with those phenom- 
ena of mineral, vegetable, and animal life that are of 
especial interest to children. — Misss Ross. 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 61 

Biology 2 — Nature Study in Intermediate Grades. 

Two hours, second semester. 3:45, T, Th. Required in 
intermediate curriculum of standard Normal course. 
Designed to acquaint intermediate grade teachers with 
the physical environment of children. The course in- 
cludes work in all the natural sciences : Botany, Chem- 
istry, Agriculture, Astronomy, etc. — Miss Ross. 

Biology 3 — Introduction to Botany. 

Four hours, first semester; three hours credit. 1:55, 
M, W, and T, 2:50-3:45. A general survey of plant life 
and specific studies of representative groups of each 
sub-kingdom, as to life habits, morphology, etc. — Mr. 
Lively. 

Biology 4 — General Botany. 

Four hours, second semester; three hours credit. 1:55, 
M, W, and T, 2:50-3:45. A study of the general func- 
tions of plants, their structure, reproduction, and ecol- 
ogical relationships, with special reference to economic 
value. — Mr. Lively. 

Biology 21 — Bacteriology. 

Three hours, first semester. 8:15, T, Th, F. A study 
of bacteria, yeasts, molds, and closely related fungi, as 
to their forms, methods of feeding, and reproduction; 
also their classification, extent, and manner of distri- 
bution, and their importance in relation to foods and 
health. — Miss Ross. 

Biology 22 — General Biology. 

Four hours, second semester. 8:15, T, W, Th, F. Life 
history and general relationships of plants and animals; 
their structure, functions, and evolutionary develop- 
ment. — Miss Ross. 

CHEMISTRY 

Mr. Rogers 

The schedule of courses in Chemistry is given on pages 
64 and 65. This includes laboratory hours. 



62 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Chemistry 1 — General Chemistry. 

Five hours, first semester. Four hours credit. This 
course attacks and applies the general facts and prin- 
ciples of chemistry in a more thoroughgoing way than is 
possible with the beginner in high school chemistry. 
The aim is to put the student in sufficient command of 
a knowledge of chemical phenomena as that knowledge 
shall be of practical use. (The first section of this 
course is designed for those who present high school 
Chemistry for entrance; the second section for those 
who do not.) 

Chemistry 2 — General Chemistry. 

Five hours, second semester. Four hours credit. A 
continuation of Chemistry 1. Prerequisite: Chemistry 1. 

Chemistry 20 — Elementary Qualitative Chemical Analysis. 

Six hours, second semester. Three hours credit. This 
course trains the student to determine the composition 
of substances by a carefully arranged sequence of ex- 
periments. It is an essential preparation for more ad- 
vanced courses in chemistry. It furnishes a review of 
the earlier work. Prerequisites: Chemistry 1 and 2. 
Three double periods must be reserved for laboratory 
work. 

Chemistry 21 — Elementary Quantitative Analysis. 

Seven hours, first semester. Four hours credit. Both 
gravimetric and volumetric methods are included in the 
work of this course. Prerequisites: Chemistry 1 and 2. 
Mathematics 3, 4 and 5. This course consists princi- 
pally of laboratory work, for which three double periods 
are required. 

Chemistry 23 — Elementary Organic Chemistry. 

Three hours, first semester. The object of this course 
is to give a general idea of the chemistry of the carbon 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 63 

compounds. Attention is given to the practical appli- 
cations rather than to the theoretical considerations of 
organic chemistry. The course will answer the needs 
of students preparing to enter medical schools, but it is 
recommended to students of dietetics, agriculture and 
biology. Prerequisites: Chemistry 1 and 2. 

Chemistry 23L — Experimental Organic Chemistry. 

Two hours, first semester. One hour credit. This 
course is intended to accompany Chemistry 23 and 
should be taken by premedical students. It involves 
simple experiments representing the typical reactions 
of the more important classes of organic substances. 
Prerequisites: Chemistry 1, 2, 20 and 21. 

Chemistry 24 — Elementary Physical Chemistry. 

Five hours, second semester. Four hours credit. Some 
of the topics included in this course are properties of 
dissolved substances, theremo-chemistry, colloids, elec- 
tro-chemistry, photo-chemistry, and radio-activity. Lec- 
tures, demonstrations and laboratory work. Prerequi- 
sites: Chemistry 1, 2, 20 and 21; Mathematics 3, 4 
and 5. 

Chemistry 25A — Teaching of Chemistry and Related 
Sciences. 

Four hours, first semester. Two hours credit. Open 
to a limited number of students. Prerequisites: Chem- 
istry 1, 2, 21 and 22. This course will include practice 
in construction of demonstration apparatus, efficient 
handling of laboratory equipment and the problems pe- 
culiar to laboratory instruction; a study of the educa- 
tional values of chemistry, and the most approved 
methods and devices for presenting the science to begin- 
ners. The reading of chemical journals and other ref- 
erence work in the library is included. 

Chemistry 25B — Teaching of Chemistry. 

Four hours, second semester. A repetition of Chemistry 
25A. 



64 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



> 

QC 

I 

Ul 

X 
o 

S b 







b 
.a 

I 

,4 
Q 








« 




a; 

of 

1 

o 

5 

.a 
a 
M 
o 




1 


1.2 

6c» 


{! 

11 

JS o 
CO 




•i-i 
11 


s 


>> 

2 

o 

a 

1 
1 

6 


>> 
g 

1 

| 

33 
O 




CM 

I 

1 


1 

b 

1 

.a 
o 


o 
o 


3 
.1 

■£ 9 

1:1 

Is 




o 


h 

a. J 

JS s 


i 

■11 

£1 


5 

.3 

a 

i 


5^ 
11 

61 


00 


CO 
C<l 

b 
1 

J 


S3 

.a 
1 

6 




8 
b 

I 
6 




! 
i 


1 


1 

i 


I 

§ 



-a 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



65 



» 




b 

o 








ca 




o 

J! 

cm 










cm 


SI 






in 


CD 


b 

.2 


1 
















*" 


1 


a 

cp 


a 

cp 


CM 






-a 


*a 


J 


.2 






O 


O 


o 


as 








pq 








<M 


£. 


CM 


<m" 


CM 


§ 


^C 


is c 


£<M 


>> 


>> 
^3<M 


.2 C 


.2 £ 


.2 c 


.2 


.2 C 


r ~ 


a -2 

43 CD 


a^ 


a- a 


1 


a -J 
51 




jz o 


6i 


43 




Qco 


OO 


O 


Ora 










o 












<M 




o 
o 


>> 


>» 




b 




»" 


o 


o 




a 

CP 




*~ 


1 


c3 








o 


O 




^a 






-i 


C3 




O 






►J 

o" 
















o 




<M 


CM 


^ 




CM 


o 


>> 


>> 


J 




b 


o 


1 


CO 

a 


-r 




.2 

a 




cp 


u> 






<D 




M 


.a 


.2 




M 




O 


O 






o 














CM 




cm" 


CM 


CM 




£> 




>>« 


>> 


>> 


o 






-fa a 


B~* 


-*3 *"* 




.2 c 




.2 o 


.2 S3 


.2 g 


o> 


1.2 


*-• 


a'§ 


go 


a -2 




5§ 


1 

CD 


5-H 

OQ 


J 1 








ZO 












cm" 








IO 




SI 

.2 © 








00 




a'2 
65 














>» 








>> 


>> 




>> 






03 


cc3 


cp 


T3 


>> 




T3 


13 


a 


S 








<P 


i 


9 


rs 




£ 


£ 


£ 



66 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



GEOGRAPHY 

Miss Ross 

Geography 1 — Elements of Geography. 

Four hours, first semester. Three hours credit. Rec- 
itation 11:00, T, Th, and one two-hour laboratory or 
field period, hours to be arranged. A preliminary 
course of practical value. It is a systematic study of 
land forms: their changes and their influence on man. 
Topics: Earth: forces and processes of changing land 
surface; soils; brief history of earth; physiographic 
features, their influence on man. 

Geography 2 — Fundamentals of Regional Geography. 

Four hours, second semester. Three hours credit. 
Recitation 11:00, T, Th, and one two-hour laboratory or 
field period, hours to be arranged. A study based on 
the climatic regions of North America as type regions. 
Topics: Weather; climate; climatic regions; plant 
geography; distribution of population; occupations in 
relation to climate and density of population. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Domestic Science, Miss Lanham 
Domestic Art, Miss Compton 

The schedule of courses in Home Economics is to be 
found on pages 72-75. This includes both recitation and 
laboratory hours. Courses marked with stars are re- 
quired of majors in Home Economics. 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 07 

Home Economics 1 — Foods and Cookery. 

Five hours, first semester. Three hours credit. A 
study of foods in relation to source, composition, char- 
acteristics, nutritive value, digestion, cost and place in 
the daily diet. Special attention given to the develop- 
ment of ease and accuracy in the cooking of type foods, 
and to gaining definite standards for prepared dishes 
of these foods. Not required of students who have had 
two years Domestic Science in high school. One lec- 
ture period and two two-hour laboratory periods. 

Home Economics 2 — Foods and Cookery. 

Five hours, second semester. Three hours credit. Con- 
tinuation of Home Economics 1. 

*Home Economics 20 — Foods and Cookery. 

Five hours, first semester. Three hours credit. A gen- 
eral review of fundamental principles of cookery, and 
a study of foods. Special attention is given to market- 
ing, the planning, cooking and serving of meals. Re- 
quires demonstration such as is useful in teaching 
cooking. Required of Home Economics majors. Pre- 
requisites or parallels: Chemistry 1 and 2. 

Home Economics 21 — Foods and Cookery. 

Three hours, second semester. Continuation of Home 
Economics 20. One lecture period and two two-hour 
laboratory periods. Prerequisite: Home Economics 1 
and 2. 

*Home Economics 25 — Nutrition and Dietetics. 

Three hours, first semester. Two and one-half hours of 
credit. A study of the nutritive value of foods and 



68 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

the food requirement of the normal body. Practical ap- 
plication of the principles of nutrition in planning 
dietaries for the individual and family. Special atten- 
tion given to the feeding of school children and infants. 
Prerequisites: Physical Education 1, and Home Econ- 
omics 1 and 2, or 20 and 21. Two lectures and one 
one-hour laboratory period. Required of Home Econ- 
omics majors. 

*Home Economics 26 — Housewifery. 

Three hours, second semester. Two and one-half hours 
credit. A course that aims to teach the students how 
to reduce the household tasks so as to save time, money 
and energy. Discussion and laboratory. Two discus- 
sion hours. One one-hour laboratory. Prerequisite or 
parallel : Home Economics 29. Required of Home Econ- 
omics majors. 

*Home Economics 31 — Home Nursing. 

Two hours, second semester. Cause and prevention of 
sickness. The nurse, the care of the patient and the 
sickroom. Communicable diseases and emergencies. 
Prerequisite: Home Economics 22. 

Home Economics 3 — Elementary Sewing. 

Five hours, first semester. Three hours credit. One 
class hour and two two-hour laboratory periods. Not 
required of those who have had two years of sewing 
in high school. The aim of this course is to give the 
foundation of plain sewing. Color and line problems as 
related to dress will be studied. Emphasis is placed 
upon the history and uses of the various textile fibers. 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 69 

Home Economics 4 — Elementary Sewing. 

Five hours, second semester. Three hours credit. One 
class hour and two two-hour laboratory periods. Pre- 
requisite: Home Economics 3. 

*Home Economics 22 — Advanced Sewing. 

Five hours, first semester. Three hours credit. One 
class hour and two two-hour laboratory periods. Re- 
quired of Home Economics majors. This course aims 
to present the principles necessary for practical dress- 
making, including some problems in tailoring. A de- 
tailed study of various textile fibers is given. Prere- 
quisites: Home Economics 3 and 4, or similar courses. 

Home Economics 23 — Advanced Sewing. 

Five hours, second semester. Three hours credit. One 
class hour and two two-hour laboratory periods. A con- 
tinuation of Home Economics 22. 

*Home Economics 24 A — Costume Design. 

Five hours, first semester. Three hours credit. One 
class hour and two two-hour laboratory periods. Re- 
quired of Home Economics majors. This course aims 
to give opportunity for individual expression of artistic 
taste in dress. Simple drafting system will be used. 
Careful study of clothing budget will also be made. 
Prerequisites: Home Economics 23 and Art 1. 

Home Economics 24B — Costume Design. 

Five hours, second semester. Three hours credit. One 
class hour and two two-hour laboratory periods. A rep- 
etition of Home Economics 24A. 

Home Economics 27 — Millinery. 

Two hours, first semester. One hour credit. Two one- 
hour laboratory periods. Required of Home Economics 
majors. This course aims to teach practical millinery. 
Prerequisites: Home Economics 23 and Art 1. 



70 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Home Economics 28 — Millinery. 

Two hours, second semester. One hour credit. Two 
one-hour laboratory periods. A continuation of Home 
Economics 27. 

*Home Economics 29 — Home Planning. 

Three hours, first semester. Two hours credit. One 
class period and one two-hour laboratory period. Re- 
quired of Home Economics majors. This course aims 
to establish sound principles for home making. A study 
of the evolution of the home; modern houses; location, 
construction, drainage, ventilation, lighting, heating and 
water supply from a scientific, sanitary, economic and 
artistic standpoint. Prerequisites: Home Economics 23 
and Art 1. 

Home Economics 30 — Home Furnishing. 

Three hours, second semester. Two hours credit. One 
class period and one two-hour laboratory period. This 
course is devoted to a study of simple interiors; of pe- 
riod and modern furniture; of the choice and arrange- 
ment of furnishings for the home. Prerequisite: Home 
Economics 29. 

*Home Economics 32 — Methods of Teaching Home 
Economics. 

Three hours, first semester. Required of Home Econ- 
omics majors. Half of the time is devoted to Domestic 
Science and half to Domestic Art. Prerequisites: All 
required Home Economics courses and Education 20 
or 22. 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 71 

*Home Economics 33 — Practice Teaching in Home 
Economics. 

Four hours, second semester. Half of the teaching will 
be in Domestic Science and half in Domestic Art. Re- 
quired of Home Economics majors. Prerequisite: Home 
Economics 32. 



72 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



§ 














m 














s 




o 




o 






C>4 




8 

a 

o 




3 

a 

o 




















a 




a 










o 




o 








d 


o 










in 


w 


W 




H 






U) 


01 


a> 




a> 








So 


a 




1 








o 


o 


d 


o" 


d 




§ 


W 


m 


H 


W 


H 




0) 








<u 




T " 


S"5 




Sg2 


is 


as 






H 


■M 


w 


w 


w 




o 














o 










































u» 














o 














o 




























o 




























o> 






o 
o 




m 
5 

1 




















a 




a 










o 




o 










S3 


e 


o 




in 






W 


w 


H 




^7 






« 


0) 


V 




00 






a 




a 
i3 
















a 














1 


^ 












3 


S 














E 












§ 
s 


s 














CO 


1 


-a 


1 


a 


& 


3 

o 

S 

1 




1 


8 


i 


3 





FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



73 

























C^l 




c^ 






s 




GO 
















1 




1 












a 




S 




u 


o 




8 




H 


W 




H 




<u 


a> 




n> 




a^ 


a 




a 




o^ 


o 




5 




w 


n 




w 




e> 


t> 




t> 


o 


H 


w 


w 


H 


m 


<u 




o 


cu 


<D 


S$P 


go 


3-" 


a<o 


a*- 1 


0« 


S<M 


0« 


S<M 


geo 


w 


a 


H 


w 


w 






(M 




<M 






CO 




IS 






u 




o 






a 




1 
















a 






o 


» 


8 






m 


w 


w 






V 


<u 








a 


Sec 


a 






o 


o^ 


o 






W 


H 


w 






>> 






>> 


>> 


•§ 


& 




e3 

§ 


1 


1 
1 


1 
J 





74 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



§ 












V 


















« 










3 


w 


«*! 




7. 






oj<j 


-* 




eo 




c<« 


a^ 


<N 








3 




s 
'9 






o 


§ 




| 

o 




o 


W 


w 




W 






2 


V 


m 


o 


<M 


CM 


Sg3 


a 


<M 


s 


<M 








8 


1 


1 
















« 




O 








o 




o 






u 


« 




o 


« 




w 


W 




w 




as 


a> 




0) 






as 


a 


<M 


a 






3<M 


3 


s 

1 


o 






M 


w 


w 




















o 






t> 


o 








g 


w 






09 






a« 


a<M 




a 


S M 






Seo 




o 






w 


w 




w 


w 


§ 




































IO 












o 












a 






























C3 


o 




o 






w 


w 


w 


77 






03 


2 


a> 


en 


eo 


eo 


a 


a 


8fc 




'1 


! 




Sec 


r 












rt 


a 










o 


o 










u 










in 


W 


W 








77 


V 


22 








CO 


1 


a 
tl 








• 












5 






>> 






8 

i 


-1 


1 


i 


>> 

13 


& 


V) 


c 


S 


13 


i 


n3 


£ 


1 


£ 


I 


£ 


(5 


iZ 













FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



75 















PQ 

8 

I 
§ 

o 
W 

I 


C5 

as 


89 
g 

1 

d 

o 

I 

a 




h 


(M 

s 

I 

c 
o 

Q 
I 

w 


CM 

§ 

1 

O 

H 

I 




a" 


© 

m 

1 

O 

o 
o 

I 






























3 

1 

e 
© 

I 

a 


s 

§ 

s 


C9 

goo 

a 




H 
goo 

§CM 

a 








* 

1 

1 


1 


1 

c 

1 


>> 

CO 

P 

H 





76 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

MATHEMATICS 

Mr. McCarty Mr. Mercer 

Mathematics IS and Sp. — Teachers' Arithmetic. 

Five hours a week, spring term; four hours a week, 
summer term. Two hours credit. Hours to be ar- 
ranged. For those teaching Arithmetic in the elemen- 
tary schools. The course includes a study of the prin- 
ciples, processes, and history of arithmetic, and much 
drill in the solution of problems. All of the important 
topics of Arithmetic are considered from the viewpoint 
of the teacher. — Mr. McCarty. 

Mathematics 2 — Algebra. 

Three hours, first semester. Two hours credit. 1:00, 
M, W, F. For those offering only one unit of algebra 
for entrance. A rigid review of elementary algebra, 
and in addition, the general methods of factoring, rad- 
icals, quadratics, graphs, progression, and the binomial 
theorem. — Mr. Mercer. 

Mathematics 3 — Plane Geometry. 

Three hours, first semester. 9:10, M, W, F. Open to 
first year students, not offering plane geometry for en- 
trance. The usual theorems are supplemented with 
numerous exercises and original construction problems. 
— Mr. McCarty. 

Mathematics 4 — Plane Geometry. 

Three hours, second semester. 9:10, M, T, F. A con- 
tinuation of Mathematics 3. — Mr. McCarty. 

Mathematics 5 — Solid Geometry. 

Four hours, second semester. 10:05, M, T, W, F. Open 
to first and second year students not offering this sub- 
ject for entrance. This course includes theorems on 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 77 

lines, planes, and solids. Emphasis is placed upon 
original exercises and constructions, and the nature of 
mathematical proof. — Mr. Mercer. 

Mathematics 20 — Trigonometry. 

Four hours, first semester. 10 :05, M, T, W, F. The de- 
velopment and use of trigonometric functions, relations 
between junctions, logarithms, and solution of triangles. 
Applications of the functions and formulas are made 
by the use of many practical problems. Prerequisites: 
Mathematics 2, 3 and 4. — Mr. Mercer. 

Mathematics 21 — College Algebra. 

Four hours, first semester. 8 :15, T, W, Th, F. A study 
of the general quadratic and simultaneous quadratic 
equations, progression, variation, logarithms, mathe- 
matical induction, functions, theory of equations, per- 
mutations, combinations and determinants. Prerequi- 
site: Mathematics 2. — Mr. McCarty. 

Mathematics 22 — Analytic Geometry. (Omitted 1924-25.) 

Four hours, first semester. A brief practical treat- 
ment of the system of coordinates, geometric magni- 
tudes, loci, and their equations. The straight line, cir- 
cle, parabola, ellipse and hyperbola. Exercises illus- 
trating the analytic method are stressed throughout the 
course. Prerequisites: Mathematics 20 and 21. 

Mathematics 23 — Calculus. 

Four hours, second semester. 8:15, T, W, Th, F. The 
fundamental principles and idea of calculus and its ap- 
plication to the sciences and other mathematics. A 
brief treatment of limits, differentiation, summation, 
algebraic, trigonometric, and logarithmic functions, se- 
ries and integration. Prerequisites: Mathematics 7 
and 8. — Mr. McCarty. 



78 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Mathematics 24 — Teaching of Secondary Mathematics. 

(Omitted 1924-25.) 

Three hours, first semester. Prerequisite, twelve hours 
of college mathematics. This course is designed to 
meet the needs of teachers of mathematics in the junior 
and senior high schools. An examination of mathemat- 
ics as found in the present day courses of study. Aims 
of mathematical instruction; selection, and organization 
of subject matter and the approved methods of teaching. 
Prerequisites: Twelve hours of College Mathematics. 

Mathematics 25 — History of Mathematics. 

Two hours, second semester. 9:10, T, Th. To give 
teachers and students of mathematics a knowledge and 
appreciation of the historical development of the high 
school subjects: arithmetic, algebra, geometry and trig- 
onometry. Some attention is also given to the devel- 
opment of method. Prerequisites: Twelve hours of 
College Mathematics. — Mr. McCarty. 

FRENCH 

Miss Ice 

French 1 — Beginners' Course. 

Four hours, first semester. 8:15, T, W, Th, F. Ele- 
ments of grammar; pronunciation; phonetics; regular 
and common irregular verbs; simple vocabulary; read- 
ing of easy prose ; oral and written composition. Fraser 
and Squair's New French Grammar. 

French 2 — Beginners' Course. 

Four hours, second semester. 8:15, T, W, Th, F. Con- 
tinuation and completion of elementary grammar; read- 
ing of selections of prose and poetry; oral and written 
composition; dictation; emphasis on careful pronuncia- 
tion. 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 79 

French 20 — Modern Prose and Plays. 

Four hours, first semester. 11:00, M, T, Th, F. Read- 
ing of short stories, easy drama and novels; systematic 
gaining of a serviceable reading vocabulary for litera- 
ture; review of grammar with special study of the ir- 
regular verbs; practice in speaking and writing. 

French 21 — Modern Prose and Plays. 

Four hours, second semester. 11:00, M, T, Th, F. Con- 
tinuation of French 20. 

French 22 — Introduction to French Literature. 

(Omitted 1924-25.) 

Three hours, first semester. Study of representative 
authors of various periods; expressive reading and im- 
parting of literary appreciation. 

French 23 — Introduction to French Literature. 

(Omitted 1924-25.) 

Three hours, second semester. Continuation of French 
22. 

French 24 — Advanced Composition. (Omitted 1924-25.) 

One hour, first semester. Must be taken with French 
22 or preceded by it. 

French 25 — Advanced Composition. (Omitted 1924-25.) 
One hour, second semester. Continuation of French 24. 

FINE ARTS 

Music, Miss Osborn Art, Miss Briggs 

MUSIC 

Music 1A — Elementary Music. 

Four hours, first semester. Two hours' credit. 1:55, 
M, T, W, F. This course consists of musical theory, 



80 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

appreciation of music, and the work required by the 
syllabus for the first and second years of school, diction, 
rote songs, and sight singing. 

Music IB — Elementary Music. 

Four hours, second semester. Two hours credit. 1:55, 
M, T, W, F. A repetition of Music 1A. 

Music 2 A — Music Methods. 

Four hours, first semester. Two hours credit. 2:50, 
M, T, W, Th. This course is devoted to the teaching 
and demonstration of material and methods for the first 
three years in music. Special attention is given to the 
presentation of the different tonal and rythmic prob- 
lems, as they are taken up in successive years. Prere- 
quisite: Music 1, or its equivalent. 

Music 2B — Music Methods. 

Four hours, second semester. Two hours credit. 10:05, 
M, T, W, F. A repetition of Music 1A. 

Music 3A— Glee Club. 

Two hours, first semester. One hour's credit. 3:45, M, 
W. This course consists of voice and chorus training. 
Cantatas and choruses suitable for high and normal 
schools and for choirs, choral societies will be studied 
and sung at public concerts. 

Music 3B— Glee Club. 

Two hours, second semester. One hour credit. 3:45, 
M, W. A repetition of Music 2A. 

Music 4A — Music Methods. 

Four hours, first semester. Two hours' credit. 9:10, 
M, T, Th, F. Required of Standard Normal students 
who are enrolled in the intermediate curriculum. This 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 81 

course is devoted to the teaching and supervision of 
music in the grades from the fourth to the sixth. The 
work of each year is taken up in detail and problems 
which confront the grade teacher are carefully con- 
sidered. Prerequisite: Music 1, or its equivalent. 

Music 4B — Music Methods. 

Four hours, second semester. Two hours' credit. 9:10, 
M, T, Th, F. A repetition of Music 3A. 

Music 20 — Music Appreciation and History of Music. 

Four hours, first semester. 1:00, M, T, W, Th. This 
course is designed to cover the teaching of music appre- 
ciation in the elementary and in high schools. It will 
suggest and exemplify a practical course of study be- 
ginning with the first year of the elementary school 
and Extending through the high school. 

Music 21 — Sight Reading. 

Four hours, first semester. Two hours' credit. 10:05, 
M, T, W, F. This course includes singing at sight in- 
dividually, with words and with Latin syllables, music 
suitable for the first eight years in the public schools. 
An important requirement of this course is the ability 
to sing a phrase from memory after one glance at the 
representation. 

Music 22 — Harmony. 

Four hours, second semester. Four hours' credit. 1:00, 
M, T, W, Th. Admission to this course requires a work- 
ing knowledge of the rudiments of music. Chord re- 
lationship. Relation of harmony to rhythm and metric 
accents. Form as a factor in the selection of harmonies 
and their inversions. Application of these principles in 
the harmonization of melodies. Employment of non- 
chordal tones. Analysis. Discriminative hearing is an 
essential. 



82 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Music 23 A — Class Lessons in Voice. 

Two hours, first semester. One hour credit. 3:45, T, 
Th. Individual and class instruction and demonstra- 
tion. The foundation of singing, breath control; phras- 
ing; accent, rythm and enunciation. Good tone quality. 

Music 23B — Class Lessons in Voice. 

Two hours, second semester. One hour credit. 3:45, 
T, Th. A repetition of Music 23A. 

ART 

Art 1 — Elementary Drawing and Painting. 

Four hours, first semester. Two hours' credit. First 
section, 10:05, M, T, W, F; second section, 1:00, M, T, 
Th, F. Required of Standard Normal students enrolled 
for the primary or intermediate curriculum, who have 
not had elementary drawing in high school. The course 
includes the study of the landscape, plant and animal 
forms in both pictorial and decorative compositions. 

Art 3 — Primary Construction. 

Two hours, first semester. One hour credit. 1:55, M, 
W. All kinds of handwork suitable for the first four 
grades are planned in this course. Exercises in weav- 
ing, folding and cutting with various mediums. 

Art 4 — Advanced Construction. 

Two hours, first semester. One hour credit. 1:55, T, 
Th. Construction problems suitable for the upper 
grades are planned in this course, as portfolios, kodak 
books, blotter pads, boxes, lanterns, candle shades, table 
runners, etc. 

Art 5 — Drawing Methods. 

Four hours, second semester. Two hours' credit. First 
section, 9:15, M, T, Th, F; second section, 1:00, M, T, 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 83 

Th, F. Required of Standard Normal students who 
are enrolled in the primary or intermediate curriculum. 
It is the aim in this course to study the different sys- 
tems of public school art and to make an illustrated 
note book outlining the work for the eight grades. 
This should follow the course in elementary drawing. 

Art 20 — Art Appreciation. 

Three hours, first semester. 9:15, M, W, F. This 
course includes a series of talks on architecture, paint- 
ing and sculpture with the aim of awakening under- 
standing and enjoyment. 

Art 21— Perspective. 

Two hours, first semester. 9:15, T, Th. This course 
included the study of the common forms about us and 
the principles governing the expression of these objects 
as found in cylindrical and rectangular prospective, me- 
diums used; pencil charcoal, crayon and pencil. 

Art 22— Design. 

Four hours, second semester. 11:00, M, T, Th, F. 

Two hours' credit. This course includes the study of 

the principles of design. Original designs applied in 
leather, metal, block printing and stenciling. 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Mr. Hamill Miss Toivenen 

Before being assigned to physical education, a student 
is given a medical and physical examination. Those who 
are not able to take the courses are given special attention. 

The student must provide himself with gym suit and 
shoes. 

Members of the various athletic squads may, upon rec- 
ommendation of Mr. Hamill or Miss Tiovenen, be per- 
mitted to substitute this athletic training for any regular 
course in Physical Education except Physical Education 
3 or 4. 



84 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Physical Education 1 — Physiology and Hygiene. 

Three hours, first semester. First section (Miss Toiv- 
enen) 9:15, M, T, F; second section (Miss Toivenen) 
10:05, M, T, F; third section (Mr. Hamill) 10:05, M, 
T, W. Required in all courses. The facts and princi- 
ples of Anatomy and Physiology are taught in so far 
as they furnish some basis and reason for the more 
practical rules of hygiene. The nature and cause of 
common diseases are discussed together with means of 
prevention. There will be numerous class room dem- 
onstrations and some laboratory work. — Miss ToiVENEN 
and Mr. Hamill. 

COURSES FOR WOMEN 

Physical Education 2 — Elementary Physical Education. 

Four hours, first semester. Two hours' credit. 3:45, 
M, T, W, Th. Consists of setting up exercises for pos- 
ture training, including relays and simple games. 

Physical Eductaion 3 — Teachers' Primary Physical 
Education. 

Four hours, second semester. Two hours' credit. 11:00, 
M, T, Th, F. Required of all Standard Normal Seniors 
specializing in primary work. Consists of methods of 
teaching story plays, rhythm work, and games. 

Physical Education 4 — Teachers' Upper Grade Physical 
Education. 

Four hours, second semester. Two hours' credit. 8:15, 
T, W, Th, F. Required of Standard Normal seniors 
specializing in upper grade work. Consists of methods 
of teaching physical education and coaching more high- 
ly organized games. 

Physical Education 6 — Games. 

Four hours, first semester. Two hours' credit. 2:50, 
M, T, W, Th. Consists of teaching and training in 
basketball, volley ball, indoor baseball, and tennis. 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 85 

Physical Education 8 — Tennis. 

Four hours, fall, spring, and summer. One hour credit. 
Hours arranged. 

Physical Education 20 — Aesthetic Dancing. 

Four hours, first semester. Two hours' credit. 11:00, 
M, T, Th, F. For beginners. 

Physical Education 21 — Advanced Aesthetic Dancing. 

Four hours, second semester. Two hours' credit. 
11:00, M, T, Th, F. 

Physical Education 22 — Folk Dancing. 

Four hours, second semester. 9:15, M, T, Th, F. Two 
hours' credit. 

Physical Education 23 — Community Recreations. 

Four hours, first semester. Two hours' credit. 1:00, 
M, T, W, Th. A course for organizers of community 
recreation. Study of types of recreation suitable for 
home, church, school and larger community groups. 

Physical Education 24 — Corrective Work. 

Four hours, second semester. Two hours' credit. 1:00, 
M, T, W, Th. Required on A. B. course. A study of 
the application of exercise to different physical defects, 
such as drooping head, round shoulders, flat feet, etc. 

COURSES FOR MEN 

Physical Education 5 — Gymnasium. 

Four hours, first semester. Two hours' credit. 10:05, 
M, T, W, F. Setting up exercises, applied gymnasium, 
jumping exercises, running, walking, marching, vault- 
ing; coordinating and corrective work. 



86 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Physical Education 7 — Gymnasium. 

Four hours, second semester. Two hours' credit. 10:05, 
M, T, W, F. Continuation of Physical Education 5, 
with more variety. 

Physical Education 25 — Group Games. 

Four hours, second semester. Two hours' credit. 3:45, 
M, T, W, Th. Teaching of games for more athletics, 
organization of teams for tennis, track, cross-country 
running, indoor track, wrestling, boxing. 

EXTENSION DEPARTMENT 

In addition to the three courses of study the Normal 
School supports an Extension Department. This has two 
principal purposes: To assist those who cannot enter 
school, especially teachers, to continue their studies out of 
school; and to help improve educational conditions 
throughout the northern part of West Virginia. A num- 
ber of different kinds of extension activities are carried 
on, among which are the following: 

1. Extension classes are organized among teachers and 
others who may be interested, and conducted by different 
members of the faculty. Permission is also granted 
groups of students at a distance from the Normal School 
to form classes with a local leader as instructor. Stu- 
dents doing this kind of work are regularly enrolled 
and given credit for the actual amount of work done. 

2. Persons who are unable to enroll at the school may 
take correspondence work. This work is in charge of 
different members of the faculty and students and teach- 
ers may take it with profit. 

3. Members of the faculty of the Normal School, as far 
as possible, will accept invitations to assist in educational 
meetings and district institutes, and they are also avail- 
able for commencement addresses. School superintend- 
ents and Boards of Education are requested to write our 
Extension Deparmtent when they need the services of our 
faculty. 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 87 

4. Lecture Courses and entertainments are provided 
by the institution for the towns and school districts within 
its territory. These consist of lectures by members of the 
faculty, story-telling hours, readings, and musical pro- 
grams. Plans have also been made to organize and direct 
play festivals. 

5. The school will furnish judges for agricultural fairs 
and other similar exhibitions. 

6. Bulletins of educational interest are occasionally 
published. 

7. Information will be given on matters pertaining to 
the erection of school buildings, the purchasing of librar- 
ies, and the organization of schools. The Normal school, 
through its faculty, will be glad to serve the public schools 
in an advisory capacity. 

8. A Teachers' Employment Bureau is maintained for 
the purpose of securing positions for the graduates of the 
Normal school and for other teachers who may desire to 
enroll with the bureau. The institution finds that it can 
render a distinct service to teachers, superintendents and 
boards of education, through this bureau. All persons 
interested are requested to make use of it. 

9. Assistance is given in selecting suitable plays for 
high schools. 

The courses listed below will be given by correspondence 
during 1924-25. Tuition is at the rate of $2.50 per se- 
mester hour. 

Shreve — Ed. 6. Educational Psychology 4 hours 

Ed. 25. Educational Sociology 4 hours 

Hull — Ed. 3. Supervised Study 4 hours 

White — Ed. 6. School Management and School 

Hygiene 4 hours 

Opp — Eng. 3. Story Telling 2 hours 

Eng. 23. Recent Drama 2 hours 

Lewis — Eng. 8. Advanced Composition 3 hours 



88 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

Barnes — Eng. 21. Poetry 2 hours 

Eng. 47. Teaching of High School 
English 2 hours 

Morrow — Eng. 24S. American Literature from 

1870-1900 2 hours 

Eng. 34. Literary Study of the Bible 4 hours 
Eng. 35. New Testament..... 3 hours 

Stewart — Hist. A2. Roman History 4 hours 

Prichard — Hist. CI. Modern European History 4 hours 
Hist. E21. Economic and Social His- 
tory of the U. S 4 hours 

Ice — Soc. 2. Rural Sociology 4 hours 

Lively — Soc. 3. Introduction to General 

Sociology 4 hours 

Compton — Home Ec. 23. Practical Home Sewing 3 hours 

McCarty — Math. 2. Algebra 2 hours 

Math. 3. Plane Geometry 3 hours 

Math. 4. Plane Geometry 3 hours 

Math. 5. Solid Geometry fc 4 hours 

Rogers — Phys. Ed. 1. Physiology and Hygiene.. 3 hours 

The Extension Department publishes a brief circular 
descriptive of its work. Those interested should write for 
the circular. All communications should be addressed to 
M. E. McCarty, Head of the Extension Department. 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 89 



PRIVATE MUSIC INSTRUCTION 

Miss Belthoover, Piano and Organ 
Miss Osborn, Voice 

The school is equipped with four upright pianos, which 
are available for practice and a Knabe grand piano which 
is used for concert work. Private recitals are frequently 
given by the students, to which all members of the school 
will be admitted. Public recitals which are designed to 
give the students experience in public performance occur 
several times a year. 

Piano — The course of study in this department includes : 

I. Finger exercises; major and minor scales; scales in 
double thirds; arpeggios in all forms. 

II. Studies by Berens, Bertini, Heller, Hasert. 

III. Sonatinas by Kuhlau and Clementine; sonatas by 
Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven. 

IV. Compositions by representative composers of all 
periods. 

Pipe Organ — The organ course is intended to provide a 
thorough and complete preparation for the work of a 
church organist and accompanist. 

A certain facility at the piano and in sight-reading is 
necessary before this work is taken up. 

Special studies, pedal studies and hymn playing com- 
prise the preparatory work, followed by the works of 
Rink, Buck, Dunham, Chadwick, Bach, Mendelssohn, 
Guilmant, Rheingerger, and comprise the groundwork of 
study through the course. 

Tuition — The tuition for a semester, payable in ad- 
vance is: 

Lessons per week 

One Two 

Piano $25.00 $50.00 

Organ 27.00 54.00 

Harmony (class of three) 15.00 30.00 

Theory (class of three) ..... 15.00 30.00 

History of Music (class of 

three) 15.00 30.00 



90 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

VOCAL MUSIC 

Courses are offered in voice to students who have un- 
usual talent, or who wish to obtain correct ideas and 
habits concerning breathing, posture, voice placing, tone 
production, enunciation and articulation. Students will 
have opportunity to appear in concerts during the year. 

Tuition — The tuition for a semester, payable in ad- 
vance is: 

Lessons per week 
One Two 

Tuition $25.00 $50.00 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 91 



ENROLLMENT-1923-1924 



Post Grqduates 








1st 


2nd 


POST OFFICE COUNTY 


S. S. Sem. 


Sem. 



NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S. S. Sem. Sem. Sp 

Meredith, Kate Morgantown Monongalia * * 

Beddow, Herbert M . . . . Mannington Marion * 

Eartrick, George Monongah Marion * 






College Seniors 

Eliason, Ruth Virginia . Fairmont Marion 

Feather, Ruth Fairmont Marion 

Goode, Lula M Fairmont Marion * 

Heinzman, Elizabeth. . . .New Martinsville Wetzel * 

Howard. Cora Elizabeth . Hundred Wetzel * 

Leonard, Louise Fairmont Marion 

Duncan, Harlen Lester. .Shinnston Wetzel * 

Roberts, Lacy J Fairmont Marion 

College Juniors 

Altman, D. Loraine Fairmont Marion * 

Bartlett, Christine Shinnston Harrison * 

Akins, Elizabeth Fairmont Marion * 

Beebe, Leone Ridenour. Fairmont Marion 

Blatch'ord, Madeline B..Belington Barbour * 

Brand, Olive A Mannington Marion 

Charlton, Neva Mae .... Mannington Marion * 

Crawford, Anna Laurie . . Williamson Mingo * 

Crosfield, Anna Hunt . . .Berkeley Springs Morgan * 

Eib, Irene Eleanor Belington Barbour 

Fisher, Mrs. Rhea Grafton Taylor * 

Fleming. Marjorie Fairmont Marion 

Frame, Ella Ruth Gassaway Braxton * 

Freeland, Thelma Fairmont Marion 

Frum, Alice Lowe Shinnston Harrison 

Funk, Delia L Tunnelton Preston * 

Furbee, Naomi Mannington Marion 

Funt, Esther I Fairmont Marion 

Gaskin, Catherine H . . . . Monongah .... Marion 

Gibson, Mildred Sutton Braxton 

Goddin, Winnie S Elkins Randolph 

Giles, Dorothea A Fairmont Marion * 

Harper, Canaille Spencer Roane * 

Hess, Edythe M New Martinsville Wetzel * 

Hi.ks, Ernie Marie Summersville Nicholas * 



92 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



NAME 



POST OFFICE 



COUNTY 



1st 2nd 
S. S. Sem. Sem. Sp. 



Hill, Margaret Barnes. . .Fairmont Marion. . 

Huey, Dollie L Mannington Marion . . 

Jenkins, Beryl Genev. . .Fairmont Marion. . 

Johnston, Lillian Mannington Marion . . 

Johnson, Ruth .Fairmont Marion . . 

Jolliffe, Martha Ellen. . .Grafton Taylor. . . 

Keller, Inez Gertrude . . . Cameron Marshall . 

Mann, Mary Fairmont Marion . . 

Masters, Mabel Littleton Wetzel. . . 

Miller, Aldene Fairview Marion . . 

Musgrove, Winnie Davis.Fairmont Marion. . 

Neely, Olive Fay Fairmont Marion. . 

Oakes, Clarice Ruth. . . .Worthington Marion. . 

Park, Marjorie Farmington Marion. . . 

Pell, Laura B Fairmont Marion. . , 

Phillips, Helen C Mannington Marion . . . 

Potter, Iona F Fairmont Marion. . . 

Randall, Estelle Ebert . . Shinnston Harrison . . 

Reed, Hazel Mannington Marion . . . 

Reed, Mildred Arnett. . .Fairmont Marion. . . 

Reid, Mrs. R. S Fairmont Marion. . . 

Renner, Ella Virginia . . .Hundred Wetzel. . . 

Rex, Lucy M Broomfield Marion. . . 

Richmond. Edna Brad'y. Fairmont Marion. . 

Ridgeway, Jessie Barrackville Marion. . . 

Righter, Mary Elizabeth.Shinnston Harrison. . 

Robinson, Ersel Charlotte . Littleton Wetzel . . . 

Robinson, Virginia E Monongah Marion . . . 

Ross, Ella Christine Grafton Taylor 

Shinn, Virginia Belington Barbour. . . 

Stealey, Carline Fairmont Marion. . . 

Stewart, Bernice Enterprise Harrison. . 

Swisher, Sylvia Mae. . . .Monongah Marion. . . 

Talbot, Ruby Philippi Barbou. . . 

Thrasher, Thelma Alta. .Wilsonburg Harrison. . 

Turkovich, Mary Monongah Marion. . . 

Walls, Eupha M Fairmont Maiion. . . 

Wise, Nellie Margaret. . .Fairmont Marion. . . 

Yost, Mae Fairmont Marion . . . 



Amnions, John W. D . . . Fairview Marion . 

Carmichael, Harry Ed. .Fairmont Marion. 

Burke, Alexander. . .• Hundred Wetzel. . 

Cole, Dale Farmington Marion. 

Fleming, Harold D Farmington Marion. 

Davis, Glen Fairmont Marion. 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



1st 2nd 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S. S. Sem. Sem. Sp. 

Hess, Dowe S Cowen Webster * * 

Hunt, E. A Lumberport Harrison * 

Ridenour, Roscoe S Farmington Marion * 

Queen, H. M Grafton Taylor * 

Righter, Charles Lowe . . Shinnston Harrison * * 

Martin, Glenn Shinnston Harrison * 

Wallman, Lawrence A . . Fairmont Marion * * 

Wright, Bernard Fairmont Marion * 



College Sophomores 

Cather, Mrs. Elsie D. L. .Fairmont Marion. 

Cox, Pauline Shinnston Harrison. 

Harper, Elizabeth G Davis Tucker. . . 

LaFollette, Mary Fairmont Marion . . 

Mclntyre, Merritt Enterprise Harrison . 



Dingess, Leslie Cail Fairmont Marion. . . . 

Hall, Edward C Morgantown Monongalia. 

Hess, Dowe S Cowen Webster 

Joy, Frank D Muncie (Ind.) 

Martin, Herman C Fairmont Marion .... 

Mason, Cecil Wadestown Monongalia. 

Ross, Clarence Young. . .Fairmont Marion. . . . 

Ryan, John J Mannington Marion 

Smail, Carlyle Fairmont Marion 

Snodgrass, Dale Mannington Marion 

Squires, Fay C Fairmont Marion 

Thomas, Trevor R Westmoreland (Pa.) 



College Freshmen 

Barcus, Pauline FairmoDt Marion. 

Baldwin, Gladys Fairmont Marion. 

Boggess, Mary A Fairmont Marion. 

Bucy, Pauline C Fairmont Marion. 

Conaway, Mary Jo Fairmont Marion. 

Currey, Mildred L Fairmont Marion. 

Davis, Charlana Fairmont Marion. 

Funt, Martha Marian. . .Fairmont Marion. 

Gilespie, Eleanor Fairmont Marion. 

Hunsaker, Alma G Fairmont Marion. 

Irvin, Gypsy Virginia. . .Fairmont Marion. 

Koon, Mabel M Watson Marion. 

McDonald, Lucile Jane Lew Lewis. . . 

Pollock, Amelia E Fairmont Marion. 



94 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



NAME 



POST OFFICE 



COUNTY 



1st 2nd 
S. S. Sem. Sem. Sp. 



Potter, Ruth M Fairmont Marion. 

Reed, Ethel Virginia. . . .Watson Marion. 

Robey, Lelia Wiseman. .Baxter Marion. 

Rock, Sarah Fairmont Marion . 

Rosier, Mary Jo Fairmont Marion. 

Russo, Mary Louise. . . .Fairmont Marion. 

Smith, Madge Alden Grant Town Marion. 

Snider, Malissa Irene Fairmont Marion. 

Watson, Eleanor Fairmont Marion. 

Weaver, Mary C Fairview Marion. 

Wilson, Valda Fairmont Marion . 

Yost, Margaret Ann. . . .Fairmont Marion. 



Ammons, Ben 

Balderson, Walter Lloyd . 
Barbers, George Franklin . 

Barret, James 

Batteiger, Wayne 

Brett, Thomas, Jr 

Brock, Clarence A 

Brown, Wayman 

Craig, George L 

Del Sordo. Frank 

Elbin,PaulM 

Freeland, Harold L 

Funk, Hallis 

Garlow, Theo. Roosevelt 
Gilkinson, Wilfred H. . . 

Gillis, MaxP 

Hagerty, Charles 

Harden, Robert 

Hardy, Michael Charles, 

Hollisbery, Francis 

Criss, Albert 

Jefferys, Roy 

Leeper, Harry Thomas. 

Lashley, LynnC 

Mason, Wilber 

McCray, Edward Thos. 

Meredith, Marion 

Michael, Newton G 

Miller, Oliver J 

Moosy, George 

Mullennax, James 

Neely, Alfred 



Fairview Marion . . 

Fairmont Maiion . . 

Fairmont Marion . . 

Fairmont Marion . . 

Fairmont Marion . . . 

Fairmont Marion . . 

Fairmont Marion . . 

Lumberport Harrison. 

Fairmont Marion. . . 

Fairmont Marion . . . 

Cameron Marshall . . 

Fairmont Marion . . . 

Fairmont Marion . . . 

.Fairmont Marion . . . 

Fairmont Marion . . , 

Fairmont Marion. . 

Farmington Marion. . . 

Fairmont Marion . . . 

Sharon (Pa.) 

Elkins Randolph. 

Fairmont Marion . . . 

Belington Barbour. . . 

Fairmont Marion . . . 

Cumberland (Md.) 

Fairmont Marion. . . 

Fairmont Marion. . . 

Fairmont Marion. . . 

Fairview Marion. . . 

Fairmont Marion . . . 

Monongah Marion. . . 

Elkins Randolph. 

Fairmont Marion. . . 



* * 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 95 

1st 2nd 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S. S. Sem. Sem. Sp. 

Offner, Edward Fairmont Marion * 

Parks, Calrton L Fairmont Marion * * 

Patterson, Boyd Fairmont Marion * * 

Scalise, Gabriel Fairmont Marion * 

Showalter, Emmet M. Jr.. Fairmont Marion * * 

Tennant, Raymond Barrackville Marion * 

Whoolery, Kenneth Fairmont Marion * * 



Senior Normal 

Ackerson, Gertrude Sistersville Tyler * 

Adams, Margaret Virginia . Middlebourne Tyler * 

Ankron, Ila Betty Alma Tyler * 

Arnold, Nelle Weston Lewis * 

Atha, Eva Lenore Barrackville Marion 

Atkins, May Weston Lewis * 

Ball, Leta M Maggie Mason * 

Ballah, Beulah Belington Barbour * 

Bartlett, Corinne Barrackville Marion * 

Bartlett, Erma Hezel. . .Fairmont Marion 

Bennet, Mrs. Leo M. . . .Webster Springs Webster * 

Bice, Bertha Virginia . . . Bridgeport Harrison * 

Boatman, Leafy R Fairmont Marion 

Bolliver, Mary Kathleen . Shinnston Harrison 

Bogdonovich, Mary Davis Tucker 

Boyer, Thelma Fairmont Marion. 

Bracey, Elizabeth C . . . . Morgantown Monongalia * 

Brand, Lois Leone Broomfield Marion * 

Brandenburg, Mabel. . . .Belington Barbour * 

Brock, Mary Emily Fairview Marion 

Brown, Nelle Fairmont Marion 

Bruffey, Georgie Roanoke Lewis * 

Burge, Mabel Mae Parkersburg Wood 

Burns, Mary Virginia. . .Terra Alta Preston * 

Butcher, Ina Weston Lewis 

Carder, Orpah Sutton Braxton * 

Cassell, Anna Marie Gra'ton Taylor * 

Chalfant, Sarah Margaret. Fariview Marion 

Charlton, Edith Brown. .Mannington Marion * 

Cbilds, Margaret Ruth. .Fairmont Marion 

Clancy, Elizabeth Mannington Marion 

Clayton, Mabel Baxter Marion * 

Clelland, Martha Smith . Fairmont Marion * 

Cochran, Jessie Benton. .Gra'ton Taylor * 

Collins, Ruth Helen Fairmont Marion 

Combs, Bertha Wilson. .Fairmont Marion * 



96 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



1st 2nd 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S. S. Sem. Sem. Sp. 

Connelly, Elma Claire. .Fairmont Marion * * 

Conner, Mary McMechen Marshall * 

Cook, Nellie C Haywood Harrison * * 

Copenhaver, Coralie .... Wallace Marion * 

Core, Ella St. Marys Pleasants * 

Cougill, Leone Parker (Ind.) * 

Cowan, Ida M Fairview Marion * 

Coyner, Lois Ligon Clover Lick Pocahontas * 

Cross, Daisy B Fairmont Marion * * 

Cunningham, Hazel Hepzibah Harrison * 

Davis, Irene Fairmont Marion * * 

Dietz, Opal B Moundsville Marshall * 

Dragoo, Rilla Haught.. .Fairmont Marion * * 

Du f rene, Marie Irene. . .Wheeling Ohio * 

Dumire, Mrs. Lillian PoeElkins Randolph * * 

Dunnington, Ruth V Fairmont Marion * * 

Duvall, Janette Clarksburg Harrison * * 

Dye, Madge Hundred Wetzel * * 

Eib, Eugenia Lost Creek Harrison * 

Faust, Mrs. Carter L. . .Fairmont Marion * 

Fitzgerald, Katherine L . Mannington Marion * * 

Fitzhugh, Harriet K Fairmont Marion * * 

Flynn, Amie Marie Morgantown Monongalia * 

Frum, Iva Fairmont Marion * * * 

Ford, Euphama Frances Independence Taylor * 

Gall, Elsie M Philippi Barbour * 

Garner, Ruth Fairmont Marion * * 

Gibson, Ila Kathryn Gra'ton Taylor * 

Gillespy, G. Amanda Wheeling Ohio * 

Glenn, Helen L Fairmont Marion * * 

Goff, Golda Weston Lewis * 

Grimes, Eleanor B Ravenswood Jackson 

Grimm, Wilfred Shinnston Harrison * 

Haley, Orpha Hepzibah Harrison * 

Haas. Gladys Beatrice. .Fairmont Marion * * 

Hall, Eva Gertrude Fairmont Marion ... . * * * 

Hall, Fairy Jane Fairmont Marion * * * 

Hall .Fannye Katheryn. .Fairmont Marion * * 

Haught, Stella Fairview Marion * * 

Hawkins, Jessie M Rivesville Marion * * 

Hamilton, Clarice Ruth . Newburg Preston * 

Hamrick, Mary Martha. Wilsonburg Harrison * 

Hawkins, Lola Gay Fairmont Marion * 

Hayhurst, Jemima Evelyn. Fairmont Marion * 

Hefner, Freda Weston Lewis * 

Hecker, Norma Marian. .Fairmont Marion * 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 97 



1st 2nd 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S. S. Sem. Sem. Sp. 

Heckert, Osee Ireland. . . Spencer Roane * 

Hennen, Genevieve Metz Marion * 

Hennen, Margaret Lucille . Mannington Marion 

Hess, Rilla Farmington Marion * 

Hinebaugh, Thelma Kingmont Marion * * 

BQginbotham, Margaret A .Shinnston Harrison 

Hines, Genevieve Orndoff Webster 

Holt, Edith Cook Shinnston Harrison * 

Hornor, Catherine Mannington Marion * * 

Houck, Leona Fairmont Marion * 

Hughes, Mary Gay Shinnston Harrison * 

Hudkins, Lucille Lenore . Gassaway Braxton * 

Hunsaker, Mildred Eliz..Fairmont Marion * * 

Dor, Doris Hall Fairmont Marion * * 

Ioe, Mrs. Delcie M Sistersville Tyler * 

Ice, Lula Virginia Clarksburg Harrison * * 

Iden, Jocie Mary Davis Tucker * 

Ingram, Elizabeth B Fairview Marion * 

Isner, Mrs. Blair Fairmont Marion * 

Jackson, Neva Violet. . .Pbilippi Barbour * 

Janssen, Rose E Buckhannon Upshur * 

Jenkins, Lula M Terra Alta Preston * 

John, Olive Chester Hancock * 

Jones, Katherine Evert. .Fairmont Marion * * 

Judge, Belva Gorby. . . . .Pine Grove Wetzel * 

Judge, Lucy .Pine Grove Wetzel * 

Kelly, Eunice Grafton Taylor * * 

Kennedy, Eva Helen. . . .Hundred Wetzel * 

Kearns, Frances Delvera . Smithfield Wetzel * * 

Kessel, Zora D Ripley Jackson * 

Kimble, Gertride Win. . .Paden City Wetzel * 

Kendall, Freda Mannington Marion * * 

Knight, Rebecca Clarksburg Harrison * * 

Lane, Marie R Wheeling Ohio * 

LaZear, Irene Sistersville Tyler * * 

Leach, Emma Gra'ton Taylor * 

Lough, Irene Farmington Marion * * 

Lyons, Frances Fay Broomfield Marion * * 

Lunsford, Nelle Weston Lewis * * 

Mahan, Alice Shinnston Harrison * 

Manear, Velva Loraine . .Lumberport Harrison * * 

Martin, Genevieve W. . .Monongah Marion * * 

Marsh, Angela R Parkersburg Wood * 

Mathews, Ava Evelyn. .Fairmont Marion * 

MoKinley, Wanda Irene. Weston Lewis * * 

McKinney, Gertrude Fairmont Marion * * 



98 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



NAME 



POST OFFICE 



COUNTY 



1st 2nd 
5. S. Sem. Sem. Sp. 



MoCormick, Vera Editha . 
McMillan, Edna Glenola . 

MoPherson, Mary 

Michael, Euth Eleanor. . 

Morgan, Mattie R 

Morgan, NaomiFrances . 

Morris, Evelyn 

Musgrave, Sarah Florence 
Myers, Virginia Gray. . . 
Nuzum, Hazel Rozella . . 
Ocheltree, Katheryn 

O'Dea, Genevieve 

O'Dell, Elizabeth 

Owens, Pearl Marie 

Parrish, Doris 

Parrish, Edna 

Parrish, Margaret 

Parsons, Flora Jane 

Peek, Pearl 

Phillips, Lois Ireme 

Parrish, Helen Effie 

Pigott, Pearl Robinson. . 

Post, Reta 

Price, Emma Beulah 

Priest, Helen 

Posten, Muriel Nellie . . . 

Powell, Mary B 

Rector, Hazel Gay 

Reitz, Helen 

Redfox, Mildred B 

Reese, Madge 

Ridgway, Mildred 

Robinson, Margaret 

Rudy, Madeline Ault . . . 
Russell, Marie Louise . . . 

Rymer, Olive Craig 

Satterfield, Helen Virg . . 
Shaffer, Hazel Winifred. 

Shain, Ruth 

Sharps, Hazel 

Seaton, Mary Virginia . . 

Shough, Edna Lee 

Skiles, Ada Frances 

Slepesky, Mary Verna. . 
Shutts, Ethel Bartlett. . . 
Smith, Hallie 



Cameron Marshall * 

Masontown Preston * 

Burnsville Braxton 

Mannington Marion 

Fairmont Marion * 

Fairmont Marion 

Fairmont Marion 

.Wheeling Ohio * 

Clarksburg Harrison 

Fairmont Marion 

Weston Lewis * 

Littleton Wetzel * 

Fairmont Marion 

Middlebourne Tyler * 

Worthington Marion * 

Fairview Marion * 

Fairmont Marion * 

Ripley Jackson * 

Richwood Nicholas * 

Rivesville Marion 

Grafton Marion 

Lumberport Harrison * 

Buckhannon Upshur * 

Mannington Marion * 

Franklin Pendleton * 

Grafton Taylor 

Fairmont Marion 

Shinnston Harrison * 

Elkins Randolph * 

Clarksburg Harrison 

Fairmont Marion 

Barrackville Marion * 

Monongah Marion 

Rachel Marion 

Fairmont Marion * 

Mannington Marion 

Fairmont Marion 

Grafton Taylor 

Clarksburg Harrison 

Bretz Preston 

Fairmont Marion * 

Gundred Wetzel 

Sabreton Monongalia 

Watson Marion 

Masontown Preston * 

Gassaway. , Braxton • 






FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 90 



1st 2nd 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S. S. Sem. Sem. 

Snedegar, Delphia Agnes . Marlinton Pooahontas * * 

Snider, Mary Ruth Fairmont Marion * * 

Smith, Opal Freda Monongah Marion * 

Smith, Thelma M Nutter Fort Harrison * 

Snider, Irene Mannington Marion * 

Snodgrass, Gypsy J Smithfield Wetzel 

Snopps, Mary Elizabeth . Bull town Braxton * 

Spurgeon, Lula M Morgantown Monongalia 

Stalnaker, Camille Elkins Randolph * 

Stalnaker, Mrs. Mildred . Fairmont Marion * 

Stanley, Mary P Fairmont Marion * * 

Stanton, Alice Bernice. . Annore Harrison * * 

Starkey, Edna Violet Mannington Marion * 

Starkey, Bertha Smithfield Wetzel * * 

Stealey, Emma Louise. .Fairmont Marion * * 

Stephenson, Clarice Weston Lewis * 

Stephenson, Enid Weston Lewis * * 

Stephenson, Gladys Weston Lewis * 

Straight, Hezel Virginia-Grant Town Marion * * 

Core, Elsie Lee Masontown Preston 

Hartley, Goldie Fairmont Marion 

Summers, Ada Belington Barbour * 

Sutton, Mabel Irene .... Gassaway Braxton * 

Talbot, Ruby Philippi Barbour • 

Tennant, Nelle Virginia.. Barrackville Marion * 

Tennant, Sallie E Barrackville Marion * 

Tucker, Fay Canfield Braxton * 

Uhl, Mrs. Winona Williamstown Wood * 

Walls, Ruth A Hudson Preston * * 

Walls, Virginia Beatrice..Shinnston Harrison * * 

West, Goldie Marie Fairmont Marion * * 

Ward, Helen Mill Creek Randolph 

White, Julia Marlowe. . .Fairmont Marion * 

Whitlock, Elizabeth Durban Pocahontas * 

Wilmoth, Frances Elkins Randolph * 

Wilson, Olive Dunham. .Fairmont Marion * 

Wright, Edna Newburg Preston * 

Wyckoff, Zeppa F Fairmont Marion * 

Yeager, Nelle Howard . . Marlinton Pocahontas * 

Yoho, Flossie G Howard Marshall * 

Allender, Arthur N Grafton Taylor * 

Auvil, G. G Parsons Tucker * 

Atha, Lester G Farmington. Marion * * 

Baker, Royal Frank Gassaway Braxton * 

Cale, George Claude Terra Alta Preston * 

Cole, John W Hepzibah Harrison * 



100 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



1st 2nd 

NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S. S. Sem. Sem. 

Deakins, Guy A Rowlesburg Preston * * * 

Duncan, Harlen Mannington Marion * 

Goddin, Elmer D Elkins Randolph * 

Gumm, B. L Frametown Braxton * 

Hunt, Garret Burton Wetzel * 

Linger, Mandeville S Cairo Ritchie * 

Little, Charles Leon. . . .Bridgeport Harrison * 

Long, Claude Earl Parsons Tucker * * * 

Martin, Edgar Blair. . . .Shinnston Harrison * * 

McQuain, Adam Orlando Lewis * * 

Morton, Arnold R Camden Webster * 

Newlon, Roy Melvin Grafton Taylor * 

Parrish, Archel Mannington Marion * 

Pigott, Lynn Lumberport Harrison * 

O'Donnell, Eale B Parkersburg Wood 

Duffield, Vaughn Bernsville Braxton * 

Roberts, Odgar Hundred Wetzel * 

Robbins, James Minor . . Shinnston Harrison * 

Robinson, Fred D Grafton Taylor * 

Rogers, Fred S Independence Preston * 

Sharps, A. B Lumberport Harrison * 

Skinner, Minter P Gassaway Braxton * 

Snodgrass, John S Mannington Marion * 

Stiles, Donley L Wadestown Monongalia 

Scott, Raymont Smithfield Wetzel 

White, Simon L Hundred Monongalia 

Willis. Mitchell Elic Shinnston Harrison 



Standard Normal Juniors 

Alderson, Margaret Summersville Nicholas * 

Allman, Floy Coxes Mills Gilmer * 

Allen, Sadie Wallace Harrison * 

Ammons, Nelle Opal Mannington Marion * 

Anderson, Emily W Fairmont Marion 

Balderson, Estyl Genev..Fairmont Marion * 

Barnard, Rachael W. . . .Rowlesburg Preston * 

Barnes, Doris Virginia. .Fairmont Marion 

Beall, Mary Margaret. . .MaDnington Marion 

Beamus, Katherine Mannington Marion * 

Beck, Anna Sophia Weston Lewis 

Beecher, Genevieve M . .Jane Lew Lewis * 

Bennet, Beulah Grafton Taylor * 

Best, Hazel Irene Cameron Marshall * 

Bice, Mary Louise Gypsy Harrison 

Birkheimer, Iva Mae ... St. Marys Pleasants * 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 101 



1st 2nd 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S. S. Sem. Sem. Sp. 

Bowermaster, Mary E . .Bruceton Mills Preston * 

Bowers, Mrs. Pbillis G. .Elkins Randolph * 

Boor, Christine Farmington Marion * 

Boyers, Naomi Beatrice . Fairmont Marion * * 

Brand, Mary Louise Albright Preston * 

Bryant, Mary Gertrude . Fairmont Marion * * 

Butcher, Ina Weston Lewis * * 

Byard, Myrtle Four States Marion * 

Brumage, Ina Smithfield Wetzel * 

Calvert, Muriel Mannington Marion * 

Carmen, Mary Jane. . . .Hundred Wetzel * 

Campbell, Alberta Beryl. Mannington Marion * 

Cather, Orpah P Grafton Taylor * * 

Cbannell, Edna Fairmont Marion • 

Chapman, Myrtle Sutton Braxton * 

Cbrystal, Margueriete. .Davis Tucker * 

Colling, Murle Bruceton Mills Preston * 

Collins, Ava Gladys Fairmont Marion * 

Cooper, Mafalda Hudges . Clarksburg Harrison * 

Corbin, Ruth Germaine . Meadowbrook Harrison * * 

Dameron, Margaret P. .Jane Lew Lewis * * 

Davis.Hellen Katheryn. .Fairmont Marion * * 

Davis. Luella Mae Cameron Marshall * * 

Davis, Martha Jean. . . Hammond Marion * * 

Darby, Cora Maude Bruceton Mills Preston * 

DeMoss, Minnia Grafton Taylor * 

DeVoe, Anna Jane Fairmont Marion * * 

Deitz, Gertrude St. George Tucker * 

Dice, Bonnie Franklin Pendleton * 

Dragoo, Louise Smithfield Wetzel * 

Echols, Isrel Littleton Wetzel * 

Eib, Nellie Virginia Belington Barbour * * 

Faecett, Virginia V Grafton Taylor * * 

Fletcher, Virginia Fairmont Marion * * 

Frame, Mabel Irene Gassaway Braxton * * 

Forbes, Margaret L Morgantown Monongalia * 

Fultz, Lena G Clarksburg Harrison * 

Goff, Mildred Rose Cowen Webster * * 

Gregory, Hazel Clarksburg Harrison * 

Griffith, Margaret Farmington Marion * * 

Groves, Dora Mae Graiton Taylor * 

Hale, Virgean Lenore. . .Fairmont Marion * 

Haley, Rose L Bridgeport Harrison * 

Hamilton, Freda Hundred Wetzel * * 

Harbert, Lola Pauline. . .Dola Harrison * 

Hartlieb, Josephine Mannington Marion * * 



102 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



1st 2nd 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S. S. Sem. Sem. 

Hawkins, Virginia A. . . .Fairmont Marion * 

Heckert, Constance Spencer Roane * 

Heinzman, Blanche New Martinsville Wetzel * * 

Henderson, Mildred. . . .Grafton Taylor 

Hess, Pearl Floyd Mannington Marion * * 

Hill, Bettie Louise Fairmont Marion * * 

Himelrick, Essie Burton Wetzel * 

Himelrick, Josephine Burton Wetzel * 

Holland, Bernice Mannington Marion * * 

Hood, Roby Jannette. . . Barrackville Marion * 

Huey, Thelma Jean Mannington Marion * * 

Hughes, Hilda Ernestine. Shinnston Harrison * 

Hughes, Mary Madeline . Fairmont Marion * * 

Johnson, Audrie Clarksburg Harrison * 

Johnson, Gail Virginia. .Blacksville Monongalia * 

Johnson, Olive Frances. .Clarksburg Harrison * * 

Jenkins, Mary Naomi. . .Clarksburg Harrison 

Jones, Winifred Naomi. .Fairmont Marion * * 

Kearns, Mary E Rowlesburg Preston * 

Keifer, Maxine Lucille. .Paden City Wetzel * 

Kimble, Gladys Fae.... Littleton Wetzel * * 

Kittle, Mildred Marg. . .Belington Barbour * 

Knarr, Edith N Coalwood McDowell * 

Knight, Margaret Brady. Fairmont Marion 

Lemley, Bessie Blacksville Monongalia * 

MacNary, Mildred Clarksburg Harrison * 

Mayne, Alma Idella. . . .Enterprise Harrison * * * 

Malotte, Virginia Fairmont Marion * 

Mayyou, Mildred Lucille . Tunnelton Preston * 

McCauley, Margaret Fairmont Marion * 

McElroy, Myrtle R Fairmont Marion * 

McKain, Margaret Monongah Marion * 

McKinney, Isabell F Fairmont Marion * 

McKinley, Virginia Clarksburg Harrison * 

Durr, Anna Mary Tunnelton Preston * 

Meredith, Hazel Louise. .Shinnston Harrison * * 

Metz, Gladys Marguerite . Mannington Marion * 

Miller, Lutie V Littleton Wetzel * ..l I * 

Monroe, Janice Clarksburg Harrison * .;£ j, * 

Montgomery, Inez L Broomfield Marion * 

Moore, Dorothy Fairmont Marion * 

Moore, Josephine L Mannington Marion * 

Morgan, Myrtle Fairmont Marion * 

Morris, Ruby Glover Gap Marion * 

Morris, Beatrice B Shinnston Harrison * 

Morgan, Ruth Frances. .Fairmont Marion * 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 103 



1st 2nd 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S. S. Sem. Sem. Sp. 

Noland, Eira Enid. Davis Tucker * 

Oaks, Clarice Ruth Worthington Harrison * 

Owen, Anna Y Littleton Wetzel * * 

Peterson, Gertrude Weston Lewis * 

Phillips, Inez Estella Cameron Marshall * 

Poling, Bertha Fairmont Marion * 

Quinet, Yvonne Morgantown Monongalia * 

Ralphsnyder, Lillian Iris. Morgantown Monongalia * 

Rannenberg, Hazel Marie. Fairmont Marion * 

Reeder, Anna Lillian Folsom Wetzel * * 

Rich, Sarah Elizabeth. . .Fairmont Marion * * 

Reed, Helen L Washington (D. C.) * 

Ridenour, Elizabeth. . . .Terra Alta Preston * 

Riggs, Sylvia Dale Grant Town Marion * * 

Robey, Marie Broomfield Marion * 

Robinson, Mary Clarksburg Harrison * 

Robinson, Vella Genev. .Fairmont Marion * 

Robinson, Mrs. E. E Fairmont Marion * 

Rogers, Freda Gertrude..Grafton Taylor * 

Rogers, Lena Margaret. .Fairmont Marion * 

Rose, Ethel Heaters Braxton * * 

Rothlisberger, Virginia L . Fairmont Marion * * * 

Rudy, Mildred Downs Marion * * 

Rule, Lottie Marie Wyatt Harrison * * * 

Rushford, Charlotte . . . .New Martinsville Wetzel * * 

Satterfield, Martha Fairmont Marion * * 

Satterfield, Veda Harrisville Ritchie * 

Saunders, Harriet V . . . .Enterprise Harrison * 

Scranage Pearl Beatrice . Graiton Taylor * *' 

Josephine Fairmont Marion * * 

in, Adas Newburg Preston * 

Shafer, Mary Margaret. Grafton Taylor * 

Shaver, Charlotte Muriel . Monongah Marion * * 

Shepherd, Bessie Belington .Barbour * 

Simpson. Grace Fairmont Marion * 

Slepeskey, Anna Jo Watson Marion * * 

Smith Nelle Waverly Wood * 

Smith, Pearl Fairmont Marion * * 

Smith, Zoe E Fairmont .Marion * * 

Snider, Lillian E Hundred Wetzel * 

Spitznogle, Margaret .... Hundred Wetzel * 

Sprigg, Georgia Sutton Braxton * 

Stealey, Josephine E Mannington Marion * * * 

Stewart, Myrtle Benns Run Pleasants * 

Sullivan, Ethel Constance . St. Marys Pleasants * 

Sybert, Helen Miller Mannington Marion * * 



104 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



1st 2nd 

NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S. S. Sem. Sem. Sp. 

Bunner, Mrs. E. E Grafton Taylor * 

Sturm, Ella Shinnston Harrison * * 

Tucker, Mary Frances . . Morgantown Monongalia * * 

Taylor, Reland Fairmont Marion * * 

Webner, Mary Louise. . .Glover Gay Marion * * 

West, Pbillis Roanoke Lewis * 

Williams, Mary Ernestine. Fairmont Marion * 

Willis, Olaf Shinnston Harrison * * 

Wilson, Valda Belle Fairmont Marion * * 

Wilson Virginia Grafton Taylor * 

Wolfe Ruth R Bruceton Mills Preston * 

Wooddell Leola Cath . . . Morgantown Monongalia * * 

Wood, Leah Littleton Wetzel * * 

Zeller, Margaret Terra Alta Preston * 

Zirkle, Winona Garnet . .Brown Harrison * 

Armstrong, Bryan Independence Taylor * * 

Beale, 0. Bryan Mingo Pocahontas * * * 

Bolyard, 0. G Grafton Taylor * 

Colvis, Walter Black 

Cubbon, Claude Hastings . Lumberport Harrison * * 

Everly, Ralph Benton (Ohio) * 

Fike, Albert Paul Bruceton Mills Preston * 

Fleming, Joseph H St. Marys Pleasants * 

Floyd, Ralph Mannington Marion * 

Hanes, B. E Mannington Marion * 

Johnston, Dale Shinnston Harrison * 

Knisely, Alfred T Fairview Marion * 

Martin, Orvil Cloves French Creek Upshur * * 

Michael, George Paul. . .Fairview Marion * * 

Miller, Byron Fairview Marion * * 

Moore, Mahlon Fairview Marion * 

Parrish, Lee Mannington Marion * 

Reeder, Jack Harry Folsom Wetzel * 

Robinson, Kenneth Griffin. Shinnston Harrison * * 

Rush, Lawrence Mannington Marion * 

Rush, William Evert Earnshaw Wetzel * 

Ryan, Alpha Ray Bruceton Mills Preston * 

Schooley, Hobert Moatsville Preston * 

Scott, Charles M Smithfield Wetzel * 

Seese, W. Carl Shinnston Harrison * 

Shanks, Hillis Gradon. . .Core Monongalia * 

Stewart, Robert Frank. .Clarksburg Harrison * 

Tennant, Byron Ross. . .Rivesville Marion * 

Thomas' CbarleeArthur. Bruceton Mills Preston * 

Thomas, Howard Ed Bruceton Mills Preston * 

Wood, Walter A Grafton Taylor * 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 105 



NAME 



POST OFFICE COUNTY 

Short Normal Course 



1st 



2nd 



Allen, Luenia Hundred Wetzel 

Anderson, Beulah Wyatt Harrison . . . 

Atkinson Frances White Sulphur Spgs. .Greenbrier. . 

Baker, Martha Rivesville Marion 

Ballman, Nerissa Eliz. . .Mannington Marion. . . . 

Barnes Blanche Meadowbrook Harrison. . . 

Barr, Naomi Lee Mannington Marion .... 

Bennett, Ocle Monongah Marion 

Berger, Carrie Clarksburg Harrison. . . 

Berry, Muriel Evelyn. . .Fairmont Marion 

Beall, Mary Margaret. . .Mannington Marion. . . . 

Blair, Rosalie D Keyser Mineral. . . . 

Bock, Bessie L Farmington Marion. . . . 

Boor, Lelia Carol Grant Town Marion. . . . 

Boyers, Naomi Beatrice . Fairmont Marion .... 

Brandenburg, Marie Belington Barbour 

Briggs Delia Terra Alta Preston 

Brand, Sybil Rachael Marion 

Brock, Dorothy Fairview Marion. 

Brock, Virginia Fairview Marion. . . . 

Brown, Elsie Virginia. . .Smithfield Wetzel 

Brown, Mary Sutton Braxton , 

Casteel, Ida Bayard Grant 

Carlin, Mary Alma Folsom Wetzel 

Carr, Dorris Fairmont Marion 

Cather, Margaret J Grafton Taylor 

Burnside, Celia Elizabeth . Clarksburg Harrison . . . 

Cheshire, Florence Keyser Mineral 

Clayton, Mabel Baxter Marion 

Clelland, Willa Irene — Fairmont Marion .... 

Cornwell, Edna Moatsville Barbour 

Creamer, Freno Loraine . Lumberport Harrison . . . 

Crimm, Pearl Wyatt Harrison . . . 

Clovis, Mrs. Walter Pentress Monongalia. 

Criss, Inez Farmington Marion 

Cullinan, Kathleen Dean Wetzel 

Davis, Hattie Hammond Marion 

Deahl, Lelah D Hazelton Preston 

Deberry, Mary B Terra Alta Preston 

Dodd, Dorothy Fairview Marion .... 

Drummond, Neva Reeves . Adamston Harrison . . . 

Drummond, Pearl Hepzibah Harrison 

Dumire, Laura Atherton.Horton Randolph. . . 

Dunn, Etta Alaska Mineral 



106 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



1st 2nd 

NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S. S. Sem. Sem. Sp. 

Athey, Mildred Geraldine . Parkersburg Wood * 

Edwards, Irene Barger. .Shinnston Harrison * 

Edwards, Mary Kathleen. Belington Barbour * 

Eminger, Edna Lillian. .Rivesville Marion * * 

Fisher, Anne Cowan Webster * 

Ford, Alma Independence Taylor * 

Fordyce, Hazel Fairview Marion * 

Fortney, Braxie Radford . Shinnston Harrison * 

Frances, Beryl Rowlesburg Preston * 

Fromhart, Mary Newburg Preston * 

Funk, Inez Virginia Tunnleton Preston * 

Gall, Ginevra Moatsville Barbour * 

Gainer, Wanda Belington Barbour * 

Gibson, Beatrice Flatwoods Braxton * 

Gilleland, Alice Fairview Marion * 

Gilleland, Martha Louise . Fairview Marion * 

Glover, Nancy Ann Glover Gap Marion * 

Goldsborough, Marg. G . Romney Hampshire * 

Goodnight, Edna Burton Wetzel * 

Grapes, Eva Marie Hepzibah Harrison * 

Gumm, Edna Louise Frametown Braxton * * 

Franklin, Alice E Mannington Marion * * 

Hall, Oma Gay Johnstown (Ohio) * 

Hanes, Orga Pling Mason * 

Hann, Nita Louise Davis Tucker * 

Harbert, Alta Lee Dola Harrison * 

Harker, Jane Pentress Monongalia * * 

Haskins, Edna Mannington Marion * * * 

Heater, Agnes Marie Dawmont Harrison * 

Heater, Magdalene Dawmont Harrison * 

Helms, Freda Newburg Preston * 

Hess, Mildred Wyatt Marion * * 

Hickman, Beatrice Ripley Jackson * 

Hill, Elizabeth Florence . Morgantown Monongalia * 

Hillyard, Lenore Belington Barbour * 

Hillyard, Ruth Belington Barbour * 

Hindman, Mary E Chester Hancock * 

Hinerman, Audrey .Cameron Marshall * 

Hiteshew, Mildred E Lumberport Harrison * 

Hoffman, Laura Bell. . . .Kingwood Preston * * 

Holden, Iva Irene Weston Lewis * 

Huffman, Mertie Mae. . . Mt. Nebo Nicholas * 

Hutson, Dallie St. Marys Pleasants * 

Howard, Opal M Blacksville Monongalia * * 

Ice Lona Mannington Marion * * 

Ice, Mary Ellen Fairmont Marion. * * 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 107 



1st 2nd 

NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S. S. Sem. Sem. Sp. 

Ice, Opal Gay Worthington Marion * * 

Isner, Anna Marie Elkins Randolph * 

Hyer, Hazel lone Flatwoods Braxton * 

Jackson, Mabel Marie . . Monongah Marion * 

Johnson, Besse N Blacksville Monongalia * * 

Johnston, Alice Agnes. . .Hundred Wetzel * 

Jones, Freda Horn Catawba Marion * 

Joyce, Irene Four States Marion * 

Kearns, Margaret R Rowlesburg Preston * 

Keith, Marie Harrisville Ritchie * 

Kessel, Faith Ripley Jackson * 

Knott, Elsie Marie Tunnelton Preston * 

Knott, Pearl E Tunnelton Preston * 

Lake, Ida Simpson Taylor * 

Lawson, Vieva Lucille. . .Jane Lew Lewis * 

Lee, Irene Hundred Wetzel * 

Lemley, Margaret B Burton Wetzel * 

Liljelund, Anna A Mannington Marion * 

Lohr, Ola Grace Kasson Barbour * 

Lochery, Reland Rowlesburg Preston * 

Lynn, Viola Evelyn Colfax Marion * 

Mackey, Eliz. Lurietta. .Woodruff Marshall * * 

Maine, Mattie Hundred Wetzel * 

Marple, Clara Flatwoods Braxton * 

Martin, Dorotha Mannington Marion * 

Martin, Emzie Shinnston Harrison * 

Mason, Ethel Mae Vinton Nicholas * 

Mason, Hildred L Kansotth Marshall * 

Matheny, Wilda M Rivesville Marion * * 

Matthews, Elizabeth — Independence Preston * 

McClure, Irene Virginia . Morgantown Monongalia * * 

Mclntyre, Beulah C Boswell (Pa.) * 

Mclntyre, Meriett Enterprise Harrison * 

McQueen, Esther Fairmont Marion * * 

Menear, Ada M Hutchinson Marion * 

Menear, Marude Thornton Taylor * 

Meo, Mary Teresa Worthington Marion * 

Merrifield, Nedra Maude . Fairmont Marion * * * 

Miller, Anna Mae Elm Grove Ohio * 

Miller, Ruth Edith Tunnelton Preston * 

Monroe, Virginia P Cameron Marshall * 

Morris, Stazie Glover Gap Marion * 

Morgan, Isabelle Eliz . . . Clarksburg Harrison * 

Murray, Ella Fallon Thomas Tucker * 

Murray, Hazel Lee Newburg Preston * 

Maiol, Nellie Jane Fairmont Marion * * 



108 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



1st 2nd 

NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S. S. Sem. Sem. 

Ney, Florence E Fairmont Marion * * 

Ogden, Nina L Wallace Harrison * 

Orr, Hazel Violet Wallace Harrison * 

Parker, Pauline Morgantown Monongalia * 

Pendergast, Genevieve. .Austen Preston * 

Perkins, Reva K Curtin Nicholas * 

Pigott, Edith Grace Worthington Marion 

Plotts, Frances M Chester Hancock * 

Post, Mary Frances Fairmont Marion * * 

Poole, Norma Keller. . . .Scottdale (Pa.) * 

Powell, June Myrtle . . . .Haywood Harrison * 

Prince, Rosetta R Morgantown Monongalia * 

Provance, Mary Fairmont Marion * 

Nethken, Carmen Cincinnati (Ohio) * 

Ray, Myrtle Davis Tucker * 

Redfox, Gladys Clarksburg Harrison * 

Reed, Louise Isabelle. .Watson Marion * 

Reese, Olive Farmington Marion * 

Reger, Edna Leah Belington Barbour * 

Rex, Lucille Hundred Wetzel * 

Richardson, Edith Flatwoods Braxton 

Riggs, Sylvia Dale Grant Town Marion * * 

Rhodes, Etta Grant Town Marion * 

Robertson, Agnes Colfax Marion * 

Robinson, Mae E Woodruff Marshall * 

Robinson, Mildred E . . . Shinnston Harrison * 

Rogers, Ruby Independence Preston * 

Rohrabaugh, Mildred. . .Belington Barbour * 

Scalise, Louise Fairmont Marion * 

Schoonover, Lerona Smithfield Wetzel * 

Shafer, Freda Brit Brown Harrison * 

Showalter, Marguerite . . Hundred Wetzel * 

Shroyer, Lola Virginia. .Thornton Preston * 

Shuman, Nerva Hazel . . Fairview Marion * 

Sine, Mildred Fairview Marion 

Snodgrass, Gladys G. . . .Smithfield Wetzel * 

Southern, Mary Katheryn. Nutter Fort Harrison * 

Smith, Phillis B Monongah Marion * * 

Smith, Lucy M Clarksburg Harrison * 

Smyth, Mildred Lee. . . .Morgantown Monongalia 

Snider, Vivian Moore . . .Grafton Taylor * * 

Snodgrass, Pearl Mannington Marion * * 

Stankus, Anna C Thomas Tucker * * 

Stanley, Mabel Fairmont Marion • * * 

Stemple, Olive Martha. .Masontown Preston 

Straight, Sylvia Rivesville Marion * 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 109 



1st 2nd 

NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S. S. Sem. Sem. Sp. 

Strieker, Elizabeth Mary . Clarksburg Harrison * 

Sturm, Pauline Shinnston Harrison * 

Sumpter, Gertrude H . . .Fairmont Marion - * 

Sutton, Sylvia Frances . .Gassaway Braxton * * 

Swisher, Jettie June Catawba Marion * 

Talkington, Sadie Hundred Wetzel * 

Thomas, Hazel R Hundred Wetzel * 

Thomas, Ruth Hundred Wetzel * 

Thomas, Madeline Barrackville Marion * * 

Tetrick, Vera Shinnston Harrison * * 

Toothman, Estelle Fairview Marion * 

Toothman, Lillie Mae. . .Fairview Marion * * 

Triplett, Delphia Bowden Randolph * 

Tuttle, Opal New Martinsville Wetzel. * * 

Tyre, Anna Elkins Randolph * 

Henderson, Mildred Littleton Wetzel * 

Victor, Frances Fairmont Marion * 

Wagner, Theora B Cameron Marshall * 

Walker, Naomi Fairmont Marion * 

Weaver, Rozella Fairview Marion ** 

Weaver, Mary C Fairview Marion * * 

Williams, Ruth Morgantown Monongalia * 

Webb, Gertrude M Fairmont Marion * 

Wilson, Bessie E Flemington Taylor * 

Wilson, Bess Cowen Webster * 

Wilson, Bonnie Louise. .Belington Barbour * 

Wilson, Susie Virginia. . .Glenn Falls Harrison * * 

Wymer, Floda Jane Lew Lewis * 

Wright, Hilda Newburg Preston * 

Wright, Mary Lillian. . .Rinehart Harrison * 

Wright, Verna Wadestown Monongalia * 

Yeager, Bertha Mae Belington Barbour * 

Yeager, Edna Mannington Marion * 

O'Neal, Ada B Pullman Ritchie * 

Peaslee, Addie B Rowlesburg Preston * 

Leppert, Louise Ravenswood Jackson * 

Ash, Arvil A Metz Marion * 

Atha, Lester Farmington Marion * * 

Barker, Byron C Mona Monongalia * * 

Anderson, Robert E . . . . Rowlesburg Preston * * 

Beale, Bryan Mingo Pocahontas * * * 

Bell, Charles Ross Rector Lincoln * * * 

Birch, Ray Littleton Wetzel * 

Burrell, Mathew Fairmont Marion * 

Church, Beryl J Littleton Wetzel * * 

s, Elam C Fairmont Marion * 



110 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



1st 2nd 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S. S. Sem. Sem. Sp. 

Cubbon, Kenneth Lumberport Harrison * 

Clovis, Walter Pentress Monongalia * * 

Davis, Rufus Furman. . . Hammond Marion 

Gump, Larney Ray Fairview Marion * 

Gorman, Bernard Wells . Grant Town Marion * 

Haggerty, Harland Shinnston Harrison * 

Hamilton, Walter J Mannington Marion * 

Harbert, Richard E Dola Harrison * 

Hann, Harry Ingman. . .Fairmont Marion * 

Haskins, Thomas Mannington Marion * 

Hoffman, Emil Fairmont Marion * 

Ice, Roy Earl Mannington Marion * 

Merrifield, Amos Smithfield Wetzel * 

Monroe, McKinley Lumberport Harrison * 

Monroe, GeorgeLawton .Lumberport Harrison * 

Musgrave, Leander Fairmont Marion * 

Runner, Harrison. Newburg Preston * 

Shields, George, Jr Fairmont Marion * 

Smallwood, Russell E. . .Fairview Marion * 

Smith, Rex Fairmont Marion * * 

Straight, Robert Lee . . . Barrackville Marion * * 

Taylor, Aubrey F Fairmont Marion * 

Tripp, Richard W Fairmont Marion * 

Willis, Mitchell Shinnston Harrison * 

Willis, Paul A Shinnston Harrison * 

Yoho, Audrey Verl Silverhill Wetzel • * * 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 111 



EXTENSION STUDENTS-1923-1924 



NAME 



POST OFFICE 



COUNTY 



Alderson, Ruth Davis 

Allen, Luvenia Hundred 

Allman, C. B Glen Easton . . 

Ammons, Nelle Mannington . . 

Amos, W. Clarence Wyatt 

Amos, Lucille L Wyatt 

Anderson, Asa H Smithfield. . . . 

Ankrom, Ila B Middlebourne . 

Ash, Nettie L Shinnston. . . . 

Atkinson, Lillie Pursglove 

Auvel, G. G Lumberport. . . 



.Tucker 
.Wetzel 
. Marshall 
. Marion 
.Harrison 
.Harrison 
.Wetzel 
.Tyler 
. Harrison 
. Monongalia 
. Harrison 



Backus, Goldie M Parkersburg Wood 

Bailey, Dallas C Glenville Gilmer 

Bailey, Sebie D Buckhannon Upshur 

Ball, Lettie M Maggie Mason 

Barbe, Blanche B Laurel Dale Mineral 

Bartlett, Ola F Grafton Taylor 

Bartlett, Christine Shinnston Harrison 

Bartlett, Conine Fairmont Marion 

Bartley, Bernice Middlebourne Tyler 

Batten, Beryl Morgantown Monongalia 

Batson, C. Williamson Mingo 

Baughman, Dillon P Philippi Barbour 

Baughman, J. E Sutton Braxton 

Baughman, 0. Philippi Barbour 

Beasley, Mrs. Virginia Charleston Kanawha 

Bennett, J. F Pierce Tucker 

Bent, R. K Buckhannon Upshur 

Berry, Leota M Fairmont Marion 

Best, Irene Cameron Marshall 

Bice, Bertha Bridgeport Harrison 

Board, Nellie Gay Jackson 

Bobbitt, J. S Almaris Nicholas 

Boyles, W. L Volga Barbour 

Bramlett, Jas. M Shinnston Harrison 

Bramlett, Pearl L Shinnston Harrison 

Brand, Lois L Broomfield Marion 

Brandenburg, Mabel Belington Barbour 

Briemson, Hilda Sherrard Marshall 

Brown, Chas Morgantown Monongalia 

Brown, Mary Sutton Braxton 

Brown, Caroline Grafton Taylor 

Brown, Ethel Sutton Braxton 

Bryner, Ina F Worhtington Marion 



112 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY 

Burley, Velma Davis Tucker 

Burton, Ella M Tazewell, Va. 

Cale, Claude Terra Alta Preston 

Callaghan, Glenn S Grafton Taylor 

Callaghan, Mrs. Rose Craigsville Nicholas 

Campbell, Carrie C Hugheston Kanawha 

Campbell, Anna Mae Kesler's Cross Lanes Nicholas 

Carder, Orpha Sutton Braxton 

Chapman, Mrs. Mayme. : Morgantown Monongalia 

Chapman, John C Morgantown Monongalia 

Chambers, Genelda M Wheeling Ohio 

Chambers, Anna M Elkdale Kanawha 

Chenoweth, Kenneth E Grafton Taylor 

Chenoweth, Mrs. Kenneth E Grafton Taylor 

Childs, Margaret R Fairmont Marion 

Church, Dorothy Grafton Taylor 

Clark, H. Y Grafton Taylor 

Clarkson, W. C Charleston Kanawha 

Clemmons, Alice R Hilltop Fayette 

Clemmons, J. C Hilltop Fayette 

Clovis, Walter Pentress Monongalia 

Clovis, Mrs. Walter Pentress Monongalia 

Coffindaffer Ruth Jane Lew Lewis 

Cole, J. W Hepzibah Harrison 

Cook, J. Levi Baileysville Wyoming 

Cooper, L. M Sutton Braxton 

Copenhaver, Coralee Wallace .Harrison 

Copenhaver, Ruby Wallace Harrison 

Copp, J. F Fairview Marion 

Cornwell, A. B Philippi Barbour 

Crislip, Ruth Vadis Lewis 

Cross, Elam Carl Bethany Brooke 

Cubbon, Kenneth E Lumberport Harrison 

Cubbon, Claude Lumberport Harrison 

Cunningham Howard Fairmont Marion 

Curtis, Mrs. Sarah Weston Lewis 

Davis, Leulla Cameron Marshall 

Davis, Pauline F Fairmont Marion 

Davis, J. R Maher Mingo 

Davis, R. F Rivesville Marion 

DeBerry, Mary B Terra Alta Preston 

Depler, Hazel Duncombe, Iowa. 

Derenburger, Carroll F Ravenswood Jackson 

Devine, Ethel Hundred Wetzel 

Devine, Lela Hundred Wetzel 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 113 



NAME 



POST OFFICE 



COUNTY 



Donalds, Dorothy Thomas. . . 

Duncan, H. L Shinnston. 

Durrett, Eleanor Fairmont. . 

Durrett, Elizabeth Fairmont. 

Dyer, Flossie Philippi . . 



.Tucker 
.Harrison 
. Marion 
. Marion 
.Barbour 



Edwards, Katherine Belington. 

Eldridge, Myrtle Erie, Pa. 



.Barbour 



Fairfax, Myra E Ronceverte Greenbrier 

Fankhauser, Ruth G Paden City Wetzel 

Faust, Mrs. Carter L Fairmont Marion 

Fauss, Leroy C Williams own Wood 

Field, Inez Kingwood Preston 

Fisher, Mrs. Rhea H Grafton Taylor 

Fishback, Mrs. Gail Fairmont Marion 

Flanagan, Ruby B Fairmont Marion 

Fleming, Joseph H St. Marys Pleasants 

Forbes, Margaret L Morgantown Monongalia 

Ford, Alma Independence Taylor 

Fraley, Mrs. Arlie Huntington Cabell 

Frame, Katherine H Chearleston Kanawha 

Funk, Susan P Rowlesburg Preston 

Furbee, Bessie Terra Alta Preston 

Gainer, Wanda Belington Barbour 

Garrett, J. W Flemington. Taylor 

Geren, Marguherita Ravenswood Jackson 

Giles, Dorothea Fairmont Marion 

Glover, Verna V Ravenswood Jackson 

Goddin, Elmer Elkins Randolph 

Goodwin, Mrs. Florence Benwood Marshall 

Gray, Gladys M Summersville Nicholas 

Gray, L. Eura Cameron Marshall 

Green, Geraldine Charleston Kanawha 

Green Mrs. W. T Charleston Kanawha 

Griffen Nellie M Wyatt Harrison 

Griffen, L. E Wyatt Harrison 

Grose, Lois M Wheeling Ohio 

Grose, Mrs. E. A Fairmont Marion 

Grose, Artha M Fairmont Marion 

Gumm, Boyce L Frametown Braxton 



Hale, E. E Fairmont 

Hall, Florence M Williamson 

Hall, Belle P Morgantown. . : . 

HalL Inez M Weston 

Hall, Mrs. Theodosia Cleveland. Ohio. 



. Marion 
. Mingo 
. Monongalia 
. Lewis 



114 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY 

Halterman, Lona P Mathias Hardy 

Hann, Nita L Davis Tucker 

Hanes, Orga E Pliny Putnam 

Harbert, Richard E Lumberport Harrison 

Harpold, H. H Metz Marion 

Harriman, Nellie Kingwood Preston 

Harris, Dorothy Glen Easton Marshall 

Harker, Jane Pentress Monongalia 

Hartrick, Geo. A Monongah Marion 

Haught, Rilla M New Martinsville Wetzel 

Hayhurst, Jemima Fairmont Marion 

Heflin, Ada W Grafton Taylor 

Hess, Rilla Farmington. Marion 

Hicks, Ernie M Renick Greenbrier 

Hicks, Dora Cameron Marshall 

Hill, Elizabeth F Morgantown Monongalia 

Hillyard, Lenore Belington Barbour 

Hillyard, Ruth Belington Barbour 

Himelrick, Essie Burton Wetzel 

Himelrick, Josephine Burton Wetzel 

Holden, Iva Weston Lewis 

Hoyt, Viola Thomas Tucker 

Hubbs, Sophia V Spencer Roane 

Hudkins, Lucille Gassaway Braxton 

Hughes, Gae Enterprise Harrison 

Humphries, Lizetta Charleston Kanawha 

Hunt, E. A Lumberport Harrison 

Hunt, Garrett L Burton Wetzel 

Ice, Mrs. Delcie M Sistersville Tyler 

Ice, Edith M Fairmont Marion 

Ice, Lona Mannington Marion 

Iden, Josie Davis Tucker 

Jaco, Mattie Grafton Taylor 

Jenkins, Lula M Terra Alta Preston 

Jenkins, Mary N Clarksburg Harrison 

Johnson, Gail V Blacksville Monongalia 

Judge, Belva G Pine Grove Wetzel 

Keim, Mabel C Terra Alta Preston 

Keith, Marie Harrisville Ritchie 

Kelley, Eunice M .Grafton Taylor 

Kennedy, Eva Hundred Wetzel 

Kessell, Zorah Ripley Jackson 

Killen, M. Kathleen Terra Alta Preston 

Kimble, Gertrude Paden City Wetzel 






FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 115 



NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY 

Kincaid, Lena Paden City Wetzel 

Knott, Phoebe V Shepherdstown Jefferson 

Lanham, Nell A Clarksburg Harrison 

Leach, Emma H Grafton Taylor 

Leonard, Louise Fairmont Marion 

Leppert, M. Louise Ravenswood Jackson 

Lerner, Golda W Hartford Mason 

Linger, Ernestine Roanoke Lewis 

Lunsford, Nelle Weston Lewis 

Mackey, Luretta Cameron Marshall 

Macintosh, V. Elizabeth A lpine, N. J. 

Mahaffey, Frankie Enterprise Harrison 

Marten, Mayme Webster Springs Webster 

Martin, A. G Shinnston Harrison 

Martin, L. H Shinnston Harrison 

Martin, Chester W Shinnston Harrison 

Martin, Nina Terra Alta Preston 

Martin, P. D .Hundred .Wetzel 

Mason, Bonnie Philippi Barbour 

Mason, Hildred Kausooth Marshall 

Mason, Mrs. Bonnie Terra Alta Preston 

Mayers, Betty Fairmont Marion 

McCarty, Pearl S Fairmont Marion 

McCarty, Mrs. Clyde Shinnston Harrison 

McClure, Irene Morgantown Monongalia 

McElroy, Eleanor D Fairmont Marion 

McKinney, Matilda Fairmont Marion 

McKinney, Myrtle Fairmont Marion 

McLaughlin, Nelle Y Marlinton Pocahontas 

Metz, Minnie A Mannington Marion 

Miller, Grace A Grafton Taylor 

Miller, J. K Grafton Taylor 

Mitchell, Magdalene Elm Grove... Ohio 

Monroe, Lawton Lumberport Harrison 

Monroe, McEanley Lumberport Harrison 

Moore, Ruby Wallace Harrison 

Morris, Naomi M Fairmont Marion 

Morrison, H L Hundred Wetzel 

Morrison, W. B Kenova Wayne 

Morrison, Geraldine Philippi Barbour 

Morton, Arnold Caden-on-Gauley Webster 

Murray, Ella F Davis Tucker 

Nonas, Eleanor J Willow Pleasants 



116 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



NAME 



POST OFFICE 



COUNTY 



Ocheltree, Katherine Weston 

O'Dea, Genevieve Littleton 

O'Donnell, Earle Parkersburg. . 

Offutt, Edna Romney 

Ogden, Nina L Wallace 

Ogdin, Caroline Williamstown. 



.Lewis 

.Wetzel 

.Wood 

.Hampshire 

. Harrison 

.Wood 



Page, Laura B Williamstown Wood 

Parrack, Horace Terra Alta Preston 

Parrish, Archel Mannington Marion 



Parsons, Flora Ripley 

Paulie, Mrs. Ernest Pierce 

Peaslee, Addie Rowlesburg. 

Peterson, Oda K Weston 

Peterson, Gertrude Weston 

Phillips, Inez E Cameron 

Piggott, L. Wilsonburg. 

Plant, Mabel R Lumberport . 

Poling, Sherman T Philippi 

Powell, Cecyle M ; Blacksville. . 

Powers, Margaret Virginia Cameron . . . 

Powers, Mrs. Lucy B Cameron 

Presson, Mrs. Kate Cowen 

Price, Mrs. Geo Fairmont 

Pritt, Emma Elkins...... . 

Putnam, Robert B Fairmont. . . 



.Jackson 
.Tucker 
.Preston 
.Lewis 
.Lewis 
. Marshall 
.Harrison 
. Harrison 
.Barbour 
. Monongalia 
. Marshall 
.Marshall 
.Webster 
. Marion 
. Randolph 
. Marion 



Quinet, Yvonne. 



. Morgantown Monongali 



Randall, Estelle Shinnston Harrison 

Randolph, Mrs. H. T West Milford Harrison 

Rector, Hazel Shinnston Harrison 

Rector, Winnie Shinnston Harrison 

Reger, Edna Belington Barbour 

Rexroad, Otis Kingsville, Ohio. 

Richmond, Mrs. Edna B Fairmont Marion 

Rider, P. M Rivesville Marion 

Ridenour, R. S Grafton Taylor 

Righter, Mary E Williamson Mingo 

Righter, Chas. L Shinnston Harrison 

Robbins, Ava M Fairmont Marion 

Robey, Cecile L Masontown Preston 

Roberts, Odgar Hundred Wetzel 

Robinson, Fred D Grafton Taylor 

Robinson, Mabel Williamson Mingo 

Robinson, Daisy '. Williamson Mingo 

Robinson, John G Wallace Harrison 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 117 



NAME 



POST OFFICE 



COUNTY 



Robinson, Mildred V Fairmont 

Rogers, Fred S Independence. 

Rogers, Cephas Independence. 

Roper, Mrs. Katherine P Huntington. . . 

Rose, Ethel Heaters 



. Marion 
.Preston 
. Preston 
.Cabell 
.Braxton 



Rose, Dessie M Fairmont Marion 

Ross, Ruth Fairmont Marion 

Rowley, C. R Ravenswood Jackson 

Rush, W. E Earnshaw Wetzel 

Rymer, Olive Mannington Marion 



r, Ida Parkersburg Wood 

Sandy, Howard L Shinnston Harrison 

Saunders, 0. G Terra Alta Preston 

Saunders, Emmett B Clarksburg Harrison 

Schilansky, Lilia. Thomas Tucker 

Scott, Freda S Barboursville Cabell 

Scott, W. W Barboursville Cabell 

Scott, Goldie Philippi Barbour 

Scott, Raymond Smithfield Wetzel 

Scott, Mrs. Ruth H Grafton Taylor 

Seckman, Bess H Belmont Pleasants 

Sellers, Louise Fairmont Marion 

Shaffer, Dora Philippi Barbour 

Sharps, A. B Lumberport Harrison 

Shepherd, Bessie Belington Barbour 

Shinn, Virginia Belington Barbour 

Simmons, Artie C Rowlesburg Preston 

Skinner, Pearl Pliny Putnam 



Skinner, Minter P Gassaway. ...... 

Skiles, Ada F Morgantown. . . . 

Slaubaugh, Melvin Horse Shoe Run. 

Sloan, Waynie Terra Alta 

Smith, Nellie C Waverly 

Smith, Sylva A Procfor 

Smith, Bessie Middlebourne. . . 

Smyth, Mildred Morgantown. . . . 

Snider, V. B Valley Head 

Snodgrass, John F Mannington 

Snodgrass, Gypsy Smithfield 

Snopps, Elizabeth Bulltown 

Snyder, Lillian E Hundred 

Southern, Mary Nutter Fort 

Sprigg, Georgia Sutton 

Spurgeon, Lula M Morgantown. . . . 

Stalnaker, Edra Belington 

Stephenson, Sarah Weston 



.Braxton 

. Monongalia 

.Preston 

.Preston 

.Wood 

.Wetzel 

.Tyler 

. Monongalia 

.Randolph 

. Marion 

.Wetzel 

.Braxton 

.Wetzel 

.Harrison 

.Braxton 

. Monongalia 

.Barbour 

.Lewis 



118 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



NAME 



POST OFFICE 



COUNTY 



Stern, Beatrice Charleston. . . . 

Street, W. A Belington 

Stuart, Frank Philippi 

Sturm, Ella Shinnston 

Sturm, Pauline Shinnston 

Summers, Ada Belington 

Swann, Mary F Middlebourne. 

Swartz, Eleanor Thomas 

Swisher, Jettie J Catawba 



.Kanawha 
. Barbour 
. Barbour 
. Harrison 
. Harrison 
. Barbour 
.Tyler 
.Tucker 
. Marion 



Talbott, Ruby Philippi Barbour 

Talkington, Mae Hundred Wetzel 

Talkington, Sadie Hundred Wetzel 

Teter, Mollie D Thomas Tucker 

Teter, Evelyn Belington Barbour 

Thayer, Marguerite Grafton Taylor 

Thompson, Nelle Middlebourne Tyler 

Todd, Ruth Cameron Marshall 

Toivonen, Rachel Fairmont Marion 



Williams, Lottie Hamilton, N. C. 

Williams, Ruth L Morgantown. . . . 

Wilkins, Inez Independence . . . 

Wilkinson, Florence H Grafton 

Wilmoth, Seva R Belington 

Wilson, Clara Fairmont 

Wilson, Lola Hendricks 

Wilson, Bonnie Belington 

Withers, Lelia Grafton 

Wolfe, Mary V Terra Alta 

Wolfe, Tressie Terra Alta 

Wood, Walter A Grafton 

Woodford, 0. J Philippi 

Wotring, Leola Morgantown. . . . 

Wright, Edna Newburg 



. Monongalia 

. Preston 

.Taylor 

.Barbour 

. Marion 

.Tucker 

. Barbour 

.Taylor 

.Preston 

.Preston 

.Taylor 

.Barbour 

. Monongalia 

.Preston 



Yoho, Flossie Howard . 



. Marshall 



Zellar, Margaret Terra Alta. 



. Preston 



Toothman, Estelle Fairview. 

Tucker, Faye Canfield. . 

Turner, Roy Hundred . 



. Marion 
. Braxton 
Wetzel 



Uhl, Crystal Parkersburg. 

Vaughn, J. Sutton 



.Wood 
. Braxton 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 119 



NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY 

Wagner, Theora B Cameron Marshall 

Walker, T. E Frame Kanawha 

Walker, Naomi Fairmont Marion 

Warder, Ina M Grafton Taylor 

Wells, Howard Blacksville Monongalia 

Wendell, Mrs. Nelle T Terra Alta Preston 

Wendell, Mrs. Lelia Terra Alta Preston 

West, Mrs. Lula H Moorefield Hardy 

White, Grace Grafton Taylor 

White, Florence H Grafton Taylor 

Whitehair, Geo. W Terra Alta Preston 

Whytsell, Dale Burnsville Braxton 

Whytsell, C. A Burnsville Braxton 

Wickwire, Hattie M Albright Preston 



120 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 



EXTENSION DEPARTMENT ENROLLMENT BY COUNTIES 

Marion 50 

Harrison 46 

Preston 29 

Barbour 28 

Taylor 27 

Wetzel 25 

Monongalia 21 

Marshall , 16 

Braxton 15 

Tucker 13 

Lewis 12 

Kanawha 10 

Jackson 8 

Wood 8 

Mingo 6 

Tyler 6 

Cabell 4 

Nicholas 4 

Ohio 3 

Pleasants 3 

Randolph 3 

Webster 3 

Fayette 2 

Greenbrier 2 

Hardy 2 

Mason 2 

Putnam 2 

Upshur 2 

Gilmer 

Hampshire 

Jefferson 

Mineral 

Pocahontas 

Ritchie 

Roane. 

Wayne 

Wyoming 



STATES 



Ohio 

Iowa 

North Carolina. 
New Jersey. . . . 

Virginia 

Pennsylvania... 



FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 121 



ENROLLMENT OF RESIDENCE STUDENTS BY COUNTIES AND STATES 

Marion 375 

Harrison 112 

Wetzel 64 

Preston 52 

Taylor 34 

Monongalia 32 

Barbour 27 

Braxton 24 

Lewis 23 

Marshall 15 

Randolph 14 

Tucker 12 

Webster 8 

Nicholas 6 

Wood 6 

Jackson 6 

Pleasants 6 

Pocahontas 6 

Tyler 6 

Ohio 5 

Ritchie 4 

Roane 3 

Hancock 3 

Mineral 3 

Upshur 3 

Pendleton 3 

Greenbrier 1 

Grant 1 

Hampshire 1 

Lincoln 1 

Gilmer 1 

McDowell 1 

Mingo 1 

Morgan 1 

STATES 

Pennsylvania 4 

Ohio 4 

Indiana 2 

Maryland 1 

Washington, D. C 1 



122 FAIRMONT STATE NORMAL SCHOOL 

SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT FOR 1923-1924 

Men Women Total 

Post Graduates 2 

College Seniors 2 

College Juniors 14 

College Sophomores 5 

College Freshmen 39 

Standard Normal Seniors 32 

Standard Normal Juniors 30 

Short Normal Seniors 37 

Music Students 2 



Total 

Counted Twice . 



Total 163 

Extension Students 95 



Total 258 

Counted Twice 24 



1 


3 


6 


8 


64 


78 


12 


17 


26 


65 


214 


246 


167 


197 


219 


256 


48 


50 


757 


920 


16 


16 


741 


904 


274 


369 


1015 


1273 


85 


109 



Different Students Enrolled 234 930 1164 



i/\(^L4^0^VL. 




Fairmont 
State Normal School 

A Teachers College 




FAIRMONT, WEST VIRGINIA 
1925 - 1926 





Fairmont 


State 


Normal School 


A 


Teachers College 




/gS\ 




^^^ 


FAIRMONT, WEST VIRGINIA 




1925-1926 



?7 



^ 



AN EXPLANATORY FOREWORD 

Since some misunderstanding seems to prevail about 
the present status of Fairmont. Normal, an explanation 
is desirable. 

The name of this school remains as it was : "Fairmont 
State Normal School"; and it will so remain until it is 
changed by act of the West Virginia legislature. But 
the school, by official act of the State Board of Educa- 
tion, has been given permission to add two years of college 
work and to grant the degree of A.B. in Education, and 
the first degrees were granted in June of 1924. This 
institution, therefore, while a Normal School in name, is 
in reality a teachers college. It is a member of the 
American Association of Teachers Colleges and of the 
Southern Association of Teacher Training Institutions, 
and graduates have already entered graduate schools 
without conditions. 

This change does not mean that the established nor- 
mal courses for the training of elementary teachers will 
be eliminated; it means merely that Fairmont Normal 
will add to its established courses another course, a course 
to train supervisors and teachers for junior and senior 
high schools. 

Fairmont Normal is, therefore, still a teacher- 
training institution, not at all a general, liberal-arts col- 
lege. But those who do not desire to teach may neverthe- 
less attend the school and secure college credit for the 
academic work they take. Two or three years of college 
credit may thus be earned. 



CALENDAR FOR 1925-26 

First Semester opens September 15. 
Christmas vacation begins December 18. 
School resumes January 5. 
First Semester closes January 29. 
Second semester opens February 2. 
Spring vacation begins April 21. 
Spring Term opens April 27. 
Commencement June 11. 
Summer Term opens June 14. 
Summer Term closes August 13. 

The regular school year is divided into two semesters 
of eighteen weeks each. But beginning on April 27 a 
special spring term of six weeks and beginning on June 
14 a special term of nine weeks are held. 



THE STATE BOARD OF CONTROL 

James S. Lakin, President Charleston 

J. Walter Barnes, Treasurer Charleston 

C. A. Jackson Charleston 

Roy Reger, Secretary Charleston 

The State Board of Control has charge of the finan- 
cial and business affairs of all the State institutions. 

THE STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 

George M. Ford, President Charleston 

L. W. Burns, Vice-President Martinsburg 

William G. Conley Charleston 

W. C. Cook Welch 

Bernard McClaugherty Bluefield 

Earle W. Oglebay Wheeling 

Mrs. Lenna Lowe Yost Huntington 

J. Frank Marsh, Secretary . Charleston 

The State Board of Education has charge of all mat- 
ters of a purely scholastic nature concerning the State 
educational institutions. 



FACULTY 1924-25 

Joseph Rosier President 

P.Pd. Salem College 1895, A.M. Salem College 
1915. Superintendent Salem Public Schools 
1891-1893; City Superintendent Salem Public 
Schools 1891-1893; County Superintendent Har- 
rison County Schools 1893-1896; instructor Glen- 
ville State Normal School 1895-1896; instructor 
in Fairmont State Normal School 1896-1900; 
Superintendent City Schools of Fairmont 1900- 
1916; present position 1915. 

Walter Barnes Dean of Instruction, Head English Dept. 

A.B. West Virginia University 1905, A.M. Har- 
vard 1911. Four years in rural and village 
schools, principal Keyser High School 1905-1906; 
superintendent Salem Public Schools 1906-1907; 
assistant principal and head of English Depart- 
ment Glenville State Normal School, 1907-1914; 
assistant to the president and head of the Eng- 
lish Department Fairmont State Normal School, 
1914; dean of the college 1923; instructor in sum- 
mer school West Virginia University, 1914, 1915, 
1917; in State Normal School at Towson, Mary- 
land, 1916; University of Pittsburgh, 1918, at 
University of Pennsylvania, 1920-1921; at Chi- 
cago University 1922; present position 1914. 

♦Laura E. Briggs Art 

Student at Ferris Institute, Big Rapids Mich- 
igan; State Normal, Kalamazoo, Michigan; Uni- 
versity (summer) Ann Arbor, Michigan; Art 
Institute (summer) Chicago, Illinois; Columbia 
(summer) New York City. Six years supervisor 
Music and Drawing, seven years Supervisor Art, 
Fairmont High School; present position 1918. 

Jasper H. Colebank Physical Education 

Fairmont Normal, 1914, West Virginia Univer- 
sity 1914-16, summer session University of Illi- 
nois 1922; taught seven years in rural schools, 
Lumberport High School 1916-1917, Washington 
Irving High School, 1917-18, U. S. Army 1918, 
Grafton High School 1919-24; present position 
1924. 

*On leave of absence 1924-1925. 



Fairmont State Normal School 



*Eva Day Compton Home Economics 

B.S. West Virginia University 1919; A.M. Teach- 
ers College, Columbia University, 1925; Pied- 
mont High School 1916-1917; Keyser High School 
1917-20; present position 1921. 

♦Virginia Gaskill Home Economics 

Household Arts Diploma Mechanics Institute 
1916; B.S. Columbia University 1924; A.M. Col- 
umbia 1925; Fairmont High School 1916-19; in- 
structor in summer school Concord Normal 1917- 
1918; present position 1919. 

Blanche Gibson Education; Hostess at Morrow Hall 

A.B. West Virginia University. Taught eighteen 
years; present position 1921. 

Lynn Ray Howard Art 

B.S. Teachers College, Columbia University 1924, 
art graduate National Park Seminary 1920, sum- 
mer session West Virginia University 1924; 
present position 1924. 

♦Maude M. Hull Education 

A.B. West Virginia University 1919; summer 
school Columbia University 1921-1922; A.M. 
Teachers College, Columbia University 1925. 
Four years in one-room country schools; three 
years in village graded schools; six years in the 
training school of the Fairmont State Normal 
School; four years in the Education Department 
of High Schools; present position 1921. 

Ethel Ice French; Registrar 

A.B. West Virginia University 1910; A.M. Teach- 
ers College, Columbia University 1921, one year 
in one-room country schools; two years in graded 
schools; two years in Clarksburg High School; 
present position 1912. 

Nell Lanham Leonian Home Economics 

B.S. in Home Economics West Virginia Univer- 
sity. Demonstration School, Concord State Nor- 
mal School, 1917-1918; Demonstration School, 
Marshall College 1918-19; Central Junior High, 
Charleston, 1920-1921; present position 1923. 

♦On leave of absence 1924-1925. 



Fairmont State Normal School 



Louise Leonard Education 

A.B. in Education Fairmont State Normal School 
1924, summer session Teachers College Columbia 
University 1924; taught several years in elemen- 
tary schools including some years as critic teach- 
er in Butcher School, Fairmont; present position 
1924. 

Laura F. Lewis English 

A.B. West Virginia University 1907; A.M. Col- 
umbia University 1918. Five years teaching in 
ungraded rural schools; two years principal of 
graded rural schools in Harrison County; three 
years in graded city schools at Mannington; 
three years in Fairmont High School; one year 
in Denominational College, Ohio Valley; seven- 
teen years in state normal schools; one year in 
West Virginia University; present position 1913. 

E. L. Lively Sociology 

B.S. West Virginia University 1912; A.M. Ohio 
State University 1920. Five years in public 
schools; three years principal of junior high; two 
years high school; present position 1912. 

E. E. Mercer Mathematics 

A.B. University of Nashville 1891; student Har- 
vard summer school, summers of 1904-1906. 
Teacher in Waco College, Waco, Texas, 1892- 
1893; principal of schools, Berkeley Springs, W. 
Va., 1893-1895; teacher in Fairmont State Nor- 
mal 1895-1899; principal Fairmont High School 
1899-1901; present position 1901. 

M. E. McCarty Mathematics ; Director of Extension 

A.B. University of Michigan 1915; A.M. Univer- 
sity of Michigan 1922. Principal of graded 
schools of Wetzel County 1909-12; rural schools 
of West Virginia 1902-1907; principal of High 
School, Williamson, W. Va., 1915-23; present 
position 1923. 

Mrs. N. R. C. Morrow English; Chaplain 

Ph.B. University of Chicago 1917; A.M. Beaver 
College (honorary) 1890; post-graduate work 
University of Chicago; studied in the West Vir- 
ginia University and Columbia University; pres- 
ent position 1899. 



Fairmont State Normal School 



Irene Osborn Music 

B.S. in music, University of Illinois, 1924. First 
grade and music teacher in Stephensburg and 
Garwood, New Jersey, 1907-1910; the same in 
West New York, New Jersey 1910-1916; attended 
New York College of Music 1911-1914; Ithaca 
Conservatory of Music 1916-1917; music teacher 
in Junior High School, Morgantown, 1918-1920; 
music supervisor, Morgantown 1921; summer ses- 
sion Cornell University 1921; present position 
1921. 

Paul F. Opp English; Director of Publicity 

A.B. Mt. Union College 1918; A.M. Columbia 
University 1923; Professional Diploma, Teacher 
of English Columbia University 1923; Squadron 
Athletic Director U. S. Navy one year. Farm- 
ington High School English Department one 
year; present position 1923. 

Mahala Dorcas Prichard History; Dean of Women 

A.B. West Virginia University; A.M. Teachers 
College Columbia University; Professional Di- 
ploma, Dean of Women, Columbia University. 
Three years in public schools; present position 
1912. 

Harold F. Rogers Chemistry 

A.B. West Virginia University 1901; A.M. Har- 
vard 1908 ; studied and practiced pharmacy, sum- 
mers 1896-1906 and the year following gradua- 
tion at West Virginia University. Instructor of 
Physics and Chemistry, Fairmont State Normal 
School, 1903-1904; similar position Glenville 
State Normal School, 1905-1906; assistant prin- 
cipal, ibid. 1905-1906; West Virginia University 
1919-1920, and twelve weeks summer term 1920; 
present position 1908. 

Marjorie Ruth Ross Biology and Geography 

B.S. 1920, A.M. 1924 George Peabody College for 
Teachers; two years in rural schools West Vir- 
ginia; two years in Central High School, Nash- 
ville, Tenn. ; supervisor of science in Demon- 
stration School, Peabody College; nature-study 
instructor in Peabody College, and Camp 
Nakanawa; graduate study at University of 
Michigan, Biological Station, summer 1924; 
present position 1924. 



Fairmont State Normal School 9 

Francis Shreve Head of Education Department 

A.B. West Virginia University 1909; A.M. Ohio 
State University 1912; Ph.D. Peabody College 
1921. Four years in rural schools; three years 
principal of elementary schools; one year prin- 
cipal of high school; two years Professor of Ed- 
ucation, Wesleyan College; present position 1915. 

Watt Stewart Head of History Department 

A.B. West Virginia Wesleyan. 1920; one summer 
graduate study at Teachers College; three sum- 
mers graduate study at Chicago University. 
Three years in graded schools; four years in sec- 
ondary schools; present position 1923. 

Ruth Strieby Physical Education 

A.B. West Virginia University 1924, Sargent 
School for Physical Education 1921-1923; present 
position 1924. 

Edna Tarleton Home Economics 

B.S.H.E. West Virginia University; taught one 
year in public school; present position 1924. 

Frank S. White Education 

A.B. University of Pittsburgh 1916; A.M. George 
Peabody College 1923. Rural schools of Wood 
and Harrison Counties; principal of Shinnston 
Schools 1903-1904; principal of Adamston School 
1904-1907; principal of Northview School 1907- 
1908; assistant principal of Flemington High 
School 1909-1911; principal of Barnes School, 
Fairmont 1913-1917; present position 1917. 

Kathryn Beltzhoover Piano and Organ 

Kathryn Browning, A.B Dietitian 

Mrs. Emory F. McKinney Librarian 

Blanche Price Secretary and Bursar 

Additional Summer Term Instructors, 1924 

I. O. Ash, Supt Schools, Shinnston Education 

A. J. Gibson, Prin. East Side High School Education 

Roy C. Hall, Morgantown High School History 

Charlotte M. Skinner, Dunkirk, N. Y Penmanship 

E. B. Whaley, Supt. Schools, Lumberport Education 



10 Fairmont State Normal School 

Additional Spring Term Instructors, 1925 

Eloise McCorkle Biology 

Edwin B. Richardson Education 

Additions to the Faculty for 1925-26 

C. O. Haught Physics; Chemistry 

A.B. West Virginia Wesleyan College 1922; M.S. 
Ohio State University 1925. One year teacher in 
rural schools of Marion County, two years teach- 
er of chemistry and physics, Mannington High 
School, graduate assistant in chemistry Ohio 
State University 1924-1925. 

Edna Bradley Richmond Education 

A.B. in Education Fairmont State Normal School 
1925, summer session Teachers College Columbia 
University 1925. Taught several years in ele- 
mentary schools including some years as critic 
teacher. 

Teachers in the elementary schools at Jayenne and 
Barrackville and in the Butcher school in Fairmont and 
certain teachers in the high schools at Barrackville and 
East Side, Fairmont, are listed as part-time members of 
the faculty. 



FACULTY COMMITTEES 

Classification and Credits 

Mr. Barnes Mr. Shreve Mr. Lively 

Mr. Rosier Miss Ice 

Placement of Graduates 

Mr. McCarty Mr. Barnes Mr. Rosier 

Employment for Students 

Miss Price Miss Prichard Mr. Rosier 

Athletics 

Mr. Colebank Miss Toivenen Mr. Lively 

Social 

Miss Prichard Miss Beltzhoover Mr. Opp 

Lecture Course 

Mr. Lively Miss Briggs Miss Ice 

Library 

Mrs. McKinney Mr. Stewart Mr. Shreve 

Chapel 

Mrs. Morrow Miss Osborn Miss Compton 

Com m encement 

Mr. Rogers Mrs. McKinney Miss Ross 



CLASS ADVISERS 

Normal Junior Miss Ross 

Normal Senior Mr. Lively 

College Freshman Mr. Rogers 

College Sophomore Mr. White 

College Juniors__ Mr. Stewart 

College Seniors Mr. Shreve 



INSTRUCTIONS TO PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS 

Read this catalog and the student hand-book through 
carefully, then if there are any questions you wish to ask, 
write directly to Joseph Rosier, President State Normal 
School, Fairmont, West Virginia. 

The following classes of students are eligible for en- 
trance at Fairmont Normal: 

1. High school graduates. 

2. High school students who have finished 15 units 
of high school work. (Such students must make up an 
additional unit of credit during the first year). 

3. Persons eighteen years of age or over who have 
not finished a high school course. (But such persons 
cannot graduate from any course until they have credit 
for a high school course). 

If you are to stay at home while attending the Nor- 
mal, you need not make any arrangements previous to 
enrolling. Come to the Normal School building on Sep- 
tember 15 or as soon thereafter as possible, and directions 
for enrolling will be given you after you arrive at the 
building. 

If you are not able to remain at home while you are 
attending Normal School, it is best to make arrangements 
for room and board before you come to Fairmont. All 
young women entering the Normal will be expected to 
engage rooms at the woman's hall, unless they have per- 
mission to stay with relatives or friends in the city. In 
any case you should write Miss Dorcas Prichard, Dean 
of Women, concerning the place where you are to stay 
while a student in the Normal. 

If you are a graduate of a four-year high school, you 
become, upon your entrance, a member of the Junior 
Normal or the Freshman College class. Your high 
school grades will be accepted at their full value, regard- 
less of what the subjects are. Ask the principal of the 
high school from which you graduated to send a full and 
accurate statement of all the work you did, to Miss Ethel 



14 Fairmont State Normal School 

Ice, Registrar. If possible, have this done before you 
enter the Normal School. 

If you have done advanced work in some college or 
normal school of approved standing, the work you have 
done there will be accepted at its full value on either 
Normal or College courses. Have all the credits you have 
at other institutions certified to the Registrar of the 
Normal. When you send in this statement, request 
that the committee on classifications and credits pass 
upon your credits and give you your rating. This com- 
mittee will tell you how much work you have to com- 
plete to finish the course you wish to enter. (But see 
pages 31 and 32 for residence requirements.) 

If you are a teacher of maturity and experience, some 
credit on the Normal School Courses will be granted you 
by the committee of classifications and credits. The 
amount of credit given varies with the value of the ex- 
perience in teaching as determined by the committee, but 
in the Standard Normal and College Courses it cannot 
exceed a total of 10 semester hours. Credit for exper- 
ience will be given only after the student has done in the 
institution one term's work which is considered satisfac- 
tory by the committee. 

INFORMATION FOR NEW STUDENTS 

The Fairmont Normal Hand-book contains detailed 
information concerning the regulations and customs of 
the school. Students should secure and study this hand- 
book as soon as they enter school. 

It is especially desirable that students enroll on the 
first day of the semester or term. On that one day only 
an effective system of enrolling students rapidly and 
accurately is in motion; after that day students have to 
await the leisure of class adviser, secretary, and regis- 
trar. Moreover, students who enroll late sometimes find 
that certain courses which they desire to take have al- 
ready been filled to capacity. After the first three weeks 
of a term no one is permitted to enroll except by permis- 
sion of the dean of instruction. 



Fairmont State Normal School 15 

Students are supervised in their study assignments by 
their class advisers. No change of any kind can be made 
in the study assignment except by permission of these 
class advisers, and no change can be made after four 
weeks of the semester have elapsed except by permission 
of the dean of instruction. 

New students should not ask to carry more than 16 
hours' work. 

Text books and school supplies may be purchased in 
the Administration building. 

Students are expected to attend the classes regularly 
and to keep up their work. Teachers report to the dean 
of instruction any failure to live up to this standard. If, 
after a reasonable time, the student is still indifferent, he 
may be asked to discontinue certain courses or to with- 
draw from the school. 

When students are at the school building, they are ex- 
pected to be in class, in the library, in the rooms ap- 
pointed for discussion and study, or in authorized extra- 
curricular activities or organizations. 

The grading system is as follows: "A" excellent; "B" 
good; "C" average; "D" fair; "E" failure. The teacher 
may, at his discretion, give less credit to any student 
than the course usually carries; he may, for example, cut 
down to one, two or three semester hours the credit in a 
four-hour course. 

Students who fail to pass as much as one-half of the 
total number of hours assigned to them are not permitted 
to enroll for the following term without permission of 
the dean of instruction. Students who leave school or 
drop out of any course without permission are marked 
"E" in the courses they are enrolled for. 

A report of progress is sent to the students' parents 
or guardian at the mid-semester, and a report of credits 
and grades is sent at the end of the term or semester. 

Upon the students is placed the responsibility of 
conforming to the graduation requirements. Class ad- 
visers will assist their students in this matter, but the 
students are held directly responsible. Each student 



16 Fairmont State Normal School 

should study the curriculum he is pursuing and make 
sure that he is taking the requisite amount of work in- 
cluding the required work. Only the committee of class- 
ification and credits can make changes in the graduation 
requirements for any student. 

The committee on placement of graduates assists stu- 
dents in securing positions to teach. The committee, 
however, accepts no responsibility in the matter and does 
not promise to secure positions; its function is to assist 
and collaborate with the students. 

Chapel is held once a week, on Thursday morning at 
ten o'clock. Students who are in the administration build- 
ing at that hour are expected to attend chapel. 

THE FUNCTION AND PLACE OF THE SCHOOL 

Fairmont State Normal School exists to prepare 
teachers. More specifically, it exists to prepare teachers 
and supervisors for the elementary and high schools of 
central and northern West Virginia. It is not in any sense 
a competitor with the high schools of the state or with 
liberal arts colleges or professional institutions of the 
state; it has its own special field of endeavor and is satis- 
fied to cultivate that field. 

The Normal School graduates about two hundred 
teachers every year. It sends out, to twenty-five or more 
counties in this part of West Virginia, well-prepared and 
well-trained young men and women to teach in the cities, 
villages, and rural communities. Each one of these teach- 
ers influences twenty or thirty boys and girls every year, 
so that the work of the Normal School is affecting the 
educational conditions all over this section of the state. 
Undoubtedly, not a little of the progressive, modern, 
wholesome spirit observable in the schools, much of the 
improvement in teaching methods, much of the educational 
reform that has been sweeping over the central and 
northern counties of the state, has been due to the in- 
fluence of Fairmont Normal. 

The normal school is always the pivotal point of a 
public school system. If the normal school is ineffective, 






Fairmont State Normal School 17 

the entire school system suffer, directly and seriously. The 
preparation and training of teachers is therefore an ab- 
solute essential to the success of a system of public edu- 
cation. Fairmont Normal School clearly recognizes this 
fact, and is endeavoring to discharge the tremendous re- 
sponsibilities committed to its charge. It is especially 
aware of the unusual conditions in education brought on 
by the Great War; the scarcity of teachers, new ideas of 
education, new duties thrown upon the public schools of 
America; and in attempting to give some assistance to- 
ward the solution of these vital problems Fairmont Nor- 
mal feels that she is doing her largest service. 

The Normal has fitted itself into the public school sys- 
tem of the state and articulates perfectly with all other 
parts of the system. It gives graduates of four-year 
high schools entrance without examinations or conditions 
or stipulating what subjects they must have had; it sets 
up no arbitrary standards, it makes no attempt to in- 
fluence in this way the curriculum of the public schools. 
It has a special one-year course for those who wish to 
teach in villages or the country; it encourages specializa- 
tion in definite kinds of teaching; it provides special work 
in physical training, children's games, story-telling, music, 
drawing, agriculture, English, manual arts of various 
kinds — in fact, whenever it has been possible, the Normal 
has endeavored to prepare teachers in all the new subjects 
and for all the new duties as they have been made ap- 
parent. Whenever it is evident that a desirable change 
in the public school system has taken place or is about to 
take place, Fairmont Normal does its utmost to adjust 
its work, its ideals, its traditions, to this change. 

One of the ways in which Fairmont Normal is of a 
special service to the teaching profession is in its help- 
fulness to teachers already in service. There are always 
many teachers who cannot afford to attend school for an 
entire year at one time. Through its special spring and 
summer terms, and through its correspondence and ex- 
tension classes, the Normal School comes to the aid of 
such teachers, making it possible for them to continue 



18 Fairmont State Normal School 

their academic and professional studies. Each year teach- 
ers in service graduate from the Normal School, the ed- 
ucation obtained through experience in teaching being es- 
timated and counted toward graduation. 

IDEALS AND SPIRIT OF THE SCHOOL 

Every educational institution develops, in the course 
of years, a distinctive and characteristic "school spirit." 
It is this, rather than the buildings or equipment or the 
faculty, which most clearly distinguishes one school from 
another and gives each school almost a personal individ- 
uality. 

Fairmont Normal's school spirit is well-known; the 
unusual ideals and traditions of the school are almost im- 
mediately perceived by the new student or the visitor. 
The spirit is attractive and wholesome, and it accounts 
for the feeling of intense loyalty and devotion which 
students and graduates show for the school. 

Very prominent in Fairmont Normal is the richness 
and fineness of the social life of the students. For years 
it has been the tradition that Fairmont Normal students 
should engage in many diversified social activities, that 
Fairmont Normalites be acquainted with the best usages 
and trained in good breeding and the social arts. The 
authorities of the school believe that this is an important 
part of the education of any young man or woman, par- 
ticularly of anyone preparing to teach. Parties, recep- 
tions, teas, picnics, formal and informal gatherings of 
various sorts are therefore recognized and encouraged as 
an essential feature in the life of Fairmont Normal — all 
of these being subject to the direction and supervision of 
the Dean of Women and the Social Committee of the 
Faculty. 

Another noticeable quality of the life at Fairmont 
Normal is the student freedom that prevails. The Faculty 
governs by suggestion and advice rather than by rules 
and strict regulations, thus throwing the responsibility for 
conduct largely upon the students themselves. Visitors 
to the Normal School are always impressed by the lack 



Fairmont State Normal School 19 

of friction, by the absence of visible authority, by the fact 
that the school seems to "run itself." As a result of this 
liberality and freedom from imposed discipline, there have 
been few serious cases of misconduct or severe punish- 
ment at the Normal for several years. The authorities of 
the school believe that by thus giving the students more 
freedom of government and by placing more and more 
responsibility upon them as they show themselves worthy 
of it, they will be the better prepared for assuming the 
duties of teaching and the better prepared to accept re- 
sponsibility and to display initiative. 

A third feature of the school life at Fairmont Nor- 
mal is the excellent quality of the studentship. Hard, 
earnest, serious work is expected and exacted of the stu- 
dents. Those who are not willing to work diligently in the 
class room and in the many student activities and organ- 
izations, are not invited to attend Fairmont Normal. The 
life of the average student at this institution is a very 
busy one: that is one of the traditions of the school, it is 
a part of the school spirit. 

Finally, as Fairmont Normal is a teachers' school, the 
"atmosphere" is distinctly professional. "Teaching" is 
the subject most talked about throughout the school; the 
ambitions and hopes of every student center in teaching; 
it is the common goal of all. In consequence, there is a 
unanimity of purpose and effort, a singleness of aim that 
inspires all who attend the school and gives them zeal 
and enthusiasm for teaching. 

All this makes Fairmont State Normal School a most 
excellent place for living a full, rich, happy, busy life, 
for securing inspiration and preparation to enter upon one 
of life's most important vocations: teaching. 



20 Fairmont State Normal School 

HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL 

Provisions for the establishment of the Fairmont 
Normal School were made by the State Legislature of 
1867, and an appropriation was provided for the inaugu- 
ration of the work of the school. In the Act providing 
for the school, its purpose was declared to be that of ed- 
ucating and training teachers in the improved methods of 
instruction and discipline that would be of the best service 
to the common schools of the State. For more than fifty 
years the Normal School has striven to carry forward the 
purpose of its founders. Thousands of young men and 
women have been enrolled as students, and have felt the 
influence of the instruction which has been given, and 
thousands have been graduated and are engaged in the 
different vocations of the State, exerting wide influence in 
public affairs. From the beginning, the Normal School 
gave prominence to the idea of teacher training, with 
the result that the graduates of the school are very 
prominent in the educational work of the State. The 
men and women whose names have appeared in the list 
of faculties have been widely known for their ability and 
scholarship, and the instruction which has been given 
by them has been far reaching in its effects. 

In material and equipment, the Normal School has 
made steady advancement. In 1872 an appropriation was 
made by the State Legislature for the erection of a new 
building in conjunction with the local Board of Education. 
The building was completed and occupied in June, 1873. 
For many years, the building, standing at the corner of 
Main and Quincy streets, housed both the Normal School 
and the Public Schools of Fairmont. It has been entirely 
abandoned for school use. In the year 1893 the Normal 
School was moved into a new building on Fairmont Ave- 
nue, between Second and Third streets. Several years 
ago the State authorities recognized the need of the in- 
stitution for a larger site, with more room for buildings. 
The Board of Control, therefore, was authorized by the 
State Legislature to purchase new grounds at the far end 
of Locust Avenue, on the west side of Fairmont. The new 



Fairmont State Normal School 21 

site consists of eighteen and one-half acres of ground 
ideally located for the institution. In January, 1917, the 
Normal School was moved into the magnificent new build- 
ing, which is to be its home in the future. Since that 
time a temorary gymnasium and a beautiful girls' dor- 
mitory have been constructed. 

The curriculum has steadily been enlarged and im- 
proved to keep pace with the needs of the times. For 
many years the curriculum was parallel to that of a high 
school. About 1912 a year's work was added, making it 
necessary for graduates of a standard high school to 
spend one year in the Normal. About 1915 another year's 
work was added, bringing the school up to standard nor- 
mal work. In 1920 the high school, or academic depart- 
ment was discontinued. The last step was taken in 1923. 
At this time the Normal School was granted permission 
to offer a four-year college course and to grant the A. B. 
degree in Education. The first college degrees, six in 
number, were granted in 1924; in 1925 twenty-two de- 
grees were granted. 

LOCATION 

The Fairmont State Normal School is located at Fair- 
mont, West Virginia, on the Monongahela River, near the 
junction of the Tygarts Valley and West Fork Rivers. 
It is on the main line of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, 
and at the terminus of the Monongahela Railroad. It 
may be reached on the Monongahela Valley Traction 
Company interurban lines from Weston, Bridgeport, 
Clarksburg, Mannington, and Fairview, and by bus from 
Morgantown. It is the geographical center of one of the 
most populous sections of the state. Clarksburg, Grafton, 
Elkins, Mannington, Moundsville, Wheeling, Parkersburg 
and other important towns and cities are within a short 
distance; Fairmont is one of the most accessible cities of 
the State. 

Fairmont is a busy, modern, progressive city of about 
25,000 population, with a commission form of government, 
electric lighting, pure water supply — all the advantages* 



22 Fairmont State Normal School 

and conveniences of a modern urban community. It has 
many fine churches of different denominations, and it has 
one of the best public school systems in the country. Its 
population is composed of an enterprising and wide-awake 
class of people. Its citizens take an active interest in 
education and all movements for the advancement of the 
community and state. Many of America's famous 
public men and women and most noted speakers have been 
brought to Fairmont by some of the city's clubs and so- 
cieties. For these reasons, it is an especially favorable 
location for an educational institution. 

BUILDINGS AND CAMPUS 

The main building is a fine example of classic archi- 
tecture, and is one of the finest public buildings that has 
been erected by the State. With its architectural beauty 
it combines a practical arrangement and equipment for 
school work. It stands in the center of the spacious new 
campus and commands a beautiful view of the surround- 
ing country. The building is 265 feet long, 65 feet wide, 
and three stories in height. The outside walls are made 
of light brick trimmed with limestone and terra cotta. 
Beautiful steps and approaches have been completed. It 
contains a fine auditorium, large library, study halls, 
society rooms, rooms for domestic science and domestic 
art, biological laboratories, chemical and physical labora- 
tories, science lecture rooms, music rooms, offices, lunch 
rooms and general recitation rooms. Although very large, 
the building has already been outgrown by the rapidly 
enlarging student body. The legislature of 1923, recogniz- 
ing this, appropriated $60,000 to build a wing, which will 
contain library, reading room, a cafeteria, offices, and 
additional class rooms. This will be ready for occupancy 
in the fall of 1925. 

The woman's hall, which was finished in 1922, is of 
the same architecture and material as the main building. 
It is situated in the rear and at right angles to the main 
building, with a beautiful view in all directions over the 
hills. The hall has accommodations for seventy-five young 



Fairmont State Normal School 23 

ladies, besides liberal provision for parlors, dining room 
and suites for the matron. The woman's hall is in charge 
of a mature woman of experience and special training, so 
that the occupants will be as well cared for as they would 
be in their own home. All in all, the woman's hall is 
one of the finest dormitories in West Virginia. 

A temporary wooden gymnasium has been construct- 
ed on the campus and is in constant use by students of the 
Normal School, and other schools in this community. It 
has one of the best basketball floors in the State. The 
Monongahela Valley Basketball Tournament is held here 
annually, and is one of the important events of the ath- 
letic year. The gymnasium provides splendid opportuni- 
ties for the training of students in all indoor games and 
sports. It is the laboratory of the department of physical 
education. 

The campus is rapidly becoming one of the most beau- 
tiful and picturesque grounds in the State. Several acres 
have been laid out in gardens, trees and shrubbery are 
being planted, walks and roads laid, and other improve- 
ments made. 

The legislature of 1925 appropriated money to pur- 
chase twenty-six additional acres of land adjoining the 
present campus, to be used as an athletic field. This will 
be ready for use in 1926. 

TRAINING SCHOOLS 

Arrangements have been made with the Board of Ed- 
ucation of Fairmont Independent District by which the 
Butcher School, located on Fourth street, is open to the 
regular Normal School Seniors for observation and prac- 
tice teaching. 

Arrangements have been made also for training facil- 
ities in the elementary schools at Jayenne and Barrack- 
ville and in the high school at Barrackville and East Side, 
Fairmont. All students of the Normal School have 
abundant opportunity to observe excellent teaching and to 
practice teaching, under competent critic teachers. All 
training work is under the direction of the Education 
department of the Normal School. 



24 Fairmont State Normal School 

LIBRARY 

Fairmont Normal has a library of more than eight 
thousand volumes, in charge of a competent librarian 
and assistants. The books have been selected with care, 
with the special view of getting together the best books 
in the different fields of knowledge and literature and 
specifically in the field of Education. Virtually all the 
authoritative books on Education, all the classics in Eng- 
lish and American Literature, and all well-known refer- 
ence books are to be found in the library. Modern fiction, 
drama, and poetry are well represented. 

In the library are to be found more than one hundred 
of the most useful and popular newspapers and maga- 
zines, both educational and general. Students are allowed 
free access to these periodicals, and each week the librar- 
ian posts on the library bulletin lists of stories and arti- 
cles most worth reading, so that the student may be as- 
sisted in finding what he wants to read. The library owns 
a large number of bound volumes of periodicals of recent 
years. 

EXPENSES 

It is the aim of the Normal School authorities to keep 
the expenses for students as low as is consistent with 
their being well provided for. Fairmont is not an inex- 
pensive place to live, but the new woman's hall will allow 
of students being cared for at very reasonable cost. It 
is estimated that a year's schooling at Fairmont Normal 
costs about as follows: 

Board and Room $300.00 

Tuition and class expense 20.00 

Laundry 30.00 

Books and stationery 15.00 

Miscellaneous 35.00 



Total $400.00 

(Rooms at Morrow Hall range from $1.75 to $2.25 a 
week. Table board is $5.00 a week.) 



Fairmont State Normal School 25 

This summary is estimated on the needs of the aver- 
age student. Some students will spend considerably more 
than this, and some will be able to attend school for 
slightly less. 

No one who desires to attend school at Fairmont Nor- 
mal should become discouraged because he is not provided 
with sufficient money to pay all his expenses. There is 
abundance of work of various kinds for young men and 
women, in and about Fairmont, and any ambitious and 
energetic student can make his own way while attending 
school. A faculty committee assists students to secure 
employment. 

A good many young women students secure room for 
light housekeeping, and reduce the cost of living mater- 
ially, especially if they can have some provisions sent them 
from home. 

ORGANIZATIONS AND STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

Student organizations and activities carried on by 
students have a distinct and notable place in the school. 
Recognizing that they encourage initiative and self- 
control, provide laboratory training in English, teach par- 
liamentary law, and train in appearing before the public, 
and realizing that this is of special value for teachers, 
the authorities manifest keen interest in the conduct and 
success of the established organizations and the formation 
of new ones. Every student can find some kind of student 
work that fits in with his interest and talents. 

STUDENT BODY 

The entire school is organized into an association 
known as the Student Body which meets regularly once a 
month and also at the call of the president. It fills an im- 
portant place in the general work of the Normal School. 
Through this organization, receptions are arranged, offi- 
cers of the "Columns" and "Pamphlet" elected, special 
committees appointed, the lecture course directed, and 
many other services as they arise from time to time ren- 
dered. A Student Body fee of $2.50 a year is required, of 



26 Fairmont State Normal School 

all students. This covers the cost of receptions, flowers, 
and additional expenses for the student body. It also 
entitles the student to a ticket for all numbers in the reg- 
ular lecture course. The constitution of the Student Body- 
is printed in the Fairmont Normal Hand-book. 

SOCIAL CABINET 

The president of the Student Body and the presidents 
of all the school organizations, together with a faculty 
representative, constitute what is known as the Social 
Cabinet. This is the advisory board of the Student Body. 
Through it many wholesome movements are launched and 
projects initiated. 

CLASS ORGANIZATIONS 

At the beginning of the school year each academic 
class forms an organization by electing officers and ap- 
pointing committees. The classes give parties, engage in 
athletic contests, and act as units in all the activities of 
the school. A member of the faculty serves as class ad- 
viser to each class. 

WRITERS' CLUBS 

Students who are interested in writing have an op- 
portunity to carry on literary work through the Writers' 
Club. This organization publishes The Colums, a fort- 
nightly news magazine, and The Pamphlet, a pictorial 
year-book. The Columns is a member of the West Virginia 
Intercollegiate Press Association. Work on The Columns 
may be credited on English 46. 

THE MASQUERS 

"The Masquers" is the name of the organization of 
students interested in dramatic work. It is one of the 
most efficient and popular clubs in the Normal School. 
During the year 1924-25 ten plays were given among 
which were productions by Arlo Bates, Constance D'Arcy 
Mackay, W. W. Jacobs, Mary Mapes Dodge, Van Tassel 



Fairmont State Normal School 27 

Sutphen, Arnold Bennett, George Middleton, and Booth 
Tarkington. Some of these ranked unusually high as 
amateur productions. Work in this club may be credited 
on English 46. 

ORATORICAL SOCIETY 

Those who desire to develop ability as public speakers 
have abundant opportunities through the activities of the 
Oratorical Society. Both debating and orating are carried 
on. This club is a charter member of the West Virginia 
Inter-collegiate Forensic Association. Debates were held 
during the past year with Shepherd College and New 
River State School. Work in this organization may be 
credited on English 46. 

CHEMISTRY SOCIETY 

A chemistry society, the Lamda Delta Lamda, has 
just been organized. The purpose of this organization 
is to promote interest in the study of chemistry and 
physics. The membership is limited to young men who 
have had at least sixteen hours of chemistry. Mr. Rogers 
is honorary president. 

GLEE CLUBS 

Fairmont State Normal has two Glee Clubs: one for 
the young men and one for the young women. These are 
voluntary organizations. All students having musical 
ability belong to one or the other of these organizations, 
and meet once a week throughout the year for practice 
and rehearsals. At times during the year the two organ- 
izations combine to give a joint public program. The 
instructor of vocal music in the Normal School is director 
of these clubs. Credit for glee club work may be secured, 
as Music 3. 

CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS 

Fairmont Normal has active chapters of both the 
Young Men's Christian Association and the Young 
Women's Christian Association. The latter is especially 



28 Fairmont State Normal School 

large and influential. These organizations have monthly 
program meetings and carry on throughout the year a 
number of charitable and religious activities. The Young 
Men's Christian Association publishes the student hand- 
book. Representatives of the Association are sent each 
year to the national meetings. 

WOMEN'S SOCIAL CLUBS 

The young women living in Morrow Hall have formed 
a "house" organization, with officers and committees, to 
carry on the social affairs of the Hall. The young women 
students living in Fairmont have an organization known 
as the "0. I. T." (Out in Town) club, which attempts to 
secure cooperation and consolidation among these stu- 
dents. 

LECTURE COURSE 

The Lecture Course, which is under the direction of 
the Student Body and the faculty committee, is one of the 
most notable features of Normal School life. Each year 
a number of programs, consisting of lectures, concerts, 
plays and various kinds of entertainment, are given in 
the school auditorium. 

HIKERS' CLUB 

The young women of the school have organized a 
Hikers' Club which is active especially in the fall and 
spring months. The purpose of this club is to take hikes 
out from Fairmont through the country and nearby towns. 
Any girl student in school may join this club. Miss 
Strieby, director of physical education, is leader. 

ATHLETICS 

Fairmont Normal engages in most of the major 
branches of organized interscholastic athletics: football, 
basketball, track, and tennis, and, with the completion of 
the new athletic field, baseball will be added. It is the 
policy of the institution to provide equipment and appa- 



Fairmont State Normal School 29 

ratus and to encourage athletic sports within moderation. 
No effort has been made or will be made to bring the ath- 
letic activities to a higher level than that attained by 
other activities of the school. Coaches and physical direc- 
tors are employed, a well balanced schedule is made each 
season, and the students support the teams loyally and 
enthusiastically: that is all that can reasonably be ex- 
pected. 

One of the pleasant features of the athletic life in 
Fairmont Normal is the popularity of inter-class games. 
The different classes have their teams, play a regular 
schedule of games and hold inter-class contests. The 
young women's basketball teams representing the various 
classes hold a tournament once a year, the winning team 
being given a loving cup. 

As an illustration of the nature of the athletic activ- 
ity of Fairmont, the football schedule for 1925 is given: 

Sept. 25 — Salem College at Salem. 

Oct. 2 — Potomac State at Grafton. 

Oct. 9 — West Liberty at Fairmont. 

Oct. 16 — California Normal at Fairmont. 

Nov. 6 — Glenville Normal at Fairmont. 

Nov. 13 — W. V. U. Freshmen at Fairmont. 

Nov. 21 — Blue Ridge College at Fairmont. 



30 Fairmont State Normal School 

COURSES OF STUDY 

Fairmont State Normal School is now a teachers' 
college. A full four-year college course, leading to the 
degree of Bachelor of Arts in Education, and a two-year 
course, leading to a diploma, are offered. 

The institution has two courses of study: the College 
course, and the Standard (two-year) Normal course. 

Before studying the different courses the student 
should learn the following definition: 

An hour, usually called "semester hour," is the credit 
received for taking a subject one recitation period a week 
for eighteen weeks. Thus, taking a subject three times 
per week for eighteen weeks would give the student three 
semester hours' credit. It will be seen that a student 
taking four subjects four times a week for two semesters 
should receive 32 "semester hours" credit. This is the 
amount of credit usually earned in a year. Two class 
periods in laboratory work are equivalent to one recitation 
period in a subject requiring preparation for the recita- 
tion. This rule of measurement applies also to subjects 
not requiring preparation, such as physical training, 
music, and drawing. 

COLLEGE COURSE 

PURPOSE : This course is designed to prepare teach- 
ers for Junior and Senior High Schools and supervisory 
positions. 

ENTRANCE: "The present requirements for gradu- 
ation as fixed by the West Virginia High School course 
of study will be recognized for college entrance to West 
Virginia Normal Schools and Colleges." But "Students 
will be admitted to the State Normal Schools and Colleges 
on presentation of 15 units of High School credit, the 
remaining unit to be made up during the first or second 
year of Normal School or College work." 

LENGTH: The course consists of four full years of 
work above a four-year high school course. One hundred 
twenty-eight semester hours are required for graduation. 



Fairmont State Normal School 31 

RESIDENCE: Thirty-two hours must be done in res- 
idence at the Normal School, sixteen hours of which must 
be done during the senior year. 

RATE AT WHICH CREDIT MAY BE EARNED: 

The regular amount of work for each year of this course 
is 32 semester hours. In the first two years of the course 
the student may, by permission of his class adviser, carry 
36 semester hours a year. In the last two years of the 
course the student may by permission of his class adviser, 
carry 34 semester hours a year. Only superior students 
are given permission to carry more than 32 hours. 

ADVANCED CREDIT: "Work done in any state 
normal school, college, or university of the state, shall be 
credited, hour for hour, by any other Normal School, 
College or University of the state, subject to residence, 
graduation, and special requirements on account of mem- 
bership in any approved association of colleges or univer- 
sities." Students and graduates in the Normal Courses, 
either in this institution or elsewhere, will receive credit 
hour for hour for work done in these courses. Thus, a 
graduate of the Standard Normal course, who has earned 
64 semester hours, would receive credit for 64 hours on 
the College course, leaving 64 hours additional work to 
complete. 

CERTIFICATE GRANTED: Graduates of the col- 
lege course receive a certificate from the State of West 
Virginia, which certificate enables them to act as principal 
or supervisor or to teach in any high school or elementary 
school in the state, and which is accepted by other states 
as the equivalent of the high school certificate in those 
states. 

RECOGNITION OF COURSE: Fairmont Normal 
has "Class A" standing in the American Association of 
Teachers Colleges and in the Southern Association of 
Teacher-Training Institutions. Graduates of the College 
course have already been given unconditional entrance to 
the graduate schools of such institutions as the George 
Peabody College for Teachers. 



Fairmont State Normal School 



STANDARD NORMAL COURSES 

PURPOSE: These courses are designed to prepare 
teachers for positions in the elementary schools of the 
towns and cities of West Virginia. Graduates of these 
courses are recommended for positions in the elementary 
schools of the state. 

ENTRANCE: The same requirements as for those 
entering the college course. (See page 30.) 

LENGTH : These courses represent two full years of 
work above a four-year high school course; 64 semester 
hours are required for graduation. 

RESIDENCE: 32 hours of the 64 hours must done 
in Fairmont Normal. At least 24 of the 32 hours must 
be done in residence; the remaining 8 hours may be done 
through correspondence or extension work from Fairmont 
Normal. 

RATE AT WHICH CREDIT MAY BE EARNED: 
The regular amount of work for each year of these courses 
is 32 semester hours. Exceptional students may be given 
permission by their class advisers to carry a maximum 
of 36 semester hours. 

ADVANCED CREDIT: Credit in the Normal Courses 
is allowed, hour for hour, for work done in any institution 
of recognized standing beyond high school rank, or for 
work done as fifth year work in those high schools 
approved by the State Department of Education as cap- 
able of giving fifth year work. 

CERTIFICATE GRANTED: Graduates of these 
courses receive a certificate from the State of West Vir- 
ginia, good for five years, and renewable almost indefin- 
itely, so that it is practically a certificate for life. This 
enables the graduates to teach in any school in West 
Virginia, and it is usually accepted by other states as 
equivalent to the highest elementary certificate in those 
states. 



Fairmont State Normal School 33 

SALARY: Graduates of Standard Normal Courses 
cannot receive, under the law of West Virginia, a salary 
of less than $100.00 a month. This is the basic salary for 
the first term of teaching. Most graduates of Fairmont 
Normal start in with a salary of from $110.00 to $140.00 
a month. 

THE '1SHGRT COURSE" CERTIFICATE 

Fairmont Normal has offered for some years a one- 
year course, called the "Short Course." Beginning with 
the school year 1924-25 this course was discontinued. But 
the school continues to grant the so-called "Short Course 
Equivalent" certificate, to all those who finish the first 
year of the Standard Course and who find it necessary 
or desirable to teach for a time before completing the 
Standard Course. This certificate enables its holder to 
teach in any elementary school of the state, at a salary 
of not less than $90.00 a month. 

REGULATIONS OF THE STATE BOARD OF 
EDUCATION 

The West Virginia Board of Education has passed 
certain regulations concerning credits, certificates, etc., 
some of which regulations are printed below. They apply 
to Fairmont Normal beginning with the school year 1924- 
25. 

I. No advance) credit for work of high school grade: 

Work done in high school or other institutions before 
the completion of a standard four-year high school course 
shall not be credited for advanced credit in the State 
Normal Schools and Colleges, except by order of the State 
Board of Education. 

II. Limits on credit for professional work : 

The minimum and maximum of professional work in 
the courses listed below shall be as indicated: 

(a) In the College Course for Teachers 20 hrs. 36 hrs. 

(b) The Standard Normal Course 24 " 32 " 

(c) In the Short Normal Course 18 " 20 " 



34 Fairmont State Normal School 

III. Credit for teaching experience: 

1. Credit for teaching experience is recommended 
for persons who are taking courses in preparation for 
teaching, and is to be allowed at the discretion of the 
officials of institutions, under conditions indicated below: 

2. The student must submit satisfactory evidence of 
successful teaching experience. 

3. The student must do at least one term of work in 
residence before credit for experience is approved and 
entered on the records of the institution. (Credit for 
experience may be refused a student whose residence work 
is unsatisfactory.) 

4. Credit for experience must be recorded as such 
and substituted for elective courses, and must not be sub- 
stituted for required subjects. 

5. Credit for teaching experience in any year may be 
allowed as high school credit or as college credit, but in 
no case shall credit be allowed more than once for the 
same year of teaching. 

6. The following is the maximum amount of credit 
that may be given for teaching experience: 

(a) First year of experience, no credit. 

(b) For second, third, fourth, fifth and sixth years, 
one-half unit of high school credit, or two semester hours 
of college credit for each year in which the student taught 
a full term of school. 

IV. Credit on a teacher's certificate: 

1. On an elementary certificate earned in the Uni- 
form Examination, one-half unit of high school credit 
may be allowed on each of the following subjects in which 
the applicant has received a grade of 85 per cent or more : 
Eeading, English Grammar, Arithmetic, Physiology, 
United States History, Geography, Agriculture, Civil 
Government, Theory and Art of Teaching, State History, 
Bookkeeping, Ancient History. 



Fairmont State Normal School 35 

2. Credit for a subject on a teacher's certificate can- 
not be allowed if the student has already received credit 
for identical or similar work. 

3. Credit given on Reading and English Grammar on 
account of a teachers' certificate can be substituted only 
for first year high school English. 

V. Credit on Reading Circle Rooks: 

1. A person who has made a grade of 85 per cent on 
any approved subjects of the Reading Circle Course by 
state examination may receive credit as follows: 

(a) On a high school course, one-fourth unit in each 
subject. 

(b) On a normal school course, two semester hours 

on each subject. 

VI. Extension Classes: 

1. In Extension Classes conducted by members of the 
faculty of the institution, the conditions and standards of 
work should be as far as possible, the same as required 
in resident classes. 

2. A State Institution may recognize extension 
classes taught by persons not on the regular faculty under 
the following general conditions: 

(a) The instructor must hold the degree of Master 
of Arts or have equivalent training in the subjects taught. 

(b) He must be approved by the head of the insti- 
tution's department in v/hich the work is to be credited. 

(c) A person regularly engaged in school work may 
conduct not more than one two-hour course a semester. 

(d) The student must be on the same scholastic level 
as are students doing similar work in the institution. 

3. Credit for work in extension classes shall be given 
on the general basis of 18 recitation hours for one semes- 
ter hour of credit. 

VII. Correspondence work: 

1. Credit for correspondence courses shall be given 



36 Fairmont State Normal School 

on the general basis of 54 hours of study for 1 semester 
hour of credit, and the final examination shall be given 
by the person designated by the institution offering the 
course. 

2. The total amount of correspondence work that 
may be accredited on any course shall be as follows : 

(a) The standard college course, 20 hours. 

(b) The standard normal course, 12 hours. 

(c) Short normal course, 8 hours. 

VIII. Credit for Extension work limited: 

1. The total amount of extension work (including 
correspondence work) that may be done during one term 
of teaching shall not be more than 8 hours, not more than 
6 of which may be in correspondence work. 

IX. Temporary and equivalent certificates: 

*1. Beginning with 1925 the requirement for tem- 
porary certificate shall be 9 weeks of work in residence 
and at least 8 hours of credit in addition to high school 
graduation. 

2. The short normal equivalent certificate may be 
issued to any one who obtains credit for the first year of 
the standard normal course as outlined in the catalogue. 

3. Any person who has completed the work required 
for, or equivalent to that of any course on which is issued 
a teacher's certificate, but who has not met the residence 
or other graduation requirements for a diploma may have 
his work approved by the State Board of Education and 
the corresponding certificate may be issued without for- 
mal graduation. The school work of such person will be 
approved only when the applicant meets the following 
conditions : 

(a) The applicant must make application on the form 



*The State Department of Education is considering 
making a change in the temporary certificate given for 
1925-26, granting high school graduates with 8 hours' ad- 
vanced work only a second grade temporary certificate. 



Fairmont State Normal School 37 

approved by the State Department of Education, 
giving a definite statement of the information re- 
quested. (Apply for Teacher-Training Form 14.) 

(b) All school work done must be evaluated and ap- 
proved by the faculty or accrediting committee of 
a West Virginia School or College authorized to give 
the course for which such work is being approved. 

(c) The applicant must be recommended by the city or 
district and county superintendent under whom he 
has had his most recent teaching experience. 

CONTENTS OF THE COLLEGE COURSE 

The College course is not organized and outlined by 
the semester-schedule plan, but by major subjects, minors, 
groups, and electives. Courses are to be taken, whenever 
possible, in the order of their numerical designation; cer- 
tain courses may be taken only in the junior and senior 
years; certain other courses may not be entered upon 
until certain pre-requisite courses have been finished. 

To graduate from the College a student must see that 
his work conforms to the following requirements : 

1. A total of 128 semester hours. 

2. Required of all students: 38 hours. 

1. In Education 24. 

2. In Physical Education 8. 

3. In English 6. 

3. Major — 24 hours. 
Minor — 16 hours. 

4. Electives 50 hours. 

These elective hours must be distributed among at 
least four additional departments or groups, with not 
fewer than 8 hours in each group. 

The major and minor subjects shall be chosen not 
later than the beginning of the sophomore year. The stu- 
dent should select as his major the subject that he desires 
to teach. The minor should be chosen from a related 



38 Fairmont State Normal School 

field, or should be the second subject that the student 
would elect to teach, if he should be called upon to teach 
two subjects. 

At least 12 hours of the 24 hours offered as the major 
and at least 45 of the 128 hours required for graduation 
must be earned in courses scheduled for the junior and 
senior years (courses numbered from "20" upward.) 

In 1925-26 the majors and minors may be chosen from 
the following departments or groups : 

1. Education. 

2. English. 

3. History. 

4. Chemistry. 

5. Biology (agriculture, botany, and nature study). 

6. Mathematics. 

7. Home Economics (domestic art and domestic 
science). 

8. Fine Arts (drawing and music). 

9. Sociology. 

If education is elected as a major 30 hours are pre- 
scribed, 6 hours in addition to the general prescription of 
24 hours. 

Minors may be chosen from any of the major subjects 
except Education and also from: 

1. Geography. 

2. Physical Education (including physiology and hy- 
giene). 

3. French. 

Graduates of the Normal Course may complete the 
college course by doing 64 hours in addition to the 64 
hours required in the normal course. The 64 additional 
hours, however, must be distributed so as to meet the gen- 
eral requirements for graduation in the college with re- 
spect to majors and minors, and the distribution among 
four additional departments, and must include 12 hours 
additional work in education. 

Work taken in the second year of the Normal Course 



Fairmont State Normal School 39 

may be counted on the major and minor subjects. Work 
taken in the first year may be counted on the 56 elective 
hours. 

The plan of the college course may readily be under- 
stood by the outline on page 41. Each student working 
for a degree should obtain a copy of this outline from 
his class adviser and, with his aid, work, from semester 
to semester, to secure a well-rounded and symmetrical 






40 



Fairmont State Normal School 



OUTLINE OF COURSES LEADING TO AN A. 

Name Address 



B. 



Education 

Education 1 
Education 20 
Education 21 



Hrs. 

... 24 



I 

I Education 22 

| 

I Education 24 

I 

I Electives in Ed. 



English 

* English 1 
♦English 2 



I ^English 41 



Physical Education 



(Men) 

Physical Education 1 

Physical Education 5 

Physical Education 7 

Physical Education 25 



(Women) 
I Phys. Education 1 3 
I 

I Phys. Ed. 3-4 | 2 

f 

I Phys. Ed. 23 1 

I 
I Phys. Ed. 24 2 









?A 
















Minor 






Ifi 
















Distributed Eleotives : 
1 


Four Grou 

1 


ps 32 

13 III 

1 III 


2 


1 1 

1 1 


14 III 

1 1 1 


Free Electives 






18 


1 1 





Total 128 

♦Requirement may be waived if the student can pass a satisfactory 



examination in English. 



Fairmont State Normal School 41 

CONTENTS OF THE STANDARD NORMAL COURSE 

Students entering the Standard Normal course have 
a choice of any one of three differentiated curricula: 
primary, intermediate, and junior high. The differentia- 
tion does not begin, however, until the second semester of 
the junior year, in order that students may have an op- 
portunity, during the first semester, of deciding what 
work they wish to take. Certain subjects (called "con- 
stants," and marked with a star) are found in all the 
Standard Normal courses. The electives are chosen from 
the list of subjects outlined in this catalog, but must be 
approved by the class adviser. 

The requirements in English 1 and 2 and Mathe- 
matics 1 will be waived upon satisfactory entrance exam- 
ination. These examinations will be held a day or two 
after the opening of each term. 

PROGRAM OF STUDIES 
Primary Curriculum 

Junior Year 

♦Education 1. Introduction to Teaching 2 hours 

*Education 2. Educational Psychology 4 

♦Physical Education 1. Physiology and Hygiene 3 

♦Sociology 1. Social Relations 1 

♦English 1 2 

♦English 2 2 

Education 3. Supervised Study 4 

Physical Education 3. Teachers Physical 

Education 2 

Art 5. Drawing Methods 2 

Electives 10 

Total 32 



42 Fairmont State Normal School 

Senior Year 

♦Education 8. Tests and Measurements 2 hours 

Education 4. Primary Methods 4 

* Education 6. School Management and School 

Hygiene 4 

♦Education 9. Observation and Teaching 5 

English 4. Children's Literature 2 

Music 2. Music Methods 2 

Biology 1 or 2. Nature Study 2 

English 2. Story Telling 2 

Electives 8 

Total 32 

Intermediate Curriculum 

Junior Year 

♦Education 1. Introduction to Teaching 2 hours 

♦Education 2. Educational Psychology 4 

♦Physical Education 1. Physiology and Hygiene 3 

♦Sociology 1. Social Relations 1 

♦English 1 2 

♦English 2 2 

Mathematics 1 2 

Education 3. Supervised Study 4 

Art 5. Drawing Methods 2 

Physical Education 3. Teachers' Physical 

Education 2 

Electives 7 

Total 32 

Senior Year 
♦Education 6. School Management and School 

Hygiene 4 hours 

♦Education 9. Observation and Teaching 5 

♦Education 8. Tests and Measurements 2 

Education 5. Intermediate Methods 4 

English 4. Children's Literature 2 

Music 4. Music Methods 2 

Biology 1 or 2. Nature Study 2 

Electives 11 

Total 32 



Fairmont State Normal School 43 

Junior High School Curriculum 

Junior Year 

* Education 1. Introduction to Teaching 2 hours 

♦Education 2. Educational Psychology 4 

♦Physical Education 1. Physiology and Hygiene 3 

♦Sociology 1. Social Relations 1 

♦English 1 2 

♦English 2 2 

Mathematics 1 2 

Physical Education 4. Teachers'Physical 

Education 2 

fElectives „ 14 

Total 32 

Senior Year 

* ♦Education 6. School Management and School 

Hygiene 4 hours 

♦Education 9. Observation and Teaching 5 

^♦Education 8. Tests and Measurements 2 

/-Education 7. The Junior High School 2 

<*CEducation 20. Methods of Teaching in Secondary 

Schools 4 

fElectives 13 

Total 32 



f The electives should be selected, with the approval 
of the class adviser, from the subjects which the student 
expects to teach in the junior high school. 



44 Fairmont State Normal School 

DESCRIPTIVE OUTLINE OF COURSES 

Unless otherwise stated, the credit value of the course 
is identical with the number of hours per week that the 
class meets. 

Courses from one to nineteen are considered to be 
Junior and Senior Normal level or Freshman and Soph- 
omore College level. Courses from twenty on are consid- 
ered to be Junior and Senior College level. 

The following outline does not attempt to list the 
spring and summer school courses, except in those in- 
stances where "Sp" or "S" is placed after the numerical 
designation of the course. The spring and summer school 
courses are all, with infrequent exceptions, chosen from 
the regular courses. 

"A" indicates a course offered in the first semester, 
"B" indicates a course offered in the second semester. 
The abbreviations "M", "T", "W", "Th", "F", indicate 
the days on which the class meets. The figures "8:15", 
"9:10", etc. indicate the hours at which the class begins. 
The schedule, therefore, is definitely made for 1925-26, 
and will not be changed except for very strong reasons. 

EDUCATION 

Mr. Shreve Mr. White Miss Gibson Miss Leonard 
Miss Hull 

Education 1 — Introduction to Teaching. 

Two hours, first semester. First section, 11:00, M, 
Th; second section, 1:00 M, W; third section, 1:55 M, 
W; fourth section, 1:55 T, Th. Required in all the 
curricula. The aim of this course is to acquaint the 
student with the general field of education and thus 
provide a basis for the wise selection of the type of 
educational service for which he desires to prepare 
himself. Each student is confronted with the prac- 
tical problem of choosing the curriculum which he 
will pursue throughout the remainder of his life in 
the school. — Mr. White and additional instructor. 



Fairmont State Normal School 45 

Education 2A — Elementary Educational Psychology. 

Four hours, first semester. First section, 8:15 T, 
W, Th, F; second section, 10:05 M, T, W, F; third 
section, 11:00, M, T, Th, F. Required in all the Nor- 
mal curricula. In this course the student is intro- 
duced to the principles of learning and teaching 
through reading, class discussions, and experiments. 
Some attention will be given to the native equipment 
of the pupil, to individual differences, physical tests, 
and to grading and the distribution of marks.— Mr. 
Shreve and additional instructor. 

Education 2B — Elementary Educational Psychology. 

Four hours, second semester. First section, 10:05 M, 
T, W, F; second section, 11:00, M, T, Th, F; third 
section, 1:00, M, T, W, Th. A repetition of 2 A.— 
Mr. Shreve. 

Education 3 — Supervised Study. 

Four hours, second semester. 8:15, T, W, Th, F. Re- 
quired in the primary and intermediate curricula. 
This course is organized around a few main topics: 
the meaning of supervised study, types of classroom 
activities, the essential factors of each type of exer- 
cise, how to supervise each type. A minimum of one 
hour a week of observation in the training school is 
required in this course. Miss Gibson, Miss Leonard, 
and additional instructor. 

Education 4 — Primary Methods. 

Four hours, first semester. 8:15, T, W, Th, F. Re- 
quired in the primary curriculum. This course is de- 
voted to a consideration of methods of teaching in the 
primary grades. How to teach reading, arithmetic, 
spelling, handwriting, and other subjects will be con- 
sidered, as time permits. — Miss Gibson. 



46 Fairmont State Normal School 

Education 5— Intermediate Methods. 

Four hours, first semester. 8:15, T, W, Th, F. Re- 
quired in the intermediate curriculum. The aim of 
this course is to prepare for effective teaching in the 
intermediate grades. The following subjects will be 
considered: reading, history, geography, arithmetic, 
and language. — Miss Leonard. 

Education 6A — School Management and School Hygiene. 

Four hours, first semester. First section, 9:10, M, T, 
W, F; second section, 10:05, M, T, W, F. Required 
in all the Normal curricula. This course deals pri- 
marily with the problems of classroom management, 
but some attention is given to the more general prob- 
lems of administration and supervision. About one- 
fourth of the time will be devoted to school hygiene. 
— Mr. White. 

Education 6B — (School Management and School Hygiene. 

Four hours, second semester. First section, 9:10, M, 
T, W, F; second section, 10:05, M, T, W, F. A repe- 
tition of 6A. — Mr. White. 

Education 7 — The Junior High School. 

Two hours, second semester. 2:50, M, W. Required 
in the junior high school curriculum. This course 
deals with the aims and functions of the junior high 
school. — Miss Hull. 

Education 8A — Tests and Measurements in the Elemen- 
tary School. 

Two hours, first semester. First section, 1:00, T, Th; 
second section, 1:55, T, Th. Required in all the Nor- 
mal curricula. The aim of this course is to introduce 
the student to the recent developments in the field of 
scientific measurements, and to develop the ability to 
utilize the standard tests as a means of improving 
instruction. — Mr. White. 



Fairmont State Normal School 47 

Education 8B — Tests and Measurements in the Elemen- 
tary School. 

Two hours, second semester. First section, 1:00, M, 
W; second section, 1:55, M, W. A repetition of 8 A. 
— Mr. White. 

Education 9A — Observation and Teaching. 

Five hours, first semester . Hours to be arranged. (It 
requires a double period for the course in Education 
9.) Required in all the Normal curricula. This 
course consists of observation and practice teaching 
in the training school under the supervision of a 
training teacher. A minimum of ninety clock hours 
of observation and teaching is required of each stu- 
dent. The student must do at least sixty hours of 
actual teaching. — Miss Gibson, Miss Hull, Miss 
Leonard. 

Education 9B — Observation and Teaching. 

Five hours, second semester. Hours to be arranged. 
This course is the same as 9A. One-half the seniors 
will enroll for 9A the first semester and the other half 
for 9B the second semester. — Miss Gibson, Miss 
Hull, Miss Leonard. 

Education 20 — Methods of Teaching in Secondary Schools. 

Four hours, first semester. First section, 8:15, T, 
W, Th, F; second section, 2:50, M, T, W, Th. Re- 
quired in the junior high school and in the college 
curricula. The first section is designed for those 
preparing to teach in junior high school; the second 
section for those preparing to teach in senior high 
school. The aim of this course is to prepare the stu- 
dent for effective teaching in the secondary school. 
The point of view is that of directing the learning 
activities of pupils. A minimum of one hour a week 
of observation in the training school will be required 
in connection with this course. — Miss Hull and addi- 
tional instructor. 



48 Fairmont State Normal School 

Education 21 — Advanced Educational Psychology. 

Four hours, second semester. 8:15 T, W, Th, F. Re- 
quired of all college students in the junior or senior 
year. This course is organized around a series of 
problems. Each student will investigate the problems 
assigned and repart his findings for the class discus- 
sion and evaluation. — Mr. Shreve. 

Education 22 — The Principles of Secondary Education. 

Four hours, first semester. 1:00, T, W, Th, F. Re- 
quired of all college students in the junior or senior 
year. This course will consist of a series of problems 
covering the more important phases of secondary edu- 
cation. Each student will be assigned a number of 
problems for investigation. — Mr. Shreve. 

Education 23 — School Administration and Supervision. 

Four hours, second semester. 11:00, M, W, Th, F. 
This course is designed to meet the needs of those 
preparing for administrative and supervisory posi- 
tions. The first half of the course will deal with the 
problems of school administration, and the second 
half with the supervision of instruction. — Mr. White. 

Education 24 — (Observation and Directed Teaching. 

Five hours, first or second semester, for ten or twelve 
weeks. Three hours' credit. Hours to be arranged. 
Required of all college students in the senior year. 
The student will observe and teach in the high school 
under the direction of the department of education or 
the major professor. — Mr. Shreve, Miss Hull, addi- 
tional instructor and Major Professor. 

Education 25 — Educational Sociology. 

Four hours, second semester. 1 :00, M, T, Th, F. In 
this course an attempt is made to apply the principles 
of sociology to the solution of educational problems. 
The discussions will center around two main pro- 



Fairmont State Normal School 49 

blems: the sociological foundations of Education, and 
sociological foundations of the school subjects. — Mr. 
Shreve. 

Education 26 — Tests and Measurements in the Secondary 
School. 

Four hours, second semester. Open to all college stu- 
dents in the junior or senior year. The main topics 
are : the measurement of mental ability, tests for use 
in secondary schools, and statistical methods applied 
to education. — Instructor to be chosen. 

AGRICULTURE 

Mr. Lively. 
Agriculture 20 — Agriculture. 

Five hours, first semester; four hours credit; 1:00, M, 
T, Th, F, and W, 2:50-3:45. The real problems of 
the West Virginia farmer are taken up in the most 
practical way. Seed selection, testing, harvesting and 
storing of grains and forage crops, feeding and care 
of animals, and the ordinary practical principles of 
dairying are features of the work. The care and 
value of manures, use of fertilizers, soil studies and 
preparation, planting and care of the orchard are 
made clear by actual demonstration. Special em- 
phasis is given to the nature and control of the com- 
mon pests and diseases of farm crops. Constant use 
is made of government bulletins, farm journals, etc. 
Prerequisites: Chemistry 1 and 2. 

Agriculture 21 — General Farm Problems. 

Four hours, second semester. In this course the gen- 
eral principles of agriculture set forth in Agriculture 
20 are intensified and specialized. Agriculture as 
found in the best modern practice is explained and 
discussed. Prerequisite: Agriculture 20. 



50 Fairmont State Normal School 

BIOLOGY 

Miss Ross 

The complete schedule, including hours for labora- 
tory work and field trips, is given on page 51. 

Biology 1 — Nature iStudy in Autumn. 

Four hours, first semester. Two hours' credit. 
Studies of birds, trees, flowers, insects, stars, and 
other objects of general interest to the student. Much 
of the work will be done outdoors. Individual as well 
as class hikes will be taken and written reports will 
be made. Materials considered will be those of the 
season at hand. At least two Saturdays must be re- 
served for field trips. 

Biology 2 — Nature Study in Spring. 

Four hours, second semester. Two hours' credit. A 
continuation of Biology 1. 

Biology 3 — Introduction to Botany. 

Six hours, first semester. Four hours' credit. A 
general survey of plant life. Topics: The science 
of botany, importance of soil, the functions of various 
parts of the plant, metabolism, relation of plant to 
environment and brief consideration of the four great 
divisions of the plant kingdom. 

Biology 20 — 'General Botany. 

Six hours, second semester. Four hours' credit. A 
more definite consideration of the four great divis- 
ions of the plant kingdom. Emphasis is laid on eco- 
logical relationships and economic values. Some field 
work in toxonomy will be done. Prerequisite : Biology 
1 or equivalent. 

Biology 22— ^General Biology. (Omitted 1925-26). 

Four hours' credit. In this course emphasis will be 
laid on the fundamental properties of protoplasm, the 
cell, metabolism, growth and reproduction. The lab- 
oratory work will include a study of typical plants 
and animals to show relations existing between the 
two kingdoms. Prerequisite: four hours of Biology. 



Fairmont State Normal School 



51 



10 


i 

IS 




I 

o 
S 








>> 

1 

n 




CM 

>> 

bo 
5 

15 

n 






o 


o 
o 


eo 

>> 

Ml 
O 

5 


eo 

>> 

bo 


M 




CO 

>. 

is 

s 


eo 

>> 

bo 
,0 


£ 




© 

>> 

bo 

^O 

3 


o 

& 

o 



s 




o 

<M 
>. 

I 

s 


o 
o 

s 


us 
© 

o 














o 
0> 
























oo 
























1 

I 


1 

1 


1 


1 
1 


1 

1 


>> 


0) 

I 
e 

o 

1 


>> 
a 






>> 
| 

in 

1 


>> 

B 

p 


>> 

1 



52 Fairmont State Normal School 

CHEMISTRY 

Mr. Rogers. Mr. Haught. 

The schedule of courses in Chemistry, including lab- 
oratory hours, is given on pages 82 and 83. Additional 
laboratory periods may be made by the instructors. 

A breakage fee of $2.50 for each course in chemistry 
is charged, to be paid at the beginning of the semester. 

Chemistry 1 — General Chemistry. 

Five hours, first semester. Four hours credit. There 
are two sections of Chemistry 1 : section 1 designed 
for students who present a year of high school chem- 
istry for entrance and section 2 designed for those 
who have had no previous work in chemistry. Stu- 
dents who enter these sections should note the accom- 
panying ruled table and find therein a laboratory 
period for his particular section which does not con- 
flict with hours of other subjects desired. 

This course, though treated somewhat differently 
in the two sections, includes in both the essential 
subject matter of the usual standard course of fresh- 
man college chemistry. This course does not aim to 
start students toward the goal of becoming chemists, 
but to give a general idea of this highly specialized 
field of thought. — Mr. Rogers and Mr. Haught. 

Chemistry 2 — General Chemistry. 

Five hours, second semester. Four hours credit. A 
continuation of Chemistry 2. The laboratory work 
in the second half of this course is largely devoted 
to a study of qualitative analysis. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 1. — Mr. Rogers and Mr. Haught. 

Chemistry 20 — Elementary Qualitative Chemical Analysis. 

Six hours, second semester. Three hours credit. This 
course trains the student to determine the composition 
of substances by a carefully arranged sequence of ex- 



Fairmont State Normal School 53 

periments. It is an essential preparation for more 
advanced courses in chemistry. It furnishes a review 
of the earlier work. Prerequisites: Chemistry 1 and 
2. — Mr. Rogers and Mr. Haught. 

Chemistry 21 — Elementary Quantitative Analysis. 

Seven hours, first semester. Four hours credit. Both 
gravimetric and volumetric methods are included in 
the work of this course. Prerequisites: Chemistry 1 
and 2, Mathematics 3, 4 and 5. This course consists 
principally of laboratory work, for which three dou- 
ble periods are required. — Mr. Rogers and Mr. 
Haught. 

Chemistry 23 — Organic Chemistry. 

Five hours, first semester. Four hours credit. The 
course will consist of two lectures, supplemented by 
demonstrations, one quiz, and three hours of labora- 
tory work a week. This is the first half of the fund- 
amental course in organic chemistry. It is devoted 
to the organization and methods of preparation of the 
aliphatic hydrocarbons and their derivatives. This 
course is recommended to students of dietetics, agri- 
culture and biology, and should be taken by all chem- 
istry majors. Prerequisites: Chemistry 1 and 2. If 
possible the student should also precede this course 
with Chemistry 20 and Physics 1 and 2. — Mr. 
Haught. 

Chemistry 24 — 'Organic Chemistry. 

Five hours, second semester. Four hours credit. A 
continuation of Chemistry 23. Prerequisite: Chem- 
istry 23. This course is devoted largely to a study of 
the coal tar compounds. Whenever possible, practi- 
cal applications are made to the arts and industries 
and useful illustrations are drawn from the students' 
own experience and knowledge. — Mr. Haught. 



54 Fairmont State Normal School 

Chemistry 25A — Teaching of Chemistry and Related 
Sciences. 

Four hours, first semester. Two hours credit. Open 
to a limited number of students. Prerequisites: 
Chemistry 1, 2, 21 and 22. This course will include 
practice in construction of demonstration apparatus, 
efficient handling of laboratory equipment and the 
problems peculiar to laboratory instruction; a study 
of the educational values of chemistry, and the most 
approved methods and devices for presenting the 
science to beginners. The reading of chemical jour- 
nals and other reference work in the library is in- 
cluded. — Mr. Rogers. 

Chemistry 25B — Teaching of Chemistry. 

Four hours, second semester. A repetition of Chem- 
istry 25A. — Mr. Rogers. 

ENGLISH 

Mr. Barnes Mrs. Morrow Miss Lewis Mr. Opp 

Courses required for English majors are marked with 
an asterisk. 

English 1 and 2 are required of all students. But 
since these courses are elementary, they will be waived 
if students pass satisfactory examinations upon entrance. 
But even if students take these courses or pass the exam- 
inations, they may be remanded to either or both courses 
if at any time their oral or written language falls below 
the standard. 

♦English 1A — Oral English Elements. 

Four hours, first semester, for half the semester. Two 
hours credit. First section, 10:15, M, T, W, F, first 
half semester; second section, 11:00, M, T, Th, F, 
last half semester; third section, 1:00, M, T, Th, F, 
first half semester. Required in all courses. This 
course includes all the elementary phases of 



Fairmont State Normal School 55 

oral language training needed by teachers; enuncia- 
tion, voice training, public speaking, reading aloud, 
etc. — Mr. Opp. 

♦English lB-^Oral English Elements. 

Four hours, second semester, for half the semester. 
Two hours' credit. First section, 9:10, M, T, W, Th, 
first half semester; second section, 11:00, M, T, Th, 
F, last half semester. A repetition of English 1A. 
— Mr. Opp. 

♦English 2A — Written English Elements. 

Four hours, first semester, for half the semester. Two 
hours' credit. First section, 10:05, M, T, W, F, last 
half semester; second section, 11:00, M, T, Th, F, 
first half semester; third section, 1:00 , M, T, Th, F, 
last half semester. Required in all the courses. A 
study of punctuation, capitalization, spelling, and out- 
lining, as well as form, neatness, etc.; themes twice 
a week. — Miss Lewis. 

♦English 2B— Written English Elements. 

Four hours, second semester, for half the semester. 
Two hours' credit. First section, 9:10, M, T, W, Th, 
last half semester; second section, 11:00, M, T, Th, 
F, first half semester. A repetition of English 2A. — 
Miss Lewis. 

English 3— ^Story Telling. 

Two hours, second semester. 2:50, M, W. Required 
in the primary curriculum of the standard Normal 
course. Study of the nature and structure of chil- 
dren's stories, selection of stories, and much training 
in the telling of stories. — Mr. Opp. 

English 4 — Children's Literature. 

Two hours, first semester. 11:00, M, Th. Required 
in the primary and intermediate curricula of the 



56 Fairmont State Normal School 

standard Normal course. A survey of the entire field 
of prose and poetry available and suitable for chil- 
dren in the elementary school. — Mr. Barnes. 

English 5 — Grammar. 

Two hours, first semester. 9:10, W, F, and four 
hours, spring term, at hours to be arranged. Design- 
ed for those who expect to teach English in the upper 
grades or junior high school. This course is designed 
to give teachers knowledge of the fundamentals of 
grammar. — Miss Lewis. 

English 6-^Juvenile Literature. 

Two hours, first semester. 11:00, T, F. Designed 
for those who expect to teach literature in the upper 
grades or junior high school. A survey of the best 
literature available for children in the upper grades, 
with special emphasis on literature for silent home 
reading. — Mr. Barnes. 

English 8 — Composition. 

Three hours, first semester. 9:10, M, T, Th. Design- 
ed to train Freshman and Sophomore students in the 
art of expressing their experiences, observations and 
reflections, in a clear and pleasing manner. Opportu- 
nity will be given for selecting the form and style 
best suited to the students' ability and preference. 
Prerequisite, English 2. — Miss Lewis. 

♦English 10 — Recent Fiction. 

Three hours, first semester. 8:15, T, Th, F. Re- 
quired of English majors. Steady reading of the best 
of British and American fiction of our times, with 
collateral study of the larger literary movements in 
fiction. — Mr. Mercer. 

♦English 11 — Recent Poetry. 

Two hours, second semester. 9:10, T, Th. Required 



Fairmont State Normal School 57 

of English majors. Reading of much contemporary 
poetry, American and British, with discussions and 
lectures on the new poetry movement. — Mr. Barnes. 

English 12 — The Modern American Magazine. 

Two hours, first semester. 1:55, M, W. Reading of 
the best of the popular and literary magazines of 
today, with the effort to appraise and classify them. 
— Miss Lewis. 

English 13 — Recent Drama. 

Two hours, second semester. 1:00 T, Th. Study of 
many recent plays, British, Continental and Amer- 
ican. — Mr. Opp. 

English 24S— American Literature From 1870 to 1900. 

Four hours, summer, two hours credit. A survey of 
the last thirty years before nineteen hundred in 
American literature. Much reading in all the prin- 
cipal authors. — Mrs. Morrow. 

* English 25 — Victorian Literature. 

Four hours, first semester. 11:00, M, T, Th, F. Re- 
quired of English majors. A survey study of the 
essays and of the fiction and poetry of the nineteenth 
century. — Mrs. Morrow. 

English 2GS — Introduction to Tennyson. 

Four hours, summer, two hours credit. Wide reading 
of much of Tennyson's verse, close reading of typical 
masterpieces. — Mr. Barnes. 

English 27S — Introduction to Browning. 

Four hours, summer, two hours credit. This course 
is designed to acquaint the student with many of 
Browning's best verse and to give him training in in- 
terpreting Browning. — Mr. Barnes. 



58 Fairmont State Normal School 

English 28 — Wordsworth as Poet and Educator. 

Two hours, first semester. 9:10, T, Th. Wide read- 
ing in Wordsworth, with special emphasis upon those 
poems which contain educational ideas. — Mr. Barnes. 

English 29 — The Classical Age in English Literature. 

Two hours, second semester. 1:55, M, W. Steady 
reading, for appreciation and comparative study, of 
the works of the chief writers of the eighteenth cen- 
turay, from Dryden to Goldsmith. — Miss Lewis. 

English 30— Milton's Poetry. (Omitted in 1925-26). 

Two hours, first semester. 9:10, T, Th. Careful 
study, from a literary and linguistic standpoint, of 
"Comus", and "Paradise Lost", and the minor poems. 
Mr. Barnes. 

♦English 31 — Shakespeare. 

Three hours, second semester. 10:05, M, W, F. Re- 
quired of English majors. Reading of ten of the 
principal plays, with emphasis upon the literary and 
dramatic elements. — Mrs. Morrow. 

♦English 32— Middle English. 

Three hours, second semester. 9:10, M, W, F. Re- 
quired of English majors. Study of the chief writers 
of the middle English period, with chief emphasis on 
Chaucer, Langland, and Gower. This is primarily a 
course in the English language. — Mr. Barnes. 

English 33 — The Bible. 

Three hours, first semester. 10:05, M, W, F. The 
aim of this course is to indicate the main literary 
types found in the Bible and to familiarize the stu- 
dent with the wealth and variety of its literature. A 
general knowledge of the Bible as a whole — its theme, 
structure, and books — will be given, but emphasis 



Fairmont State Normal School 59 

will be placed upon the literary elements in the Old 
Testament. — Mrs. Morrow. 

English 34— The New Testament. 

Three hours, second semester. 11:00, M, T, F. An 
intensive study of the literary types and elements in 
the New Testament. — Mrs. Morrow. 

English 35 — Nature in Poetry. 

Two hours, first semester. 9:10, W, F. A careful 
study of nature as interpreted by Wordsworth, 
Byron, Shelley, Bryant, and Lowell. — Mrs. Morrow. 

English 36— The Short Story. 

Two hours, second semester. 1:00, T, Th. Much 
reading of specimens of the classic short-story, con- 
sidered as a type of prose narrative. — Miss Lewis. 

'English 39 — (Survey of British and American Literature. 

Four hours, first semester. 1:00, M, T, W, Th. Re- 
quired of English majors. In this course, which 
should be taken in the senior college year, the student 
is given a chronological survey of the entire field of 
British and American literature, from the earliest 
times down to the present. Prerequisites: English 
10, 11, 25, 32.— Mrs. Morrow. 

English 40 — Narrative and Descriptive Writing. 

Two hours, second semester. 1:55, T, Th. An ad- 
vanced course, designed to give especially talented 
students an opportunity to receive training in these 
types of writing. — Miss Lewis. 

♦English 41 — Expository Writing. 

Two hours, second semester. 11:00, T, Th. Required 
of all college students in junior or senior year. De- 
signed to train in the making of expositions and the 
writing of papers upon themes of some difficulty. — 
Mr. Barnes. 



60 Fairmont State Normal School 

♦English 42 — Public Speaking. 

Two hours, second semester. 1:00, M, W. Required 
of English majors. This course, to be taken in either 
the junior or senior college year, is designed to give 
students training in the art of preparing and deliver- 
ing public speeches. — Mr. Opp. 

English 45 — Dramatization and Play Production. 

Two hours, first semester. 9:10, T, Th. The coach- 
ing and presenting of plays. This course is designed 
to acquaint students with the art of dramatic expres- 
sion and pageantry, to equip them to select plays and 
adapt material, and to carry on dramatic activities 
in schools where they teach. — Mr. Opp. 

English 46 — Extra-Curricular English Activities. 

Two hours, either semester. Hours to be arranged. 
An informal and flexible course. Any student or 
group of students engaged in activities which develop 
speech and literary ability, may, upon request, receive 
instruction in, supervision of, and credit for this work. 
The amount of credit is to be determined by the super- 
visor, but shall not exceed two hours in any one 
semester nor more than six hours in all. Organiza- 
tion is as follows : 

46 (A). Oratory and Debate — Practical oratory 
and debate. Speech training. Should be taken by 
those interested in public speaking and those students 
desiring to participate in intercollegiate debate and 
oratorical contests. 

46 (B). Journalism — Work is designed to enable 
students to acquire journalistic style and skill in 
newspaper-writing and reporting. Should be taken 
by those desiring to work on the staff of the school 
paper. 

46 (C). Dramatics— Drama'ic expression, the- 
ory and practice. Participation in the productions of 



Fairmont State Normal School 61 

the dramatic club. Should be taken by members of 
the dramatic club desiring instruction and training 
for credit. 

46 (D). Story Telling — The aim of this work is 
to acquaint students with the art of story telling in 
the school, community-club, or in play-ground work. 
A story telling club will facilitate this work. — Mr. 
Opp. 

* English 47 — Teaching English in the High School. 

Two hours, first semester. 9:10, M, W. Required of 
English majors and of those preparing to teach Eng- 
lish in the junior high school. Study of the modern 
method of teaching both literature and English lan- 
guage in the junior and senior high school. Prerequi- 
site or parellel: English 39. — Mr. Barnes. 

FINE ARTS 

Music, Miss Osborn. Art, Miss Howard. 

MUSIC 

Music 1A — Elementary Music. 

Four hours, first semester. Two hours' credit. 1:55, 
M, T, W, F. This course consists of musical theory, 
appreciation of music, and the work required by the 
syllabus for the first and second years of school, dic- 
tion, rote songs, and sight singing. 

Music IB — Elementary Music. 

Four hours, second semester. Two hours' credit. 
1:55, M, T, W, F. A repetition of Music 1A. 

Music 2A — Music Methods. 

Four hours, first semester. Two hours credit. 2:50, 
M, T, W, Th. This course is devoted to the teaching 
and demonstration of material and methods for the 
first three years in music. Special attention is given 



62 Fairmont State Normal School 

to the presentation of the different tonal and rythmic 
problems as they are taken up in successive years. 
Prerequisite: Music 1, or its equivalent. 

Music 2B — Music Methods. 

Four hours, second semester. Two hours credit. 
10 :05, M, T, W, F. A repetition of Music 1A. 

Music 3A— ^Glee Club. 

Two hours, first semester. One hour's credit. 3:45, 
M, W. This course consists of voice and chorus train- 
ing. Cantatas and choruses suitable for high and 
normal schools and for choirs, choral societies will be 
studied and sung at public concerts. 

Music 3B— Glee Club. 

Two hours, second semester. One hour credit. 3:45, 
M, W. A repetition of Music 2A. 

Music 4A — Music Methods. 

Four hours, first semester. Two hours' credit. 9:10, 
M, T, Th, F. Required of Standard Normal students 
who are enrolled in the intermediate curriculum. This 
course is -devoted to the teaching and supervision of 
music in the grades from the fourth to the sixth. The 
work of each year is taken up in detail and problems 
which confront the grade teacher are carefully con- 
sidered. Prerequisite: Music 1, or its equivalent. 

Music 4B — Music Methods. 

Four hours, second semester. Two hours' credit. 
9:10, M, T, Th, F. A repetition of Music 3 A. 

Music 20 — Music Appreciation and History of Music. 

Four hours, first semester. 1:00, M, T, W, Th. This 
course is designed to cover the teaching of music ap- 
preciation in the elementary and in high schools. It 
will suggest and exemplify a practical course of study 
beginning with the first year of the elementary school 
and extending through the high school. 



Fairmont State Normal School 63 

Music 21 — Sight Reading. 

Four hours, first semester. Two hours' credit. 10 :05, 
M, T, W, F. This course includes singing at sight 
individually, with words and with Latin syllables, 
music suitable for the first eight years in the public 
schools. An important requirement of this course is 
the ability to sing a phrase from memory after one 
glance at the representation. 

Music 22 — Harmony. 

Four hours, second semester. Four hours' credit. 
1:00, M, T, W, Th. Admission to this course requires 
a working knowledge of the rudiments of music. 
Chord relationship. Relation of harmony to rhythm 
and metric accents. Form as a factor in the selection 
of harmonies and their inversions. Application of 
these principles in the harmonization of melodies. 
Employment of non-chordal tones. Analysis. Dis- 
criminative hearing is an essential. 

Music 23A — Class Lessons in Voice. 

Two hours, first semester. One hour credit. 3:45, 
T, Th. Individual and class instruction and demon- 
stration. The foundation of singing, breath control; 
phrasing; accent, rythm and enunciation. Good tone 
quality. 

Music 23B — Class Lessons in Voice. 

Two hours, second semester. One hour credit. 3:45, 
T, Th. A repetition of Music 23A. 

ART 

Art 1 — Elementary Drawing and Painting. 

Four hours, first semester. Two hours' credit. First 
section, 10:05, M, T, W, F; second section, 1:00, M, 
T, Th, F. Required of Standard Normal students 
enrolled for the primary or intermediate curriculum. 



64 Fairmont State Normal School 

who have not had elementary drawing in high school. 
The course includes the study of the landscape, plant 
and animal forms in both pictoral and decorative 
compositions. 

Art 3 — Primary Construction. 

Two hours, first semester. One hour credit. 1:55, M, 
W. All kinds of handwork suitable for the first four 
grades are planned in this course. Exercises in weav- 
ing, folding and cutting with various mediums. 

Art 4 — Advanced Construction. 

Two hours, first semester. One hour credit. 1:55, T, 
Th. Construction problems suitable for the upper 
grades are planned in this course, as portfolios, kodak 
books, blotter pads, boxes, lanterns, candle shades, 
table runners, etc. 

Art 5 — Drawing Methods. 

Four hours, second semester. Two hours' credit. 
First section, 9:15, M, T, Th, F; second section, 1:00, 
M, T, Th, F. Required of Standard Normal students 
who are enrolled in the primary or intermediate cur- 
riculum. It is the aim in this course to study the dif- 
ferent systems of public school art and to make an 
illustrated note book outlining the work for the eight 
grades. This should follow the course in elementary 
drawing. 

Art 20 — Art Appreciation. 

Three hours, first semester. 9:15, M, W, F. This 
course includes a series of talks on architecture, 
painting and sculpture with the aim of awakening 
understanding and enjoyment. 

Art 21 — Perspective. 

Two hours, first semester. 9:15, T, Th. This course 
includes the study of the common forms about us and 
the principles governing the expression of these ob- 



Fairmont State Normal School 



jects as found in cylindrical and rectangular pros- 
pective, mediums used; pencil charcoal, crayon and 
pencil. 

Art 22 — Design. 

Four hours, second semester. 11:00, M, T, Th, F. 
Two hours' credit. This course includes the study of 
the principles of design. Original designs applied in 
leather, metal, block printing and stenciling. 

FRENCH 

Miss Ice 

French 1 — Beginners' Course. (Omitted 1925-26). 

Four hours, first semester. 8:15, T, W, Th, F. Ele- 
ments of grammar ; pronunciation ; phonetics ; regular 
and common and irregular verbs; simple vocabulary; 
reading of easy prose; oral and written composition. 
Fraser and Squair's New French Grammar. 

French 2— Beginners' Course. (Omitted 1925-26). 

Four hours, second semester. 8:15, T, W, Th, F. 
Continuation and completion of elementary grammar; 
reading of selections of prose and poetry; oral and 
written composition; dictation; emphasis on careful 
pronunciation. 

French 20 — Modern Prose and Plays. 

Four hours, first semester. 11:00, M, T, Th, F. 
Reading of short stories, easy drama and novels; sys- 
tematic gaining of a serviceable reading vocabulary 
for literature; review of grammar with special study 
of the irregular verbs ; practice in speaking and writ- 
ing. 

French 21 — Modern Prose and Plays. 

Four hours, second semester. 11:00, M, T, Th, F. 
Continuation of French 20. 



66 Fairmont State Normal School 

French 22 — Introduction to French Literature. 

Three hours, first semester. 8:15, T, Th, F. Study 
of representative authors of various periods; expres- 
sive reading and imparting of literary appreciation. 

French 23 — Introduction to French Literature. 

Three hours, second semester. 8:15, T, Th, F. Con- 
tinuation of French 22. 

French 24 — Advanced Composition. 

One hour, first semester. 8:15, W. Must be taken 
with French 22 or preceded by it. 

French 25 — Advanced Composition. 

One hour, second semester. 8:15, W. Continuation 
of French 24. 

GEOGRAPHY 

Miss Ross 
Geography 1 — Elements of Geography. 

Five hours, first semester. Four hours' credit. 9:10, 
M, T, W, Th, F. A preliminary course of general 
value but planned especially as a practical course for 
teachers. Topics: the field of geography; earth 
study, forces and processes which work to change 
the land surface; relief features and their influence 
on man; weather and climate, their elements and 
effects. 

Geography 2 — Principles of Human Geography. (Omitted 
1925-26). 

Five hours, four hours' credit. A study of the 
specific group of geographic phenomena which are 
contained within the limits of physical geography but 
which are more or less related to man. Topics: cli- 
mate, location, land forms, bodies of water, soils and 
minerals are studied to determine how they influence 



Fairmont State Normal School 67 

Geography 20 — Economic and Commercial Geography of 

the United States. (Omitted 1925-26). 
Four hours. The chief commercial products of 
United States will be considered, the geographical 
factors influencing their production, transportation, 
consumption and conservation will be discussed. A 
few industries in Fairmont will be studied. Maga- 
zines and newspaper articles will be used in the study 
of current commercial problems. Prerequisite: 
Geography 1 or 2. 

Geography 21 — Regional Geography of North America. 

Four hours, second semester. 9:10, T, W, Th, F. 
A study of the natural regions of North America, 
their influence on man and man's response. Prerequi- 
site: Geography 1 or 2. 

HISTORY 

Mr. Stewart. Miss Prichard. 

Courses marked with a star are required of History 
majors. 

♦History 1 — American History. 

Three hours, first semesetr. 8:15, T, W. F. The 
aim is to acquaint the student with the great national 
achievements to the time of the Civil War. Attention 
given to European conditions behind the New World 
movement, a brief sketch of colonial political and 
social conditions. The latter part of the course is 
concerned with the growth of democracy in the early 
republic, westward extension, and the development of 
the slavery controversy. — Mr. Stewart. 

♦History 2 — American History. 

Three hours ,second semester. 8:15, T, W. F. A 
continuation of History 1. Beginning with the Civil 
War this course traces political and social develop- 
ments, increasing importance of the United States in 



Fairmont State Normal School 



international politics, and her participation in the 
World War. — Mr. Stewart. 

*History 3 — Modern European History. 

Three hours, first semester. 1:00, M, T, Th. De- 
signed primarily for freshmen and sophomores. The 
aim of the course is to give the student an apprecia- 
tion of the conditions which were antecedent to and 
responsible for the Great War and a general knowl- 
edge of conditions as they are today in Europe. The 
course includes a study of the movements of the im- 
portant periods in the history of Europe from 1492 to 
the present time. — Miss Prichard. 

*History 4 — Modern European History. 

Three hours, second semester. 1 :00, M, T, Th. A 
continuation of History 3. — Miss Prichard. 

History 20— ^Grecian History. (Omitted 1925-26). 

Four hours, first semester. 11:00, M, T, Th, F. De- 
signed primarily for college sophomores and juniors. 
The aim is to trace the development of ancient civ- 
ilization to its culmination in the Athens of the 
Periclean Age, to discover the causes of the fall of 
Greece, and what were her gifts to world civilization ; 
Grecian history to the death of Alexander the Great. 
— Mr. Stewart. 

History 21 — Roman History. 

Four hours, first semester. 11:00, M, T, Th, F. De- 
signed primarily for college sophomores and juniors. 
The aim of the course is to trace the development and 
the decline of the Roman Empire, particular attention 
being given to Roman political institutions and 
Roman law. Beginning with the earliest times the 
history of Rome will be followed to 565 A. D.— Mr. 
Stewart. 



Fairmont State Normal School 



History 22 — Economic and Social History of the United 
States. 

Four hours, first semester. 9:10, M, T, Th, F. The 
aim is to acquaint the student with the importance 
and significance of the present day social and eco- 
nomic movements. A topical presentation of the 
social and economic development of our country. — 
Miss Prichard. 

History 23 — (Social and Industrial History of England. 

Four hours, second semester. 9:10, M, T, Th, F. 
The aim of the course is to give the student an ap- 
preciation of the importance and significance of the 
present day social and economic conditions and move- 
ments in England. A brief summary of the social 
and economic background of England prior to the 
eighteenth century — a topical presentation of the 
social and economic developments in England begin- 
ning with the eighteenth century. — Miss Prichard. 

History 24 — History of Latin America. 

Four hours, second semester. 11:00, M, T, W, Th. 
The aim of the course will be to present to the student 
the material for forming a clear conception of the 
position and importance of the Latin American states 
in the political and economic life of the Western 
Hemisphere. Chief emphasis upon the period since 
the states gained their independence from Spain; 
special attention to the diplomatic and other relations 
with the United States. Prerequisite: History 1 and 
2. — Mr. Stewart. 

*History 25 — History of the Middle Ages. 

Four hours, second semester. 2:50, M, T, W, Th. 
This course is designed to bridge the gap between the 
history of the Roman Empire and that of the Mod- 
ern European states, about 600 to 1500. Chiefly 
concerned with such great movements as rise and de- 
cline of Charlemagne's empire, monasticism, rise of 
towns, the Crusades, the Renaissance. — Mr. Stewart. 



70 Fairmont State Normal School 

♦History 26— The Teaching of History in the High School. 

Three hours, first semester. 2:50, M, T, Th. Design- 
ed for college seniors who are preparing to teach his- 
tory in the high school. A consideration of aims in 
teaching history; the history recitation; teaching 
pupils to study general and special methods of pro- 
cedure; supplementary reading and illustrative ma- 
terial; note book and written work; teaching cur- 
rent events, etc. Prerequisite: twelve hours of col- 
lege history including History 1 and 2. — Mr. Stewart. 

HOME ECONOMICS 

Domestic Science, Miss Gaskill 

Domestic Art, Miss Compton 

The schedule of courses is on pages 75-77. This in- 
cludes both recitation and laboratory hours. Courses 
marked with stars are required of majors in Home Eco- 
nomics. 

Home Economics 1 — Elementary Foods and Cookery. 

Seven hours, first semester. One discussion period 
and two three-hour laboratory periods. Four hours 
credit. A study of foods in relation to source, com- 
position, characteristics, nutritive value, digestion, 
cost and place in the daily diet. Special attention 
given to the development of ease and accuracy in the 
cooking of type foods, and to gaining definite stand- 
ards for preparing dishes of these foods. 
*Home Economics 3 — Home Cookery and Table Service. 
Seven hours, second semester. One discussion period 
and two three-hour laboratory periods. Four hours' 
credit. Required of Home Economics majors. A 
more advanced Cookery course, making use of princi- 
ples and processes learned in preceding courses. 
Meals will be planned and executed with emphasis on 
marketing and serving. Prerequisite: Home Eco- 
nomics 1. 



Fairmont State Normal School 71 



Home Economics 21 — Nutrition. 

Six hours, first semester. Two one-hour lecture 
periods and two two-hour laboratory periods per 
week. Three hours' credit. This course deals with 
food as building and regulating materials in relation 
to the chemistry of physiology and digestion; the 
quantitative basis in the selection of food for the nor- 
mal adults and children. Practical work in planning 
meals to meet the needs of individual members of the 
class and a very brief survey of the place of nutrition 
as a part of the health program. Prerequisite : Home 
Economics 3 and Organic Chemistry. 

Home Economics 23 — Housewifery and Home Manager 
ment. 

Five hours, second semester. Two two-hour labora- 
tory periods, one one-hour discussion period. Three 
hours' credit. This course deals with the division of 
space in the house: plumbing, heating and lighting; 
equipment and labor-saving devices, household sup- 
plies, storage, cleaning and care of rooms. Part of the 
time will be devoted to the general management of the 
house; family income; household accounting; bud- 
gets; business principles applicable to the household 
and system in the house. 

Home Economics 25 — Home Nursing and Child Care. 

Two hours, first semester. Two one-hour periods per 
week. Cause and prevention of sickness. The nurse, 
the care of the patient and the sickroom. Communi- 
cable diseases and emergencies. The care and feed- 
ing of infants and children in the home; school and 
home problems relating $0 the health of children. 

*Home Economics 26 — Home Economics Methods. 

Three hours, first semester. Required of Home Eco- 
nomics majors. A study of the development of edu- 
cation for women; the organization of material for 



72 Fairmont State Normal School 



home economic education. Emphasis is placed upon 
the course of study and lesson plans for the elemen- 
tary grades and high school; equipment, text books, 
administrative problems, reference and illustrative 
material. Half of the time will be devoted to cloth- 
ing and half to foods. Prerequisite: All required 
Home Economic courses and Education 20 and 22. 

"Home Economics 27 — Practice Teaching. 

Three hours, second semester. Required of Home 
Economics majors. A carefully supervised study in 
practice teaching of home economics, and related sub- 
jects. Classroom discussion of lesson plans, personal 
conferences and supervision of each lesson taught. 

Home Economics 2 — Elementary Clothing. 

Seven hours, first semester, four hours' credit. One 
class hour and two three-hour laboratory periods. 
This course deals with the fundamental principles of 
construction and practice in fundamental processes. 
Emphasis is placed upon suitability of material and 
economical purchasing. Use of commercial patterns 
with some drafting combination of machine and hand 
sewing. Color and line problems as related to dress 
will be studied. Some time is devoted to the history 
and use of various textile fibers. 

Home Economics 22 — Advanced Clothing. 

Seven hours, second semester, four hours' credit. One 
class hour and two! three-hour laboratory periods. 
This course provides instruction in planning, buying, 
cutting, fitting and making of dresses. Emphasis is 
placed on good design, choice of materials, use and 
adaptation of commercial patterns. A detailed study 
of various' textiles is given careful consideration, 
study of clothing budget will also be made. Prerequi- 
site: Home Economics 2. 



Fairmont State Normal School 73 

*Home Economics 24A — Costume Design. 

Five hours, first semester. Three hours' credit. One 
class hour and two two-hour laboratory periods. Re- 
quired of Home Economics majors. This course aims 
to give opportunity for individual expression of ar- 
tistic taste in dress. Costumes are designed on paper 
with pencil and brush. The designs are then pro- 
duced in cloth. Prerequisites: Home Economics 4 
and Art 1. 

Home Economics 24B — 'Costume Design. 

Five hours, second semester. A repetition of Home 
Economics 6A. 

*Home Economics 28 — Millinery. 

Four hours, first semester, two hours' credit. Two 
two-hour laboratory periods. Required of Home 
Economics majors. This course aims to teach prac- 
tical millinery. It includes remodeling and the mak- 
ing, covering, and trimming of crinoline and willow 
frames. Consideration is given to types of hats and 
their suitability to the wearer. Prerequisite: Home 
Economics 2. 

*Home Economics 30 — Children's Clothing. 

Four hours, second semester, two hours' credit. Two 
two-hour laboratory periods. Required of Home 
Economics majors. This course includes the planning, 
purchasing and making of children's clothing, consid- 
ering hygiene, comfort, beauty, and practicability. 
In the laboratory special emphasis is laid upon ma- 
chine work, use of machine attachments, and easy 
decorative schemes. The child's clothing budget is 
also a feature of this course. Prerequisite: Home 
Economics 4. 



74 Fairmont State Normal School 

*Home Economics 31 — Home Planning and Furnishing. 

Five hours, first semester, three hours' credit. One 
class hour and two two-hour laboratory periods. 
Required of Home Economics majors. This course 
aims to establish sound principles for home-making. 
A study of the evolution of the home ; modern houses ; 
location; construction, drainage, ventilation, lighting, 
heating and water supply from a scientific, sanitary, 
economic, and artistic standpoint. The study also 
includes simple interiors; period and modern furni- 
ture; choice and arrangement of furnishings for the 
home. Prerequisite: Art 1. 



Fairmont State Normal School 



75 



in 












"* 












e<S 












O 












in 












C"J 




to 




o 








1 




1 








O 











to 


C 




c 




m 


1 


O 


V 

a 

o 
c 
o 

1* 


o 






o 


1 


g 

o 

H 






e 
e 






a; 






** 




K Q 






o 












S 












,_< 
























us 












e 












o 






























3 


fa 




o 












•Jj 


via 




O lO 


0>i-t 




OS 


g 




J 


s 











s 


5 






W 






w 






fa 


a 


A 


fa 


fa 


CO 


I" 


a>c? 


r 


1 


1" 




w 


w 


w 


w 


w 


hi 












V 
























1 












S 






>> 






GO 


>, 


>> 


cfl 


>> 




w 


4 


73 


1 


T3 
to 


>> 

83 


h 


c 


'$ 


»d 


3 


2 


fa 


6 


3 






fa 



76 



Fairmont State Normal School 



s 


S 






s 


£ 




o 


c 


e 


o 




«t- 


o so 


W 


a H 


1 


s 


o 


o 


H 


H 



O) t- 










to 


to 










1 




a 




a 
o 


o 




i 


o 
M 




o 









J>> 






bJ 


>> 


>l 


X! 












C 


o 


i 





Fairmont State Normal School 



77 



in 












W5 












tj< 












"* 












n 












OS 












© 












e 












m 












Ui 












<N 


to 




CO 


to 




SM 


to 




to 


10 






.a 




o 


.y 






_o 




.% 


o 






s 




1 


S 






s 




1 


i 






o 




s 


Q 






o 







O 






c 




c 


c 






c 


to 


£ 


C 






1- 


.2 
1 


1- 


O 






o 

Or* 


1 





8<j 

H «5 






2 


c 


tt) 


a> 






cu 


C 


0) 


0> 






1 





o 


I 






s 

o 


8<! 


a 




o 














S 


w 


« 






w 




W 


w 




© 
© 




I 








O 
© 




1 

o 


















i-( 




W 
















«J 




















to 
o 




w 


to 


© 

© 


to 

o 








to 
o 


£ 




1 

1= 




1 


I 

C 


^ 


1 








1 














• 




e 


05 


I 


(0 

o 




I 


© 


I 




H 




I 






o 






o 




o 




uf 




o 


e 


O 


w 


i- 




a 


© 


W 




s 

o 




W 


d 


















© 


I 


cytM 
1 


1 






© 
© 




s 

o 

8«o 




3 

! 




















w^ 




W^ 






u 








u 








o 








H 




H 




w 






cy 


H 


cp 




to 


r 




CP<N 

HI 




CD CM 

I" 


US 




i 


I s 

A 


g 

o 

w 
















M 












u 












V 












9 




































to 












ft 












V 












S 
g 






>> 






i 






>> 






03 

09 

s- 


>> 

s 

1 


>> 

1 

I 


to 
1 

1 


>> 

C3 


>> 

OS 


02 

I 

02 


C 
O 


>> 


cti 

1 

tJ 


>> 
H 





78 Fairmont State Normal School 

MATHEMATICS 

Mr. McCarty. Mr. Mercer. 

Mathematics 1 will be waived upon satisfactory en- 
trance examination. 

Mathematics 1A — Teachers' Arithmetic. 

Two hours, first semester. 9:10, T, Th. Required of 
all students taking the intermediate or junior high 
curriculum. The course includes a study of the prin- 
ciples, processes, and history of arithmetic, and much 
drill in the solution of problems. All of the impor- 
tant topics of Arithmetic are considered from the 
viewpoint of the teacher. — Mr. McCarty. 

Mathematics liB — Teachers' Arithemetic. 

Two hours, second semester. 9:10, T, Th. A repeti- 
tion of Mathematics 1. — Mr. McCarty. 

Mathematics 2 — Algebra. 

Three hours, first semester. Two hours credit. 1:00, 
M, W, F. For those offering only one unit of algebra 
for entrance. A rigid review of elementary algebra, 
and in addition the general methods of factoring, rad- 
icals, quadratics, graphs, progression, and the bin- 
omial theorem. — Mr. Mercer, 

Mathematics 3 — Plane Geometry. 

Three hours, first semester. 9:10, M, W, F. Open to 
first year students, not offering plane geometry for 
entrance. The usual theorems are supplemented with 
numerous exercises and original construction prob- 
lems. — Mr. Mercer. 

Mathematics 4 — Plane Geometry. 

Three hours, second semester. 9:10, M, T, F. A con- 
tinuation of Mathematics 3. — Mr. Mercer. 



Fairmont State Normal School 79 

Mathematics 5 — iSolid Geometry. 

Four hours, second semester. 10:05, M, T, W, F. 
Open to first and second year students not offering 
this subject for entrance. This course includes 
theorems on lines, planes, and solids. Emphasis is 
placed upon original exercises and construction, and 
the nature of mathematical proof. — Mr. Mercer. 

Mathematics 20 — Trigonometry. 

Four hours, first semester. 10:05, M, T, W, F. The 
development and use of trigonometric functions, re- 
lations between junctions, logarithms, and solution of 
triangles. Applications of functions and formulae 
are made by the use of many practical problems. Pre- 
requisites : Mathematics 2, 3 and 4. — Mr. Mercer. 

Mathematics 21 — College Algebra. 

Four hours, second semester. 8:15, T, W, Th, F. A 
study of the general quadratic and simultaneous 
quadratic equations, progression, variation, logar- 
ithms, mathematical induction, functions, theory of 
equations, permutations, combinations and determin- 
ants. Prerequisite: Mathematics 2. — Mr. McCarty. 

Mathematics 22 — Analytic Geometry. 

Four hours, first semester. 8:15, T, W, Th, F. A 
brief practical treatment of the system of coordinates, 
geometric magnitudes, loci, and their equations. The 
straight line, circle, parabola, ellipse and hyperbola. 
Exercises illustrating the analytic method are stress- 
ed throughout the course. Prerequisites: Mathemat- 
ics 20 and 21. — Mr. McCarty. 

Mathematics 23— Calculus. (Omitted 1925-26). 

Four hours, first semester. 8:15, T, W, Th, F. The 
fundamental principles and idea of calculus and its 
application to the sciences and other mathematics. A 
brief treatment of limits, differentiation, summation, 



80 Fairmont State Normal School 

algebraic, trigonometric, and logarithmic functions, 
series and integration. Prerequisites: Mathematics 5 
and 20. 

Mathematics 24 — Teaching of Secondary Mathematics. 

Three hours, first semester. 9:10, M, W, F. Pre- 
requisite, twelve hours of college mathematics. This 
course is designed to meet the needs of teachers of 
mathematics in the junior and senior high schools. 
An examination of mathematics as found in the pres- 
ent day courses of study. Aims of mathematical in- 
struction; selection, and organization of subject mat- 
ter and the approved methods of teaching. Prerequi- 
sites: Twelve hours of College Mathematics. 

Mathematics 25 — History of Mathematics. (Omitted 1925- 
26). 

Two hours, second semester. 9:10, T, Th. To give 
teachers and students of mathematics a knowledge 
and appreciation of the historical development of the 
high school subjects: arithmetic, algebra, geometry 
and trigonometry. Some attention is also given to 
the development of method. Prerequisites: Twelve 
hours of College Mathematics. — Mr. McCarty. 

PHYSICS 

Mr. Haught 

The schedule of courses in Physics, including labor- 
atory hours, is given on pages 82 and 83. 

Physics 1 — General Physics. 

Five hours, first semester. Four hours credit. 11:00, 
M, T, F, and a two-hour laboratory period Thursday 
beginning at 1:00. Those who cannot reserve the 
designated laboratory period should consult the in- 
structor before completing arrangements for other 
courses. The aim of this course is not only to famil- 






Fairmont State Normal School 81 

iarize the student with many of the facts, phenomena 
and laws concerning mechanics, heat, light, sound 
and electricity, but to train in the methods of science 
and in scientific thinking. Stewart's College Physics 
is the text. Prerequisites: Mathematics 2, 3 and 20 
and high school chemistry. 

Physics 2 — General Physics. 

Five hours, second semester. Four hours credit. 
11:00, M, T, F and a two-hour laboratory period to be 
arranged. A continuation of Physics 1. 



82 



Fairmont State Normal School 



o 
















kO 












e* 












1A 




^ 








•" 


>-« 


1 


55 


rt 


iM 




II 


i 


i 

o 


8 

is 


I 


O 


o 




^3 








,H 




Q 










- 




- 




a . 


- 


1 


& 


-» 






S3 c 

1 o 


DO 




on 




"co 




*m 




>, 


1 

i 


J3 




8 


>> 




eo 


eo 


eo 








in 


CI 


<N 


evj 








© 


a 


6 


e 


i 








s 


1 




J 


J8 






eo 




o 




o 


o 






i 


























o 












rH 


e 


Jj 


CO 




J* 


ll 














o 


o 














<N 


<M 


IM 


w 






a §1 


1° 


i* 


oo 






•SoB 


*c£ 


J* 








s 


O 


o 








>> 












1 


* 






>> 

<s 
"P 


1 




1 

DO 






c 


$ 


-o 


3 


"9 




li 


5 


£ 


£ 







£ 



Fairmont State Normal School 



83 



£ 





o 
in 


















irt 


1 

CM 

1 


CM 

1 

s 


© 

<M 

s 
ji 

o 


CM 

OJ 

en 
>. 

J3 
P* 


o 

CM 

1 




s 




© 
© 




9 

1 
CO 

I 


CM 

.2 
'35 




PQ 
m 

CM 

1 

o 


I 
05 

>> 

Ph 




US 

© 


£ 


i 


5M 

1 






IN 

1 
o 




e 


i 

CO 

1 

O 


CM 

1 

CM 

O 


CM 


CM 

8 jS 


IM 




us 

00 


<M 
CM 

6 W 


CM 
CM 

2 * 


CM 
CM 

o 








i 




| 


>> 

2 


: 


>> 

i 

3 



84 Fairmont State Normal School 

PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Mr. Colebank. Miss Strieby. 

Before being assigned to physical education,* a stu- 
dent is given a medical and physical examination. Those 
who are not able to take the courses are given special at- 
tention. 

The student must provide himself with gym suit and 
shoes. 

Members of the various athletic squads may, upon 
recommendation of Mr. Colebank or Miss Strieby, be per- 
mitted to substitute this athletic training for any regular 
course in Physical Education except Physical Education 
3 or 4. But this athletic training must be entered upon 
the student's assignment card, and the credit given must 
not bring the total number of hours above eighteen. 

Physical Education 1 — Physiology and Hygiene. 

Three hours, first semester. First section (Miss 
Strieby) 9:15, M, H, F; second section (Miss Strieby) 
10:05, M, T, F; third section (Mr. Colebank) 10:05, 
M, T, W. Required in all courses. The facts and 
principles of Anatomy and Physiology are taught in 
so far as they furnish some basis and reason for the 
more practical rules of hygiene. The nature and 
cause of common diseases are discussed together with 
means of prevention. There will be numerous class 
room demonstrations an dsome laboratory work. 

COURSES FOR WOMEN 

Physical Education 2 — Elementary Physical Education. 

Four hours, first semester. Two hours' credit. 3:45, 
M, T, W, Th. Consists of setting up exercises for 
posture training, including relays and simple games. 

Physical Education 3 — Teachers' Primary Physical Educa- 
tion. 

Four hours, second semester. Two hours' credit. 
11:00, M, T, Th, F. Required of all Standard Normal 



Fairmont State Normal School 85 



Seniors specializing in primary work. Consists of 
methods of teaching story plays, rhythm work, and 
games. 

Physical Education 4 — Teachers' Upper Grade Physical 
Education. 

Four hours, second semester. Two hours' credit. 
8:15, T, W, Th, F. Required of Standard Normal 
seniors specializing in upper grade work. Consists 
of methods of teaching pyhsical education and coach- 
ing more highly organized games. 

Physical Education 6 — Games. 

Four hours, first semester. Two hours' credit. 2:50, 
M, T, W, Th. Consists of teaching and training in 
basketball, volley ball, indoor baseball, and tennis. 

Physical Education 8 — Tennis. 

Four hours, fall, spring, and summer. One hour 
credit. Hours arranged. 

Physical Education 20 — Aesthetic Dancing. 

Four hours, first semester. Two hours' credit. 11:00, 
M, T, Th, F. For beginners. 

Physical Education 21 — Advanced Aesthetic Dancing. 

Four hours, second semester. Two hours' credit. 
11:00, M, T, Th, F. 

Physical Education 22 — Folk Dancing. 

Four hours, second semester. 9:15, M, T, Th, F. 
Two hours' credit. 

Physical Education 23 — Community Recreations. 

Four hours, first semester. Two hours' credit. 1:00, 
M, T, W, Th. A course for organizers of community 
recreation. Study of types of recreation suitable for 
home, church, school and larger community groups. 



86 Fairmont State Normal School 

Physical Education 24 — Corrective Work. 

Four hours, second semester. Two hours' credit. 
1:00, M, T, W, Th. Required on A.B. course. A 
study of the application of exercise to different phys- 
ical defects, such as drooping head, round shoulders, 
flat feet, etc. 

COURSES FOR MEN 

Physical Education 5— ^Gymnasium. 

Four hours, first semester. Two hours' credit. 10:05, 
M, T, W, F. Setting up exercises, applied gym- 
nasium, jumping exercises, running, walking, march- 
ing, vaulting; coordinating and corrective work. 

Physical Education 7 — Gymnasium. 

Four hours, second semester. Two hours' credit. 
10:05, M, T, W, F. Continuation of Physical Educa- 
tion 5, with more variety. 

Physical Education 25 — Group Games. 

Four hours, second semester. Two hours' credit. 
3:45, M, T, W, Th. Teaching of games for mass 
athletics, organization of teams for tennis, track, 
cross-country running, indoor track, wrestling, box- 
ing. 

SOCIOLOGY 

Mr. Lively, Miss Ice, Miss Prichard, Mr. Stewart. 

Sociology 1A — iSocial Relations. 

One hour, first semester. First section, 9:15, W; sec- 
ond section, 1:00, W. Required in Normal course. 
This course is a study of social customs and social 
problems. The material of this course is divided into 
two main groups of problems: first, discussion of 
theories and principles of social relations; second, 
studies of practical problems. — Miss Prichard. 






Fairmont State Normal School 87 

Sociology IB — Social Relations. 

One hour, second semester. First section, 9:15, W; 
second section, 1:00, W. A repetition of Sociology 
1A. — Miss Prichard. 

Sociology 2 — Rural (Sociology. 

Four hours, second semester. 10:05, M, T, W, F. This 
course is a treatment of such rural institutions as the 
church, the home, and the school. It discusses the 
rural, social and economic problems growing out of 
such topics as good roads, farm organizations, social 
life, recreation, isolation, religious life, education, 
with suggestions for their solution. Emphasis is 
placed upon educational agencies. — Miss Ice. 

Sociology 3A — Introduction to Sociology. 

Four hours, first semester. 10:05, M, T, W, F. This 
course is designed to give the student an intelligent 
understanding and a working system of thought 
about society and social origins. The elementary 
phases of the development of society, its institutions 
and working conditions are studied. Social control 
and social progress and the general relations of so- 
ciety to standards of authority. — Mr. Lively. 

Sociology 3B — Introduction to Sociology. 

Four hours, second semester. 10:05, M, T, W, F. A 
repetition of Sociology 3 A, with emphasis on the an- 
thropological aspects. — Mr. Lively. 

Sociology 20 — General Sociology. 

Four hours, second semester. 11:00, M, T, W, Th. 
The course in General Sociology is designed for more 
advanced students. The general applications of so- 
ciological concepts to human problems such as move- 
ments of population, general migrations, immigra- 
tion, poverty, crime, race prejudice, marriage, divorce, 
the family, feeble mindedness, the general patholog- 



88 Fairmont State Normal School 

ical problems of our social structure and the inter- 
dependence of modern society are discussed. — Mr. 
Lively. 

Sociology 21 — Educational Sociology. 

Three hours, second semester. 1:00, M, T, Th, F. 
Same as Education 25. See page 48. — Mr. Shreve. 

Sociology 22 — Immigration. 

Four hours, first semester. 1:55, M, T, W, Th. The 
aim of this course is to make plain the problem in 
American life presented by the incoming stream of 
immigration. A study of the causes' favoring the 
migration of peoples, and the results of such move- 
ments; special emphasis upon training for citizenship 
and the means of remedying the ills accompanying 
immigration movements. Prerequisite: Sociology 3. 
— Mr. Stewart. 

Sociology 23 — Social Problems of Labor. 

Four hours, second semester. 9:10, M, T, W, F. A 
study of the standards of living, social outlook and 
general attitude of the laboring class. Prerequisite: 
Sociology 3. — Mr. Lively. 

Sociology 24 — Crime and its Treatment. 

Four hours, first semester. 9:10, M, T, W, F. A 
study of the history and causes of crime, theories of 
punishment, modern prison systems and modern 
methods of dealing with the criminal. Prerequisite: 
Sociology 3. — Mr. Lively. 

Sociology 25S — Modern Social Movements and Progress. 

Eight hours, summer, four hours credit. A careful 
study of the workings of modern social institutions 
in relation to modern progress. Prerequisites: Soci- 
ology 3 and 20. — Mr. Lively. 



Fairmont State Normal School 89 

EXTENSION DEPARTMENT 

In addition to the two courses of study the Normal 
School supports an Extension Department. This has two 
principal purposes: to assist those who cannot enter 
school, especially teachers, to continue their studies out of 
school; and to help improve educational conditions 
throughout the northern part of West Virginia. A num- 
ber of different kinds of extension activities are carried 
on, among which are the following: 

1. Extension classes are organized among teachers 
and others who may he interested, and conducted by dif- 
ferent members of the faculty. Permission is also granted 
groups of students at a distance from the Normal School 
to form classes with a local leader as instructor. Stu- 
dents doing this kind of work are regularly enrolled and 
given credit for the actual amount of work done. (For 
details see page 35, VI, 2.) 

2. Persons who are unable to enroll at the school may 
take correspondence work. This work is in charge of dif- 
ferent members of the faculty and students and teachers 
may take it with profit. (See page 35, VII.) 

3. Members of the faculty of the Normal School, as 
far as possible, will accept invitations to assist in educa- 
tional meetings and district institutes, and they are also 
available for commencement addresses. School superin- 
tendents and Boards of Education are requested to write 
our Extension Department when they need the services 
of our faculty. It is expected that expenses and whenever 
possible, a small fee be paid for this service. 

4. Lecture Courses and entertainments are provided 
by the institution for the towns and school districts with- 
in its territory. These consist of lectures by members of 
the faculty, story-telling hours, readings, and musical pro- 
grams. Plans have also been made to organize and direct 
play festivals. 

5. The school will furnish judges for agricultural 
fairs and other similar exhibitions. 



90 Fairmont State Normal School 

6. Bulletins of educational interest are occasionally 
published. 

7. Information will be given on matters pertaining 
to the erection of school buildings, the purchasing of 
libraries, and the organization of schools. The Normal 
school, through its faculty, will be glad to serve the public 
schools in an advisory capacity. 

8. A Teachers' Employment Bureau is maintained 
for the purpose of securing positions for the graduates 
of the Normal School and for other teachers who may de- 
sire to enroll with the bureau. The institution finds that 
it can render a distinct service to teachers, superinten- 
dents and boards of education, through this bureau. All 
persons interested are requested to make use of it. 

9. Assistance is given in selecting suitable plays for 
high schools. 

The courses listed below and probably a few others 
will be given by correpondence during 1925-26. Tuition 

is at the rate of $5.00 per semester hour. 

Shreve — Ed. 6. Educational Psychology 4 hours 

Ed. 25. Educational Sociology 4 hours 

Hull — Ed. 3. Supervised Study 4 hours 

White — Ed. 6. School Management and School 

Hygiene 4 hours 

Opp— Eng. 3. Story Telling 2 hours 

Eng. 13. Recent Drama 2 hours 

Lewis — Eng. 8. Advanced Composition 3 hours 

Barnes — Eng. 11. Modern Poetry 2 hours 

Eng. 47. Teaching of High School 

English 2 hours 

Morrow — Eng. 24S. American Literature from 

1870 to 1900 2 hours 

Eng. 34. Literary Study of the Bible 4 hours 

Eng. 35. New Testament 3 hours 

Stewart — Hist. 21. Roman History 4 hours 



Fairmont State Normal School 91 

Prichard — Hist. 3. Modern European History 4 hours 
Hist. 22. Economic and Social His- 
tory of the United States 4 hours 

Ice — Soc. 2. Rural Sociology 4 hours 

Lively — Soc. 3. Introduction to General 

Sociology 4 hours 

Compton — Home Ec. 2. Practical Home Sewing 3 hours 

McCarty — Math. 2. Algebra 2 hours 

Math. 3. Plane Geometry 3 hours 

Math. 4. Plane Geometry 3 hours 

Math. 5. Solid Geometry 4 hours 

Rogers — Phys. Ed. 1. Physiology and Hygiene- 3 hours 

The Extension Department publishes a brief circular 
descriptive of its work. Those interested should write for 
the circular. All communications should be addressed to 
M. E. McCarty, Head of the Extension Department. 



92 Fairmont State Normal School 

PRIVATE MUSIC INSTRUCTION 

Miss Beltzhoover, Piano and Organ 
Miss Osborn, Voice 

The school is equipped with a number of upright 
pianos, which are available for practice and a Knabe 
grand piano which is used for concert work. Private re- 
citals are frequently given by the students, to which all 
members of the school will be admitted. Public recitals 
which are designed to give the students experience in pub- 
lic performance occur several times a year. 

Piano — The course of study in this department in- 
cludes : 

I. Finger exercises; major and minor scales; scales 
in double thirds; arpeggios in all forms. 

II. Studies by Berens, Bertini, Heller, Hasert. 

III. Sonatinas by Kublau and Clementine; sonatas 
by Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven. 

IV. Compositions by representative composers of all 
periods. 

Pipe Organ — The organ course is intended to provide 
a thorough and complete preparation for the work of a 
church organist and accompanist. 

A certain facility at the piano and in sight-reading 
is necessary before this work is taken up. 

Special studies, pedal studies and hymn playing com- 
prise the preparatory work, followed by the works of 
Rink, Buck, Dunham, Chadwick, Bach, Mendelssohn, 
Guilmant, Rheingeger, and comprise the groundwork of 
study through the course. 

Tuition — The tuition for a semester, payable in ad- 
vance is: 

Lessons per week 
One Two 

Piano $25.00 $50.00 

Organ 27.00 54.00 

Harmony (class of three) 15.00 30.00 

Theory (class of three) 15.00 30.00 

History of Music (class of 

three) 15.00 30.00 



Fairmont State Normal School 93 

VOCAL MUSIC 

Courses are offered in voice to students who have un- 
usual talent, or who wish to obtain correct ideas and 
habits concerning breathing, posture, voice placing, tone 
production, enunciation and articulation. Students will 
have opportunity to appear in concerts during the year. 

Tuition — The tuition for a semester, payable in ad- 
vance is: 

Lessons per week 
One Two 

Tuition $25.00 $50.00 



94 



Fairmont State Normal School 



ENROLLMENT 1924-1925 
COLLEGE SENIORS 



1st 2nd 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S.S. Sem. Sem. Sp. 

Bartlett, Christine Shinnston Harrison * 

Conn, Mary Louise Fairmont Marion 

Eib, Irene Eleanor ....BeMngton Barbour 

Feather, Ruth Fairmont Marion 

Furbee, Naomi Ruth ..Mannington Marion 

Gaskins, Catherine H...Monongah Marion 

Goode, Lula M Fairmont Marion 

Grose, Artha Morgan-Fairmont Marion 

Heinzman, Elizabeth ..New Martinsville.. ..Wetzel 

Hubbs, Sophia Cameron -Marshall 

Jenkins, Beryl ..Fairmont Marion 

Johnson, Ruth Fairmont Marion 

Noland, Velda Davis Tucker 

Oakes, Clarice Worthington Marion 

Richmond, Edna B Fairmont Marion 

Ross, Christine Grafton Taylor 

Swisher, Sylvia Monongah Marion 

Talbot, Ruby Philippi Taylor 

Weigand, Agnes B Millwood Mason * 

Whaley, Mary Mann... .Fairmont Marion 

Ammons, John W. D...Fairview Marion 

Bailey, Dallas C Shinnston Harrison _ 

Bramlett, James M Shinnston Harrison 

Burke, Alex Hundred Wetzel * 

Carmichael, H. E Fairmont Marion * 

Cole, Dale Farmington Marion 

Conaway, Harrison ....Fairmont Marion * 

Dprr, Charles P Morgantown Monongalia * 

Duncan, Harlan L Mannington Marion * 

Fisher', Herbert H Fairmont Marion 

Fleming, Harold D Farmington Marion 

Griffin, Loy E Wyatt Harrison 

Kuhn, Ernest Guy Farmington Marion 

Malick, Clay Packer ....Fairmont Marion 

Milam, Otis H BarrackviUe Marion 

Miller, Edgar O'Dell ....Blacksvil'le Monongalia • 

Roger, Harold F Moundsville Marshall 

Turner, Roy W Hundred Wetzel * 

Whaley, William C Fairmont Marion 

White, Chester Ross....Kingwood Preston * 

Wright, Bernard Fairmont Marion 



Fairmont State Normal School 



95 



1st 
Sem. 



2nd 
Sem. Sp. 



COLLEGE JUNIORS 

name post office county S.S. 

Ammons, Bessie Fairview Marion 

Araett, Neva C Fairmont Marion 

Ball, Leta M Maggie Mason 

Bartlett, Erma Hazel ..Fairmont Marion * 

Banfield, Ruth Fairmont Marion 

BiMingslea, Mary R Fairmont Marion 

Blocher, Georgia Fairmont Marion * 

Bice, Rhoda E Fairmont Marion * 

Boggess, Pauline R Fairmont Marion * 

Boyer, Themua May ....Fairmont Marion 

Byer, Eunice Fairmont ....Marion * 

Brandenburg, Mabel ....BeMngton Barbour 

Bucy, Pauline Fairmont Marion 

Casey, Irene Weston Lewis 

Clayton, Alta L. PulLman Ritchie 

Clelland, Allene D Grafton Taylor 

Cobun, Eleanor Fairmont Marion 

Cochran, Jessie B Grafton Taylor 

Connelly, Etta Mae ....Mannington Marion 

Cook, Nellie Haywood Harrison 

Crane, Beatrice Maud Wetzel 

Crawford, Annie L Williamson Mingo 

Creighton, Mary Fairmont _ Marion 

Cunningham, Esta Shinnston Harrison 

Cunningham, Mabel ....St. Marys Pleasant 

Davis, Irene -.Fairmont Marion 

Downs, Pearl Farmington Marion 

Duncan, Edna J -Mannington Marion 

Evans, Olive WaJIace..Fairmont Marion 

Evans, Lucille Clarksburg Harrison 

Ferguson, Ruth Fairmont Marion 

Fraziei 4 , Mary Fairmont Marion 

Freeiand, Thelma Fairmont Marion 

Frum, Alice Lowe ShLiunston Harrison 

Funt, Esther I Fairmont Marion 

Gaskill, Madaline Fairmont Marion 

Gillespie, Eleanor Fairmont Marion 

Gillespie, Pauline Sutton Braxton 

Hall, Eva Gertrude ....Fairmont Marion * 

Hamilton, W. Lueille....Fairmont Marion * 

Hawkins, Nettie Maud Rivesville Marion * 

Hoover, Myra Mabel ....Fairmont Marion 

Hornor, Irene „ Fairmont Marion _ 

Herndon, Viola E. ....Montcalm .Mercer * 

Hess, Edythe M Worthington Marion * 

Hibbs, Sarah Fairmont Marion * 



96 



Fairmont State Normal School 



NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S 

Hubbs, Georgie Glen Easton Marshall 

Huey, Dollie Lee Mannington -Marion 

Hull, Mary L Fairmont Marion 

Henry, Blanche Jean.. Fairmont Marion 

Ice, Edith M Fairmont Marion 

Ice. Lula Virginia ....Clarksburg Harrison 

Jenkins, Lula M Terra Alta Preston 

Judge, Lucy Pine Grove Wetzel 

Maple, Mildred Fairmont Marion 

Masters, Margaret M.Littleton Wetzel 

Matthew, Grace Independence Preston 

McCormick, Vera Cameron Marshall 

McElfresh, Blanche E. Fairmont Marion 

McGuffie, Ottey G Littleton Wetzel 

McKay, Dorothy L. .... Fairmont _ ....Marion 

McKinley, Wanda I Weston Lewis 

McPherson, Mary Burnsville Braxton 

Menear, Augusta Fairmont Marion 

Miller, Margaret L Fairmont Marion 

Monroe, Neva Mannington Marion 

Musgrove, Winnie Fairmont Marion 

Park, Marjorie Farmington Marion 

Page, Laura Williamstown Wood 

Parrish, Edna Fairview Marion 

Post, Mary Elizabeth....Kincheloe Harrison 

Potter, Grace D Fairmont Marion 

Rector, Hazel SHinnston Harrison 

Rector, Winnie SHinnston Harrison 

Rader, Esther Kirkwood Nicholas 

Reese, Madge Fairmont Marion 

Righter, Mary E Shinnston Harrison 

Rhodes, Nettie MorganFairmont Marion 

Robinson, Arsel C Littleton Wetzel 

Robinson, Virginia E. Monongah Marion 

Robinson, Margaret ....Monongah ....Marion 

Ross, Ruth B ..Fairmont Marion 

Ryan, Helen Fairmont Marion 

Petres, Anna Mannington Marion 

Philipps, Olive V Blacksville Monongalia 

Shaw, Sadie Colfax Marion 

Sine, Hazeltine Blacksville Monongalia 

Slater, Sue Mannington Marion 

Snedegar, Delphia A...Marlin,ton Pocahontas 

Snider, LuJla Fairmont Marion 

Springer, Mary LucilleFairmont Marion 

Stoneking, May Bell ....Fairmont Marion 

Stewart, Agnes K Morgantown Monongalia 

Straight, Nellie Grant Town Marion 



1st 
Sem, 



2nd 
Sem. Sp. 



Fairmont State Normal School 97 

1st 2nd 

NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S.S. Sem. Sem. Sp. 

Taylor, Stella B Willflamson Mingo * * * 

Teimant, Nell .....Rivesville Marion * 

Thompson, Lucretia ....Shinnston Harrison * 

Thrasher, Theima A...Wi!lsonburg Harrison * 

Tyer, Ethel Mary Beatrice Ritchie * 

Watkins, Gladys M Hoult Marion * 

White, Grace Grafton Taylor * 

Wilson, Clara _ Fairmont Marion * * * 

Yost, Mae Fairmont Marion * * 

Wilderman, Ruth Falirmont Marion * 

Bartlett, Lucile N Fairmont Marion * 

Goddin, Winnie S Elkins Randolph * 

Arnett, H. Ivanhoe ....Rivesvillle Marion * * 

Cox, F. Walter Fairmont Marion * 

Cole, John W Adamston Harrison * 

Criss, William J Watson Marion * * 

Danser, Charles F Tunnelton ....Preston * 

Daily, Adair L Terra Atta Preston * 

Dingess, Lesley L Fairmont) Marion * * * 

Hall, Edward C Morgantown Monongalia * * 

Hess, Scott .Cowen Webster * 

Hawkins, Joseph AllenWardensville _Hardy * 

Hunt, E. A Luniberport Harrison * * * 

Joy, Frank D Fairmont Marion * * 

Kyle, Oliver Rufus EJtoins Randolph • 

Furbee, Jack .Terra Alta Preston * 

Linger, Mandeville S. Baxter Marion * * 

Marshall, J. R. BarrackviHe Marion * 

Martin, Chester Shinnston Harrison _ * 

Mason, Cecil „ Wadestown Monongalia * '* * 

Martin, Herman Fairmont Marion * * 

Martin, Edgar Blair ....Shinnston Harrison * * 

McQuain, Adam ..._ Orlando Lewis * • 

Mick, J. Earl Weston Lewis * 

Park, Chester Farmdngton Marion * * 

Queen, H. M Grafton Taylor * 

Righter, Charles L Shinnston Harrison * 

Rider, P. MeKord Rivesville ...„ Marion * 

Ross, Clarence Young Fairmont Marion * 

Sharp, H. Sutton Fairmont Marion * * 

Sqirires, Fay ...Fairmont Marion ..._ * * 

Snodgrass, John F Mannington Marion * * 

White, Simon L. Hundred Wetzel * 



Fairmont State Normal School 



2nd 
Sem. Sp. 



COLLEGE SOPHOMORES 

1st 
* NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S.S. Sem. 

Barcus, Pauline Fairmont Marion 

Boggess, Mary Fairmont Marion 

Currey, Mildred L Fairmont Marion 

Davis, Charlana Fairmont Marion 

Fisher, Helen F Flatwoods Braxton 

Howard, Sylvia Ross.... Clarksburg Harrison 

Hutchinson, Helen F...Ravenswood Jackson 

Koon, Mabel Watson Marion 

Potter, Ruth M Fairmont Marion 

Robey, Lelia Baxter Marion 

Rosier, Mary Jo Fairmont Marion 

Snider, Irene Fairmont Marion 

Toivonen, Pearl A Hancock, Mich * 

Yost, Ann Fairmont Marion 

Zinn, Hazel May Grafton Taylor * 

Yost, Jane Fairmont Marion * 



Balderson, Walter L... Fairmont Marion 

Barbers, George -...Fairmont Marion 

Brock, Clarence A Fairmont Marion 

Craig. George Fairmont Marion 

Davis, Rufus Furman Hammond Harrison 

Elbin, Paul Cameron Marshall 

Hinkle, Walton Fairmont Marion 

Hunt, Garald John ....Hundred -Wetzel 

Jones, Carter Fairmont Marion * 

Keri*. Clarence Henry..Pennsboro Ritchie 

Leeper, Harry ThomasMonongah „... Marion 

McKain, Charles J Monongah Marion * 

Michael, Newton G FairvieW Marion 

Miller, Oliver J Fairmont Marion 

Nealy, Alfred Fairmont Marion * 

Parks, Carleton Fairmont Marion 

Putnam, Alfred R Fairmont Marion 

Rinehart, Burrell W...Ciarksburg Harrison 

Sharps, A. B Lumberport Harrison 

Snodgrasa, Dale S Mannington Marion 

Meadows, Boss W Beckley Raleigh 

McCray, Edward C Fairmont Marion 

Tennant, D. S BlacksvOle Monongalia 

Watson, Robert L. Fairmont Marion * 

Whoolery, Kenneth Fairmont Marion 

Wright, Harry Alfred. JUatoaka Mercer 



Fairmont State Normal School 99 

COLLEGE FRESHMEN 

1st 2nd 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY .SS. Sem. Sem. Sp. 

Barfclett, Marie C Gassaway Braxton * * 

Billingham, Flora L Fairmont Marion * 

Bird, Eva Grace Barrackville Marion * 

Clelland, Willa Irene..Fairmont Marion * 

Conaway, Leila Grace_Mannington Marion * 

Cunningham, Jane Fairmont Marion * 

Currey, Gladys Monongah Marion * * 

Davis, Mildred Merle ..Baxter Marion * * 

Bickerson, Martha V...Fairmont Marion * 

Dotson, Calora F Fairmont Marion * * 

Fishback, Gail Fairmont Marion * 

Fishback, Mary Fairmont Marion * 

Gilhard, Pauline Fairmont Marion * 

Goodwin, Mildred C Shinnston ..._ Harrison * 

Hann, Louise Bennett..Fairmont Marion * * 

Harden, Florence E. ..Fairmont Marion * * 

Hess, Lily Helen Mannington Marion * 

Jamison, Colna M Morgantown Monongalia * 

Kaznoski, Mamie Barrackville Marion * * 

Kline, Meredith W Fairmont Marion 

Knight, Elizabeth Fairmont Marion * * 

Knight, Margaret B...Fairmont Marion * * 

Layman, Mrs. C. H Fairmont Marion * 

Layman, Ellen Mae ....Fairmont Marion * 

Mason, Sarah Irene ....Clarksburg Harrison * 

McManess, Marie A Fairmont Marion * 

Miller, Mary Virginia..Grafton Taylor * * 

Morgan, Virginia Clarksburg Harrison * * 

Nuzum, Reamous Fairmont Marion * 

Peddicord, Virginia F.Fairmont Marion * 

Robinson, Blanche Clarksburg Harrison * * 

Robinson, Christine ....Mannington Marion * * * 

Robinson, Mildred V... Fairmont Marion * 

Rogers, Lulu S Fairmont Marion * 

Shoemaker, Naomi P.. .Watson Marion * 

Sine, Annie Laurie ....Blacksville Monongalia * * 

Staggers, Laura F Fairmont -...Marion * 

Tulin, Gladys May Monongah Marion * * 

Vanzandt, Kathleen ....Mannington Marion * * 

Watkins, Wilma C.....Shinnston Harrison * * * 

Abbott, Clarence K Fairmont Marion * * 

Abruzzino, James A._Shinnston Harrison * 

Ammons, John Glen....Fa)irview Marion * * 

Ashby, Keith W Fairmont Marion * * 

Baker, Wilbur Fairmont Marion * * 

Barb, Carl Fairmont Marion * * 



100 



Fairmont State Normal School 



NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY 

Beall, Clarence F. Barrackville Marion 

Battinger, Wayne Fairmont Marion 

Beaty, John Newton ....Mannington Marion * 

Boyers, Frank W Fairmont Marion 

Brown, Joe Fairmont Marion 

Burns, John Edwin ....Fairmont Marion 

Anwyll, Joseph Fairmont Marion 

Burr-el}, Matthew Fairmont Marion 

Callahan, John R Fairmont Marion 

Callahan, Samuel W Fairmont Marion 

Connell, Thomas J Fairmont Marion 

Carroll, Bain E .Morgambown Monongalia 

Crowd, Robert B Fairmont Marion 

Clayton, Howard R Fairmont Marion 

Cunningham, H. G Fairmont Marion 

Elder, Jasper Fairmont Marion 

Evans, William Dent.. ..Fairmont Marion 

Fetty, Harry F Fairmont Marion 

Fink, Logan Oscar ....Fairmont Marion 

Fleming, Eugene B Fairmont Marion 

Fuller, Albert J Fairmont Marion 

Furbee, Franklin D Grafton Taylor 

Harr, Surs Frederick-Fairmont Marion 

Hatzel, Wilbur Farmington Marion 

Frum, Allison Buster ..Fairmont Marion * 

Hawkins, Richard L...Fairmont Marion 

Hawkins, William B Fairmont Marion 

Hayhurst, Robert Fairmont Marion 

Hefner, Paul Moore ....Grafton Taylor 

Henry, John Herbert ..Grafton Taylor 

Henry, Percy Byron ....Fairmont Marion 

Hickman, Clyde T Grafton Taylor 

Hirsh, Leone S Fairmont Marion 

Hough, Edwin Fairmont Marion 

Hoult, Charles Fairmont Marion 

Jarrett, Charles Kingmont Marion 

Keighron, Eugene L...Morgantown Monongalia 

Keener, Ralph E Fairmont Marion 

Kisner, John Fairmont Marion 

Knight, James FarrelI..Fairmonit Marion 

Layman, Charles -Fairmont Marion 

Lucas, Van Shinnston Harrison 

Lee, Russell Tyree Clarksburg Harrison _ * 

Maloney, Robert Jr. ..Grafton Taylor 

Martin, Gilbert A Watson Marion 

Michael, Horace Fairviiew Marion 

Michael, James Roy ....Mannington Marion 

MiHan, Glenn L Worthington Marion 



1st 
S.S. Sem. 



2nd 
Sem. Sp. 



Fairmont State Normal School 101 

1st 2nd 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S.S. Sem. Sem. Sp. 

Miller, George Jr Fairview Marion 

Moosy, G. T Monongah Marion 

Morgan, Ernest Fairmont Marion 

Morgan, Oliver Perry-Fairmont Marion 

Nutter, Jackson Fairmont Marion 

Ogden, Herbert LelandFairmont Marion 

Opp, Carl Joseph Forest, Ohio 

Parker, John L Rivesville Marion 

Parrish, Richard B Fairmont Marion 

Patterson, Ralph BoydFairmont Marion 

Pierce, Jay Harold Fairmont Marion 

Prendergast, Michael! EFairmont Marion 

Reed, Harris Fairmont Marion 

Ridgway, Richard D. ..Barrackville Marion 

Robey, Howard Manniington Marion 

Ross, Joseph Fairmont Marion 

Riheldaffer, William H.Fairmont Marion * 

RothMsberger, Edward Fairmont Marion 

Rouand, Ephain Fairmont Marion 

Shaw, George Richard.. Grafton Taylor 

Sherwood, Paul M Fairmont Marion * 

Shields, George Jr Fairmont Marion 

Samples, William Grafton Taylor 

Sloan, Robert Fairmont Marion 

Straight, Dennis Ray..Fairview Marion 

Tennant, Charles Blacksville Monongalia 

Tennant, Raymond Barrackville Marion 

Thomas, Beryl Fairmont Marion 

Watson, Albert Fairmont Marion * 

Vennari, Joseph Lumberport Harrison * 

Whiteman, Lester JackShinnston Harrison 

Winter, Harry Charleston -Kanawha 

Wilson, Fay William ..Fairmont Marion 

Wolfe, Darwin Grafton Taylor 

Worley, William Fairmont Marion 

SENIOR NORMAL 

Allen, Beatrice M Fairmont Marion 

Ammons, Nellie Opal-Mann ington Marion * 

Arnold, Nellie B Weston Lewis * 

Bailey, Eva Weston Lewis 

Basnett, Irene Snider..Mannington Marion * 

Barney, Vasti Wardensville Hardy * 

Bartlett, Corrinnie Barrackville Marion * 

Beck, Anna Sophia ....Weston Lewis 

Barnes, Doris Eugenia Fairmont Marion 

Bennett, Beulah Irene Grafton Taylor * 



102 Fairmont State Normal School 



1st 2nd 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S.S. Sem. Sem. Sp. 

Bennett, Ethel Webster Springs ....Webster * 

Boyers, Naomi B Fairmont Marion * 

Bollman, Nerissa E Mannington Marion * 

Bigler, Mildred Clara ..Cowen Webster * 

Bovver, Mary K Shinnston Harrison * 

Brand, Sybil Louvena..Rachel Marion * 

Brown, Nell .Fairmont Marion * 

Brownfield, Amelia ....Fairview Marion * * 

Brook, Virginia Fairmont Marion * 

Bryant, Mary G Fairmont Marion * 

Burge, Mabel M Parkersburg Wood * 

Burns, Mary Virginia..Terra Alta Preston * 

Carlisle, Mildred Williamstown Wood * * 

Cather, Opha P Grafton Taylor * * * 

Caudy, Lucille _ Qamden-on-Gauley.. Webster * * 

Chalfant, Sarah M Fairview Marion * * 

Chaplin, Virginia E..Morgantown Monongalia * 

Childs, Margaret RuthFairmont Marion * * 

Clark, Mrs. Helen Morgantown Monongalia * * 

Clayton, Willard Fairmont Marion * * 

Butcher, Ina Fairmont Marion * 

Conner, Mary C McMechen Marshall * 

Cordray, Martha RuthMorgantown Monongalia * 

Core, Elsie Lee Masontown Preston * 

Cowan, Ida M Fairview Marion * * 

Cougill, Leone Parker Randolph * 

Copenhaver, Coralee ....Wallace . Harrison * 

Cander, Orpha Sutton Braxton * 

Davis, Helen Kathryu-.Fairmont Marion * * 

Davis, Martha Gene ....Hammond Marion * * * 

Davis, Mrs. Pauline ....Fairmont Marion * * 

Deason, Hazel Browne..Belington Barbour * 

DeGant, Stella C Wheeling Ohio * 

Devine, Lela Hundred Wetzel * 

DeVoe, Anna Jane ....Fairmont Marion * * 

DeMoss, Ada Esta Grafton .Taylor * 

Dietz, Opal Moundsville Marshall * * 

Dorr, Mrs. Charles Morgantown Monongalia * 

Dotson, Mrs. Mary E...Fairmont Marion * * 

Dragoo, Louise Fairmont Marion * * 

Dye, Gertrude E Fairmont Marion * * 

Edmondson, Harriette..Morgantown Monongalia * * 

Eib, Virginia Belington Barbour * * 

Engle, Ethel Louise ...Middlebourne Tyler * 

Finley, Mrs. Helen ....Fairmont Marion * * 

Fleming, Martha M Fairmont Marion * * 

Fletcher, Virginia L...Fairmont Marion * * * 

Floyd, Mrs. Ralph Mannington Marion * 



Fairmont State Normal School 



103 



NAME 



Sp. 



1st 2nd 
POST OFFICE COUNTY S.S. Sem. Sem. 

Forbes, Margaret Morgantown Monongalia * 

Fallon, Dorothy B Elkins Randolph 

Frame, Mabel Irene....Gassaway Braxton 

Franklin, Alice E Mannington Marion 

Frazier, Elva V -Wheeling Ohio 

Gall, Elsie May Philippi Barbour 

Gibson, Ila Kathryn ....Grafton Taylor „.... 

Glover, Nancy Ann ....Glover Gap Marion 

Griffin, Nellfie M Wyatt Harrison 

Haley, Orpha Hepzibah Harrison 

Hall, Iva Gladys Wallace Harrison 

Hamrick, Jean N Hamrick Harrison 

Haines, Pansy Gladys Bruceton Mills Preston 

Hanley, Frances E Benwood Marshall 

Hartley, Goldie Fairmont Marion 

Hamilton, Freda Hundred Wetzel 

Haught, Stella Fairview Marion 

Dragoo, Mrs. Rilla H...New Martinsville ..Wetzel 

Hawkins, Lola Gay ....Fairmont Marion 

Hayhurst, Jemima E...Colfax Marion 

Hess, Rel'la jFarmington Marion 

Heater, Magdaline Dawmont .Harrison 

Hefner, Freda Jean ....Weston Lewis 

Heltzel, Alma Wardensville Hardy 

Hemman, Helen Wheeling Ohio 

Henderson, Mildred ....Grafton Taylor 

Hess, Pearl Floyd Mannington Marion 

Hinerman. Doris Cameron -Marshall 

Hickman, Beatrice Ripley Jackson * * 

Higinbotham, MargaretShinnston Harrison * 

Himmelrick, JosephineBurton Wetzel * 

Hines, Genevieve Webster Webster * 

Holt, Mrs. Edith C.Shinnston .Harrison 

Holland, Bernice Mannington Marion 

Hudkins, Lucile L -Salem Harrison 

Huey, Thelma Jean ....Mannington Marion 

Huff, Gertrude Ann ....Akeley* Warren 

Hughes, Mary M Fairmont Marion 

Hutchinson, Esther E...Ravenswood Jackson 

Hunsaker, Alma G Fairmont Marion 

Ice, Mary Ellen Fairmont Marion 

Ice, Delice M Sistersville Tyler 

Iden, Josie Mary Davis Tucker 

Inghram, Elizabeth ....Fairview Marion 

Jenkins, Lula MerrilL.Terra Alta Preston 

Johnson, Olive F Clarksburg Harrison 

Goff, Ova Mary Newburg Preston 

Johnston, Alice Agnes.. Hundred Wetzel 



104 Fairmont State Normal School 

1st 2nd 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S.S. Sem. Sem. Sp. 

Jones, Kathryn Fairmont Marion * * 

Jones, Nell Weston Lewis * * 

Jones, Winifred Fairmont Marion * 

Goodwin, Rena Stone..Grafton Taylor * 

Joyce, Irene Four States Marion * 

Keener, Opal Leah Fairmont Marion * * 

Kelly, Eunice Grafton Taylor * 

Keller, Ruth M Ravenswood Jackson * 

Kerns, Frances D Smithfield Wetzel * 

Kessell, Faith Ripley Jackson „ * 

Kessell, Zorah D Ripley Jackson _ * 

Kimble, Gladys Littleton Wetzel * * 

Knight, Rebecca Clarksburg -Harrison * 

Leppert, Louise Ravenswood Jackson * * 

Little, Elma Mae .Clarksburg Harrison * * 

Little, Pauline .Clarksburg Harrison * 

Linger, March Roanoke Lewis * * 

Lunsford, Nelle .Weston Lewis * * * 

Martins, Mrs. Emzie ....Shinnston Harrison * 

Martin, Genevieve Fairmont .....Marion * * 

Marple, Janie Flatwoods Braxton * 

MacNary, Mildred Clarksburg Harrison * * 

Manear, Velva L Fairmont Marion * 

Malatte, Virginia B. ..Fairmont Marion * 

Marsh, Angela Parkersburg Wood * 

Marsh, Elizabeth Parkersburg Wood * * * 

Mayers, Elizabeth Fairmont Marion * * * 

Mayne, Alma Enterprise Harrison * * 

Mayfield, Louise Middlebourtie Tyler * * 

Mayyou, Mildred Reedsville Preston * 

McClure, Irene V Morgantown Monongalia * 

McLaughlin, Mrs. FredMarlinton Pocahontas * 

McMillen, Edna G Masontown Preston * 

McQueen, Esther Fairmont Marion * * 

Merrifield, Nedra M...Fairmont Marion * 

Meredith, Hazel LouiseMeadowbrook Harrison * 

Michaels, Eva Mannington Marion * 

Mitchell, Magdalena ....Elm Grove Ohio * 

Morgan, Mattie R Fairmont Marion * * 

Morgan, Naomi F Morgantown Monongalia * * 

Monroe, Janice Clarksburg Harrison * * 

Moore, Josephine L Mannington ....Marion * * * 

Moore, Dorothy Fairmont Marion * 

Mramor, Marjorie Davis Tucker * 

Murphy, Irene „_Morgantown Monongalia * 

Ney, Florence Fairmont Marion * * 

Noland, Erra Enid ....Davis Tucker * 

NewQon, Madge NaomiSimpson Taylor * 



Fairmont State Normal School 105 

1st 2nd 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S.S. Sem. Sem. Sp. 

O'Dea, Genevieve Littleton Wetzel * 

O'Dell, Mrs. ElizabethFairmont Marion * 

Ochletree, Katharine ..Weston Lewis * 

Orr, Lenore Berry Wyatt Harrison * 

Parsons, Flora Jane ....Ripley * 

Parsons, Indianola Proctor Wetzel * * 

Parrish, Helen Effie ....Grafton Taylor * 

Peek, Pearl Naomi Richwood Nicholas * 

Pendergast, Margaret-Littleton Wetzel * 

Peterson, Gertrude Weston Lewis * * 

Phillips, Lois Rivesville, Marion * * 

Pierce, Mildred Jane ..Middlebourne Tyler * 

Plant, Mabel Robey ....Lumberport Harrison * 

Plotts, Wima Estella -Chester Hancock * 

Poling, Bertha Fairmont Marion * * 

Post, Mary Frances ....Fairmont Marion * 

Powell, Cecyle M Bilacksville Monongalia * 

Price, Emma Beulah ..Mannington Marion * 

Prichard, Ocea Fairmont Marion * * 

Pryan, Audrey Cowen Webster * 

Pryan, Eula Skyles Webster * 

Pyles, Ethel Fairview Marion * 

Rader, Esther Hookersville Nicholas * 

Rannenberg, Hazel M. Fairmont Marion * 

Reed, Ethel Virginia ..Watson Marion * * 

Reed, Louise Esabelle..Boothsville Marion * 

Reeder, Anna Lillian.. ..Morgantown Monongalia * * 

Richards, Ethel V Fairmont Marion * 

Riggs, Edna TheodosiaCameron Marshall * * 

Robinson, Esther Wilsonburg Harrison * * 

Robinson, Mildred E...Shinnston Harrison * 

Robinson, Pauline S Shinnston Harrison * 

Rudy, Madeline Rachel Marion * * 

Satterfield, Martha P...Fairmont Marion * * 

Scott, Jean Sands Fairmont Marion * * 

Shaver, Charlotte Fairmont Marion * * 

Rushford, Charlotte ....New Martinsville -Wetzel * 

Scott, Mrs. Ruth H Grafton Taylor * 

Sharps, Hazel Bretz Preston * 

Skiles, Ada Frances ....Sabraton Monongalia * * 

Rymer, Olive Craig ....Mannington Marion * 

Slepesky, Anna Jo ....Fairmont Marion * * 

Smith, Lois Marion ....Newburg Preston * 

Smith, Thelma M Nutter Fort Harrison * 

Smith, R. Pearl Fairmont Marion * 

Smith, Zoe E Fairmont Marion * * 

Smyth, Mildred Lee ....Morgantown Monongalia * 

Snider, Vivian Moore ..Grafton Taylor * 



106 Fairmont State Normal School 

1st 2nd 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S.S. Sem. Sem. 

Snodgrass, Gypsy J Smithfield Wetzel * 

Snodgrass, Pearl Mannington Marion 

Spurgeon, Lulu M. Morgantown Monongalia * 

Straight, Hazel Grant Town Marion * 

Stanley,, Margaret B._Fairmont Marion * 

Starkey, Bertha .....Smithfield .Wetzel * 

Starkey, Edna Violet ..Mannington Marion * 

Strimmel, Julia C Point Maroin, Pa... * 

Studivan, Rose Orndorff Webster 

Sturm, Jessie Clarksburg Harrison * 

Stalnaker, Pearl Weston Lewis 

Sybert, Helen Miller ....Mannington Marion * 

Summers, Anna Mae....Belington Barbour * 

Swisher, Jettie June.... Catawba Marion 

Taylor, Reland Fairmont Marion * * 

Thompson, Edith Weirton Hancock * 

Tucker, Mary Frances.-Morgantown Monongalia * 

Tuttle, Opal Edna New Martinsville ..Wetzel 

Van Gilder, Mrs Zoe....Fairmont Marion * 

Webb, Gertrude M Fairmont Marion * 

Wagner, Faye F. Ravenswood Jackson 

Wilson, Valda Fairmont Marion * 

Wotring, Leola Morgantown Monongalia * 

Wright, Hilda Newburg Preston 

Wright, Tessie Newburg Preston 

Williams, Martha H. ..Morgantown Monongalia 

Wright, Edna Newburg Preston * 

Yeager, Edna Mannington Marion * 

Yoho, Flossie G Howard Marshall * 

Anderson, Robert E Rowlesburg Preston 

Armstrong, Bryan Independence Taylor * 

Bane, Frank J Wadestown Monongalia 

Bennett, Fred Webster Springs ...-Webster 

Brown, Hugh W Lumberport Harrison * 

Brown, Wayman Lumberport Harrison 

Criss, Robert Edward..Watson Marion * 

Cale, Claude Terra Alta Preston * 

Cole, John W Hepzibah Harrison * 

Cubbon, Kenneth E Lumberport Harrison * 

Cubbon, Claude Lumberport Harrison 

Duffield, Vaughn H Burnsville Braxton * 

Eastman, Lyle Mannington Marion * 

Fortney, Hugh Lumberport Harrison * 

Goddin, Elmer Elkins Randolph * 

Gumm, Boyce L Frametown Preston * 

Harbert, Richard E Dola Harrison 

Johnson, Audrie Fairmont Marion * 



Fairmont State Normal School 107 

1st 2nd 
NAME} POST OFFICE COUNTY S.S. Sem. Sem. Sp. 

Johnson, J. Dale Shinnston Harrison * 

Linger, Mandeville ....Caior Ritchie * 

McKain, Charles J Monongah Marion * 

Little, Charles Leon ....Bridgeport Taylor * 

Morrison, Lewis F Morgantown Monongalia * 

Hale, Edward Everett..Fairmont Marion 

Harris, Samuel Fairmont Marion 

Ice, Ben H Mannington Marion 

Merrifield, Amos A Shinnston Harrison 

O'Donnell, Earl V Parkersburg Wood * 

Pigott, Byrd Mannington Marion 

Robert, Odgar Hundred Wetzel * 

Robinson, Fred B .Grafton Taylor 1 * 

Rogers, Fred S .Independence Preston * 

Rohrbouigh, Virgil Weston Lewis 

Rush, William E Eamshaw Wetzel * 

Smith, Rex Fairmont Marion 

Scott, Raymond Smithfield Wetzel * 

Skinner, Minter P Gassaway Braxton * 

Snodgrass, John F Mannington Marion * 

Snider, Otis Ralph Watson Marion 

Stiles, Donley L Wadestown -Monongalia * 

Willis, Mitchell E Shinnston Harrison * 

Wilson, D. E Fairview Marion 

Yoho, Audrey Verl Silver Hill Wetzel 

Zirkle, Burman B Brown Harrison 

JUNIOR NORMAL 



Adams, Freda Marie.... (Ohio) * 

Addison, Carrie Maye.-Morgantown Monongalia * 

Allen, Luvenia ..Hundred Wetzel * 

Allen, Sadie Wallace Harrison * 

Anderson, Mrs. BeulahShinnston Harrison * 

Arnett, Grace Mannington Marion * 

ArOnson, LilTie Davis Tucker 

Ashcraft, Maybelle M. Worthington Marion * 

Athey, Mildred G Parkersburg Wood * 

Azelvandre, E. LouiseClarksburg Harrison 

Baker, Edythe BlancheFairmont Marion 

Baker, Eva Mae Fairmont Marion 

Balderson, Estyl Fairmont Marion * 

Barnes, Doris Fairmont Marion * 

Barker, Carl O Shinnston Harrison 

Barker, Harold Mannington Marion 

Barnes, Anna BlancheMeadowbrook Harrison * 

Barrett, Hazel Irene....St. Marys Pleasants * 

Bartlett, Monna S Volga Barbour * 



108 Fairmont State Normal School 

1st 2nd 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S.S. Sem. Sem. Sp. 

Bassel, Virginia Mt. Clare Harrison * 

Bayles, Lillian F Pisgah Preston * 

Beavers, Dana Kingwood -....Preston * 

Beck, Anna Sophia Weston Lewis * 

Becker, Twila C Fairmont Marion * * 

Beebe, Geraldine Morgantown Monongalia * 

Blaney, Harriett K Grafton Taylor * 

Bennett, Margie -Franklin Pendleton * 

Berry, Meryl Evelyn ....Fairmont Marion * 

Best, Irene Cameron Marshall * 

Birkemir, Iva Mae ....St. Marys Pleasant * 

Bonnell, Jesse A Smithfield Wetzel * 

Bond, Mary Louise ....Albright Preston * 

Bond, Virginia LouiseFairmont Marion * 

Boore, Lelia Carrol ....Grant Town Marion * * 

Boor, Christine Farmington Marion * * 

Boor, Naomi V Fairmont Marion * 

Bowermaster, Mary E. Bruceton Mills Preston * * 

Bright, Eleanor V Elkins Randolph * * 

Bennett, Ocie Monongah Marion * 

Berger, Carrie F Clarksburg Harrison * 

Bock, Bessie Farmington Marion * 

Briggs, Mrs. Delia H... Terra Alta Preston * 

Bunner, Barbara B Fairmont Marion * * 

Bunner, Myrtle H Fairmont Marion * * 

Bunner, Pauline OpaL.Williamstown Wood * * * 

Burkhast, Gladys K Fairmont Marion * 

Boylan, DorotKea Newburg Preston * 

Brown, Edna Four States Marion * 

Burnside, Mary Fairmont Marion * 

Bowers, Henrietta Lumiberport Harrison * 

Brandenburg, Marie ....Belington Barbour * 

Brown, Catherine Elkins Randolph * 

Brown, Pauline Weston Lewis * 

Brumage, Ina Smithfield Weston * 

Brumble, Fannie D Fairmont Marion * 

Burbridge, Mabel V. ..Salem Doddridge * 

Butcher, Genevieve M...Jane Lew Lewis * 

Byard, Mildred Glover Gap Marion * 

Cain, Kathryn Belington Barbour * * * 

Calvert, Sylpha M Mannington Marion * 

Campbell, Beryl Mannington Marion * 

Carlin, Mary Alma ....Folsom Wetzel * 

Carpenter, Virginia ....Weston -Lewis * 

Caten, Frances Neola.-Cameron Marshall * 

Cather, Margaret Grafton Taylor * 

Chaney, Joseph Watson Marion * 

Chaney, Regina Fairmont Marion * * 



Fairmont State Normal School 109 

1st 2nd 

NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S.S. Sem. Sem. Sp. 

Channell, Edna Elkins Randolph * 

Chennoweth, Kate Sandyville Jackson * 

Church, Archie Glover Gap Wetzel * * 

Church, Mary Hundred Wetzel * 

Click, Mary Jean Ravenswood Jackson * * * 

Clark, Catherine Marlinton Pocahontas * 

Cobb, Bonnie Belle Mercer's Bottom ....Mason * 

Clendenin, Charles E...Grafton Taylor * 

Cobun, Frances V Morgantown Monongalia * 

Collins, Ava G Colfax Marion * * 

Collins, Merle M Bruceton Mills Preston * 

Clayton, Mabel E Baxter Marion * 

Clayton, Olive Baxter Marion * 

Clovis, Mrs. Walter ....Blacksville Monongalia * 

Cole, Blanche Morgantown Monongalia * 

Conaway, Zella Fairmont Marion * * * 

Cosner, Jessie Davis Tucker * 

Criss, Daisy Farmington Marion * 

C^ttrill, Mildred Mannington Marion * * 

Cougill, Leone Parker Randolph * 

Cox, Margaret E Chester Hancock * 

Cross, Hazel Viola Mannington Marlon * 

Crow, Thelma Cameron . Marshall * 

Cuppert, Harrell I Bruceton Mills Preston * 

Currence, Lillian Elkins Randolph * * 

Curtis, Ethel St. Marys Pleasants * 

Daetwyler, Barnice ....Helvetia Randolph * 

Damron, Margaret P...Jane Lew .iLewis * 

Darby, Cora Maud ....Bruceton Mills Preston * * 

Davis, Hattie Hammond Marion * * 

Davison, Carol E Mt. Clare Harrison * 

DeLancey, Tessie Ellenboro Ritchie * 

Dent, Mary Troy Gilmer * * 

De Vault, Charlotte W. Wellsburg Brooke * 

Dice, Bonnie Franklin Pendleton * * 

Dicken, Mary MargaretFairmont Marion * * 

Dickinson, Mary C. ...Morgantown Monongalia * * 

Dickinson, Virginia E.Morgantown Monongalia * 

Dietz, Gertrude St. George Tucker * • 

Dolan, Florence Clarksburg Harrison * 

Doman, Nellie Hazel ..Smithfield Wetzel • 

Dragoo, Louise Fairmont Marion * * * 

Dudley, Esther Chester Hancock * * 

Durr, Anna Mary Tunnelton Preston * 

Edwards, Kathaleen ....Belington Barbour * 

Erhard, Mildred K Davis Tucker * * 

Eminger, Edna LilHanRivesville Marion * 

Evans, Gladys Newburg Preston * 



110 



Fairmont State Normal School 



NAME 



POST OFFICE 



COUNTY 



1st 2nd 
S.S. Sem. Sem. Sp. 



Fawcett, Virginia Grafton Taylor * 

Feather, Cora Fairmont Marion 

Findley, Pauline Clarksburg Harrison 

Finley, Veva Grafton .Taylor 

Flanagan, Ruby BrownGrafton Taylor 

Fling, Fay Morgantown Monongalia 

Flesher, Anne Cowen Webster 

Francis, Beryl Rowlesburg Preston 

Ford, Alma Independence Taylor 

Forney, Clara Louise.-Mannington Marion 

Frame, Marie Gassaway Braxton 

Fromhart, Mary A Newburg Preston 

Frischkon, Ruth A Fairmont Marion 

Fortney, Braxie R Shinnston ....Harrison 

Frum, Mabel Fairmont Marion 

Gainer, Wanda Belington Barbour 

Gall, Genevra Moatsville Barbour 

Givens, Merton Vinson Arvilla Pleasants 

Goddink, Hallie L. Monongah Marion 

Golden, Mae Clarksburg Harrison 

Goff, Gretta -Weston Lewis 

Golden, Mayme Clarksburg Harrison 

Goldsborough, M. Romjney Hampshire 

Goodrich, Cecile Mt. Morris Greene 

Goodnight, Hazel Graifton .Taylor 

Gorby, Leah Littleton Wetzel 

Griffith, Margaret L...Farmington Marion 

Groves, Dora Mae Grafton Taylor 

Gumm, Edna Louise ....Frametown Braxton 

Gumm, Mary B Fairmont Marion 

Hale, Leonore Fairmont Marion 

Hall, Edith Muriel Fairmont Marion 

Halden, Ray Shinnston Harrison 

Haley, Rose Bridgeport Harrison 

Hale, Effie J Fairmont Marion 

Hall, Effie Beatrice ....Fairmont Marion 

Hall, Eva Gertrude ....Fairmont Marion 

Hall, Margaret Mannington Marion 

Hamilin, Evelyn Elkins Randolph * 

Hann, Nita Louise Davis Tucker * 

Hanes, Lorena Mannington Marion * 

Hanway, Virginia Grafton Taylor 

Hamrick, Agatha Marlinton Pocahontas * 

Harden, Florence E Fairmont Marion 

Harker, Jane Pentress Monongalia * 

Harbert, Ada Lee Dola Harrison * 

Hartlieb, Josephine ....Mannington Marion * 

Harvey, Mrs. Maud ....Mannington ... Marion * 



Fairmont State Normal School 



111 



NAME 



POST OFFICE COUNTY 



1st 2nd 
S.S. Sem. Sem. Sp. 



Haskins, Edna F Mannington Marion 

Haselden, Mary F Mt. Clare Harrison 

Haught, Linnie J"airview -Marion 

Hawkins, Lorraine Fairmont Marion 

Hawkins, Virginia A.Fairmont Marion 

Hawkins, Wilma Fairmont Marion 

Hayhurst, Clara IreneColfax Marion 

Heater, Agnes Dawmont Braxton .... 

Haymond, Virginia L...Fairmont Marion 

Helms, Martha Belle ..Newburg Preston 

Helms, Freda Newburg Preston 

Heater, Magdalene — Dawmont Harrison 

Heinzman, Blanche L.New Martinsville....Wetzel 

Heiskell, Flota L Independence Preston 

Henderson, Mildred ....Grafton .Taylor 

Hennen, Enid Cameron Marshall .... 

Henry, Lina Mae Manheim Preston 

Hill, Betty Louise Fairmont Marion 

Hillyard, Lenora BeMngton Barbour .... 

Hillyard, Ruth Belington Barbour .... 

Himelrick, Maude .Burton Wetzel 

Himmelrick, Essie .Burton Wetzel 

Himmelrick, JosephineBurton Wetzel 

Hughes, Hilda E Shinnston Harrison 

Hughes, Mary M Fairmont Marion 

Hiteshew, Bessie „Lumberport .Harrison 

Huey, Thelma Jean ...Mannington Marion 

Hunter', Mabel Mannington Marion 

Hyer, Hazel lone .Flatwoods Braxton .... 

Ice, Lona Mannington Marion 

Leach, Emma H Grafton .Taylor 

Lemley, Bessie Blacksville Monongalia 

Lemley, Margaret V. ..Burton Wetzel 

Lewis, Eugenia .Rachel Marion 

Ice, Opal Gay Worthington Marion 

Iden, Nellie .Davis Tucker 

Inghram, Adela Mae ..Barrackville Marion 

Jackson, Kathleen M...Jane Lew Lewis 

Jenkins, Ellen Gladys..Albright Preston 

Jenkins, Mary Fern ...JFarmington Marion 

Jenkins, Martha Fairmont Marion 

John, Olive Chester Hancock ... 

Johnson, Adaline C Mannington Marion 

Johnson, Audrie Fairmont Marion 

Joyce, Irene Four States Marion 

Keith, Emma Harrisville Ritchie 

Kerns, Margaret Reta Rowlesburg Preston 

Kerns, Mary Loretta ..Smithfield Wetzel 



112 



Fairmont State Normal School 



name 



POST OFFICE COUNTY 



S.S. 



1st 
Sem. 



2nd 
Sem. 



Kline, Elizabeth Fairmont Marion 

Knarr, Edith Mildred-Gypsy Harrison 

Knisely, Edna Mildred Barrackville Marion 

Knisely, Grace Lee ....Fairmont Marion 

Kunst, Irene -Grafton .Taylor 

Lambert, Jessie D Ellenboro Ritchie 

Lang, Ottie Pearl Marlinton Ritchie 

Laughlin, Pauline Metz —Marion 

Laughlin, Irene Metz Marion 

Lanham, Beulah Independence Preston 

Lanham, Bessie Blacksville Monongalia 

Lanham, Gladys Independence Preston 

Lemley, Alphie Fairmont Marion 

Little, Beatrice Bridgeport Taylor 

Lockhart, Barbara A.. .Ravens wood Jackson 

Linger, Delia Pearl ....Cairo Richie 

Linger, Mona .Cairo Richie 

Maine, Mattie Hundred ....Wetzel 

Mahle, Ruby Ellen Davis Tucker 

Malotte, Virginia Fairmont Marion 

Martin, Avis Fairmont Marion 

Martin, Harriette .Enterprise Harrison 

Marple Clora Flatwoods Braxton 

Mazzie, Anna M Shinnston Harrison 

Mason, Hildred L. Kansooth Marshall 

Mason, Julia Ward ....Fairmont Marion 

Mason, Nellie -...Ravenswood Jackson 

Matthews, Emma T.....Cameron Marshall 

Matthews, Edna Cameron Marshall _ 

Mayne, Alvaretta Shinnston Harrison 

McCauley, Margaret ...Fairmont Marion * 

McCoHam, Grace F. ...Millcreek Randolph * 

McClure, Irene .Morgantown Monongalia * 

McCray, Ruth B Fairview -Marion • 

McDonough, Catherine Parkersburg Wood 

McDowell, Dorothy .Fairmont Marion 

McElroy, Myrtle East Liverpool, O. • 

McKain, Margaret Monongah Marion * 

Mclntyre, Beulah (Oklahoma) • 



McNeely, Grace EtheL.Mannington Marion 

McWhorter, Marion ....Fairmont Marion 

McMunn, Fredia Glover Gap Marion • 

McVicker, Daisy May..Fairmont Marion ■ 

Menear, Edith Maude..Thornton Tyler • 

Merrill, Margaret M.-Rivesville Marion 

Miller, Anna Jane .Loring Ohio * 

Millan, Marian .Smithfield Wetzel 

Milligan, Elizabeth M.Chester Hancock * 



Fairmont State Normal School 113 

1st 2nd 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S.S. Sem. Sem. Sp. 

Minnick, Susan St. Marys Pleasants * 

Morgan, Gertrude .Fairmont Marion * * 

Morgan, Virginia Clarksburg Harrison * * 

Morgan, Willa Rivesville Marion * * 

Morgan, Isabel Eliza ..Clarksburg Harrison * * 

Morgan, Margaret V..-Farmington Marion * 

Moore, Mary Madeline Mannington Marion * 

Moore, Dorothy Fairmont Marion * 

Morris, Beatrice B Shinnston Harrison * 

Morrow, Pauline Fairmont Marion * * 

McCarty, Pearl Sands..Fairmont Marion * 

Murphy, Anna KathrynNewburg Preston * * * 

Musgrove, Doris Opal-Fairmont Marion * * 

Musser, Erma ..Clarksburg Harrison * * 

Muster, Nora Lumberport Harrison * 

Nethken, Carmen V Cincinnati (Ohio) * 

Myers, Clearcy Ellen ..Shinnston Harrison * 

Norris, Eleanor J Willow Pleasants * 

Nuzum, Pauline E Fairmont Marion * * 

Nuzum, Naoma Fairmont Marion * 

Ogden, Nina Wallace Harrison * 

Odgin, Jennie Algene..St. Marys Pleasants * 

Orr, Hazel Violet Shinnston Harrison * * 

O'Neal, Ada Blanche ..Pullman -Ritchie * 

Orr, Reva Madaline ....Wallace Harrison * 

Parks, Mildred A Mt. Clare Harrison * 

Parsons, Edythe V Davis Tucker * * 

Peaslee, Addiei B Rowlesburg Preston * 

Phipps, Eva B Blacksville Monongalia * * 

Phillips, Inez Cameron Marshall * 

Phipps, Ova Smithfield Wetzel * 

Pigott, Ruth L Shinnston Harrison * 

Potts, Helen .New Martinsville....Wood * * 

PoweM, Mildred M Adamston Harrison * * 

Powell, Cecyle M Blacksville Monongalia * 

Poole, Norma Pennsylvania 

Powell, Opal Mae Blacksville Monongalia * 

Pastorious, Elizabeth ..Clarksburg Harrison * 

Pethtal Minnie Jane ....Fairview Marion * 

Pethtal, Ella Fairview Marion * 

Provance, Mary E .Grafton Taylor * 

Pritchard, Mona Pennsboro Ritchie * 

Radcliffe, Jennette O.-.Fairmont Marion * * 

Rannenburg, Hazel ....Fairmont .Marion * * 

Reitz, Margaret JElkins Randolph * * 

Riggs, Eva .Cameron Marshall „ * * * 

Rex. Lucille Hundred Wetzel * * 

Richardson, Edith Flatwoods Braxton * 



114 



Fairmont State Normal School 



NAME 



POST OFFICE COUNTY 



1st 2nd 
S.S. Sem. Sem. Sp. 



Rich, Elizabeth Fairmont Marion * 

Ridenour, Agnes Clifton Mills Preston * 

Roberts, Ruth I Independence Preston 

Roberts, Edna Mannington Marion 

Robinson, Ruth Wilsonburg Harrison 

Robinson, Mae E Fairview Marion 

Riley, Mabel Willard ..Morgantown Monongalia 

Robinson, Thelma Uittleton Wetzel 

Robinson, Beryl Eva ..Hastings ..Wetzel 

Robison, Martha J Fairmont Marion 

Rogers, Freda Grafton Taylor 

Romino, Mary Louise..Fairmont Marion 

Rogers, Lena Fairmont Marion 

Rogers, Hazel H Independence _ Preston 

Rohrbaugh, Myrl G Weston Lewis 

Rose, Ethel Heaters Braxton 

Rosenberger, Elizabeth Belington Barbour 

Ross, Elizabeth Mrs. ....Fairmont Marion 

Ross, Zelma Virginia..Simpson Taylor 

Russell, Adeline Burton Wetzel * 

Rymer, Ruth Mannington Marion 

Scalise, Josephine Fairmont Marion 

Schutte, Beryl Edna ....Adamston Harrison 

Scott, Nellie Smithfield Wetzel * 

Shaffer, Florence R Grafton Taylor * 

Shaffer, Mary M Grafton Taylor * 

Shane, Grace Fairview Marion * 

Shaver, Freda Brit Brown Harrison * 

Scriinnage, Pearl Grafton Taylor * 

Shepherd, Bessie Belington Barbour * 

Showalter, Marguerite..Hundred Wetzel * 

Shroyer, Lola Virginia Thornton ,....Taylor * 

Sine, Annie Laurie ....Blacksville Monongalia * 

Smith, Lillian Earnshaw Wetzel * 

Smith, Gladys .Bridgeport Harrison * 

Smith, Nellie C Waverly Wood * 

Snider, Vivian Moore.... Grafton Taylor * 

Smoot, Alma Pauline.—Newburg Preston * 

Snodgrass, Gladys D...SmithfieId Wetzel 

Sole, Ruth Fairmont Marion 

Southern, Mary K Nutter Fort Harrison * 

Spitznogle, Hargaret ..Hundred Wetzel * 

Sprigg, Georgie Sutton Braxton * 

Springer, Mary C Fairmont Marion 

Stalnaker, Pearl Weston Lewis 

Stanley, Mabel Fairmont Marion 

Stark, Zula Wilma Brown Harrison * 

Stewart, Ora Blanche..Fairmont Marion 



Fairmont State Normal School 



115 



NAME 



POST OFFICE COUNTY 



1st 2nd 
S.S. Sem. Sem. 



Stewart, Anna K Fairmont Marion . 

Stewart, Myrtle Raven Rock Pleasants 

Stewart, Ruby New Martinsville....Wetzel _. 

Straight, Elba Pearl ....Mannington Marion .. 

Storey, Betty S Mannington Marion . 

Straight, Sylvia Rivesville Marion . 

Studivan, Eunice Omdorff Webster .. 

Sturm, Pauline Shinnston Harrison 

Swan, Mary Frances....Middlebourne -Tyler 

Swisher, Jettie June ....Catawba Marion 

Swiger, Jessie Oma ....Mannington Marion 

Talbott, Lela Gladys...-Ellamore Randolph 

Talkington, Sadie Hundred Wetzel 

Tetrick, Vera Dome ....Enterprise Harrison 

Tennant, Sallie E. Barrackville Marion 

Taylor, Laura -Brownsville Fayette .. 

Taylor, Reland -Fairmont Marion .. 

Taylor, Lee May St. Marys Pleasants 

Taylor, Stella B -Williamson .Mingo 

Thomas, Flora Cameron Marshall 

Thomas, Hazel Hundred Wetzel 

Thomas, Madeline Barrackville Marion 

Thomas, Mary Eliza — Fairmont Marion .. 

Thomas, Ruth Hundred Wetzel 

Thomas, Virginia A Weirton .Hancock 

Thompson, Alice Fairmont Marion 

Toothman, Lillie Mae..Fairview Marion 

Thompson, Roma R. ....Belington Barbour 

Tucker, Lyda M Chester Hancock 

Toothman, Maggie M. Fairview Marion 

Ungar, Nancy J Elkins Randolph 

Underwood, Grace Fairview Marion 

Underwood, Sarah M...Fairview Marion .. 

Villers, Josephine Littleton Wetzel 

Wagner, Theora Belle Cameron Marshall 

Wallace, Sara U Fairmont Marion 

Walker, Naomi Fairmont Marion 

Watkins, Wilma C Shinnston Harrison 

Watson, Elinor B Fairmont Marion 

Weaver, Mary C Fairview Marion .. 

Ward, Helen Mill Creek Randolph 

Weber, Helen B Grant Town Marion .. 

Webner, Louise Glover Gap Marion .. 

Werner, Dahlia G Clarksburg Harrison 

Welld, Mildred Farmington Marion .. 

Wells, Norma J Dallas Marshall 

Wharton, Willa R New Martinsville... .Wetzel 

Whitescarver, Nellie ..Grafton Taylor .... 



116 Fairmont State Normal School 

1st 2nd 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S.S. Sem. Sem. 

Willis, Mildred Lumberport ..Ii'arrison * * 

Willia, Olaf Geneva ....Fairmont Marion * 

Williams, Ruth L Morgantown Monongalia * 

Wiles, Florence E Hoult Marion 

Wilson, Bonnie Belington Barbour 

Wilson, Bess Cowen Webster * 

Wilson, Bessie Ellen ..Flemington Taylor * 

Wilson, Sylvia Opal ....Rivesville Marion * 

Wilson, Virginia Bee..Grafton Taylor * 

Wilson, Virginia C Fairview Marion * * 

Wilson, Valda Fairmont Marion * * * 

Wimer, Floda G Jane Lew Lewis * 

Wolfe, Ruth _Bructon Mills Preston * 

Wright, Mary Lillian ..Rinehart Harrison * 

Wright, Tessie Newburg Preston * 

Wendell, Mrs. Lelia ....Terra Alta Preston * 

Woods, Leah S Littleton Wetzel * 

Zarbaugh, Hazel V Hastings Harrison * 

Zeller, Margaret C Terra Alta Preston * 

Zirkle, Winona Brown Harrison * 

Ott, Jane Big Run Wetzel * 

Abruzzeno, Frank Shinnston Harrison * 

Ammons, Stephen C Fairview Monongalia * 

Amos, Otho W Pullman Ritchie * * 

Anderson, R. Edward..Rowlesburg Preston * 

Barker, Carl O Shinnston Harrison * 

Bollman, Andrew M...Mannington Marion * 

Bell, Charles Ross Rector Lincoln * 

Brown, Wayman Lumberport Harrison * 

Cartright, Leo James-Mannington Marion * 

Chaney, Joseph Watson Marion * 

Church, Archie Glover Gap Wetzel * 

Copenhaver, Charles C.Wallace Wetzel * 

Clendenin, Charles Grafton Taylor * 

Clovis, Walter Blacksville Monongalia * 

Conley, Frank Gay Fairmont Marion * 

Cubbon, Claude H Lumberport Harrison * 

Davis, Rufus Hammond Marion * 

Dellaman, Roby V Smithfield Wetzel * 

Fink, Logan O Watson Marion * 

Floyd, Ralph Mannington Marion * 

Furbee, Franklin Grafton -Taylor * 

Gump, Orval Fairmont Marion * 

Hayes, Howard Barrackville Marion * 

Jenkins, Robert Bruceton Mills Preston * 

Johnson, Charles M Blacksville Monongalia * 

Keister, Leslie A Fairmont Marion * 



Fairmont State Normal School 117 

1st 2nd 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S.S. Sem. Sem. Sp. 

Kendall, Paul Mannington Marion * 

Knisely, Alfred T Fairview Marion * 

Harris, Samuel Fairmont Marion * 

Ice, Ben H Mannington Marion * 

Ice, Roy E Mannington Marion * 

Keister, Glenn A Fairmont Marion * 

Michael, Paul G Fairview Marion * 

Minnick, Lowell St. Marys Pleasants * 

Monroe, George L Fairview 1 Marion * 

Michael, Carroll Barrackville Marion * * 

Moore, Mahlon Fairview Marion * 

Moyers, Clarence E Bruceton Mills Preston * 

Murphy, Joseph Blacksville Monongalia * 

Miller, Bryon Fairview Marion * 

Orr, Henry Fairmont Marion * 

Owen, Denzel G -Blacksville Monongalia * 

Parrish, Lee Mannington Marion * 

Reed, Fred Martin Boothsville Marion * 

Reed, John Clark Boothsville Marion * 

Rector, Burlyn M Shinnston Harrison * * 

Rittenhouse, George ....Mannington Marion * * 

Robinson, Kenneth Shinnston Harrison * * * 

Rowley, J. V Shinnston Harrison * 

Ryan, Ray Bruceton Mills Preston * 

Scott, Neill Smithfield Wetzel * 

Seese, A. Arol Shinnston Harrison * * 

Sharps, A. B Lumberport Harrison * 

Straight, Edgar PauL.Barrackville Marion * * 

Showalter, Karl Clarksburg Harrison * 

Shuman, William Blacksville „ Monongalia * 

Snider, Otis Ralph Watson Marion * 

Stewart, Robert F Philippi Barbour * 

Stewart, Troy Opie ....Wallace Harrison * 

Teagarden, Hobson — Littleton Wetzel * 

Tennant, Bryon Ross..Rivesville Marion * 

Tucker, John R Folsom Wetzel * 

Thomas, Harold B Barrackville Marion * * 

Whiteman, Lester J...Shinnston Harrison * * 

Williams, Lornie P. ..Fairview Marlon * * 

Wilkinson, Renick Bruceton Mills Preston * 

Yates, Farrel Grafton Taylor * 

Sandy, Howard L Shinnston Harrison * 

Wilson, D. E Fairview Marion * 

Wood, Walter A Grafton Taylor * 



118 



Fairmont State Normal School 



name 



SPECIAL STUDENTS 1924-1925 



POST OFFICE COUNTY 



1st 2nd 
S.S. Sem. Sem. 



Edmondson, Gladys C... Morgantown Monongalia 

Engler, Bertha Helvetia Randolph ... 

Hall, Florence M Williamson Mingo 

Michael, Grace Fairmont Marion 

Moore, Beulah Huntersville Pocanhontas 

Nine, Bell Morgantown Monongalia 

Robinson, Bess May ....Morgantown Monongalia 

Eliason, Ruth Fairmont Marion 

Hardisty, R. C Enterprise Marion 

Lemley, Harry Morgantown Monongalia 

Moore, Oakey W Fairview Marion 



Fairmont State Normal School 



119 



NAME 



MUSIC STUDENTS 

POST OFFICE 



COUNTY 



Black, Mrs. W. T Fairmont 

Black, James Morton Fairmont 

Beeler, Pauline Fairmont , 

Brobst, Marion Fairmont 

Caudy, Lucille ~ -Camden-on-Gauley 

Dotson, Calora Fairmont 

Fishback, Irma Fairmont 

Fishback, Loretta Fairmont 

Fawcett, Virginia Grafton 

Gall, Elsie Philippi 



.Marion 

.Marion 

.Marion 

.Marion 

.Webster 

.Marion 

.Marion 

.Marion 

.Taylor 

.Barbour 



Grau, Elfrienda Fairmont Marion 

Grau, Martha .Fairmont Marion 

Hall, Mary Josephine .Fairmont Marion 

Harker, Jand Pentress Monongalia 

Hawkins, Adelaide Fairmont Marion 

Jackson, Doris Fairmont Marion 

Jackson, Dorothy Fairmont Marion 

Jackson, Olive May Fairmont Marion 

Joyce, Irene Four States Marion 

Knight, Elizabeth Fairmont Marion 

Mayers, Elizabeth Fairmont Marion 

Martin, Marjorie .Fairmont Marion 

McCarty, Mary Lee Fairmont Marion 

McLaughlin, Doris -Fairmont Marion 

Minear, Louise Fairmont Marion 

Nuzum, Naomi .Bridgeport ..X Taylor 

Pacific©, Janet Fairmont Marion 

Parsons, Indianola Proctor Wetzel 

Potter, Ruth Fairmont Marion 

Price, Blanche Fairmont Marion 

Randall, Margaret Fairmont Marion 

Reed, June Fairmont Marion 

Rogers, Eugene Fairmont Marion 

Staggers, Laura Fairmont Marion 

Scott, Jean Fairmont Marion 

Schimmel, Paul Fairmont Marion 

Talbott, Elizabeth Fairmont Marion 

Talbott, Lela Ellamore Randolph 

Talbott, Marguerite Fairmont — Marion 

Vingle, Stanley Fairmont Marion 

Weigland, Agnes Fairmont Marion 

Winner, Floda _Jane Lew Lewis 

Wells, Norma Jeannette Dallas Marshall 

Fishback, Mary Ellen Fairmont Marion 



120 Fairmont State Normal School 

EXTENSION STUDENTS 1924-1925 

name post office county 

Adams, Florence Clarksburg Harrison 

Adams, Leona Coketon Tucker 

Alderton, Ruth Davis Tucker- 
Allen, Garlen Wallace Harrison 

Allen, Luvenia Hundred Wetzel 

Allen, Sadie Wallace Harrison 

Allender, A. N Grafton Taylor 

Ammons, Nelle O Mannington Marion 

Anderson, Asa H Smithfield Wetzel 

Anderson, Earl L, Watson Marion 

Anderson, Robert E Rowlesburg Preston 

Armstrong, Bryan Independence Taylor 

Ash, Columbus Adamston Harrison 

Ashburn, Tensie Parkersburg Wood 

Athey, Arrilla Vienna Wood 

Atkinson, Frances White Sulphur Spgs. Greenbrier 

Backus, Goldie M Parkersburg Wood 

Balderson, Estyl Fairmont Marion 

Ball, Leta M Maggie Mason 

Bane, Frank J Wadestown Monongalia 

Barker, Carl Shinnston Harrison 

Bartlett, Monna Volga Barbour 

Bartlett, Ola Frances Grafton Taylor 1 

Baughman, J. E Sutton -Braxton 

Baughman, O. O Belington Barbour 

Beck, Esther Follansbee Brooke 

Beckman, Jessie K, — Grafton Taylor 

Bennett, Beulah Grafton Taylor 

Bennett, J. F Pierce Tucker 

Bent, Rudyard K Buckhannon Upshur 

Bethel, Georgie Sutton Braxton 

Bevan, Clara E ..Rowlesburg Preston 

Bevlyn, Minnie Smi&ifield Wetzel 

Blaney, Harriet Grafton Taylor 

Bird, Ruby Thomas Tucker 

Black, Parker C Parkersburg Wood 

Blackwood, Katharine JCharleston Kanawha 

Bock, Bessie .Farmington Marion 

Boggs, Sara Sutton Braxton 

Bond, Mary Louise Albright Preston 

Bonner, John W Wallace Harrison 

Bowermaster, Mary E Bruceton Mills Preston 

Bowers, Garnett Parkersburg Wood 

Bowers, Hazel Parkersburg Wood 

Bowles, Annie MacDonald Fayette 

Bramlett, James M Shinnston Harrison 



Fairmont State Normal School 



121 



NAME 



POST OFFICE 



COUNTY 



Bramlett, Pearl Laird Shinnston Harrison 



Brand, Sybil Rachel 

Brandenburg, Mabel Belington .... 

Bright, Dessie Clarksburg .. 

Bristow, Jeddie Thomas 

Brown, Ethel Sutton 

Brown, Fountie Julia 

Brown, Hugh Lumberport 

Brown, Margaret Kingwood .... 

Brown, Wayman Lumlberport 

Bryner, Ina Floy Worthington 

Bunner, Ruby Pearl Eilenboro .... 

Burge, Bessie Parkersburg 

Burge, Mabel M Parkersburg 

Burke, Leo -Rowlesburg 

Burley, Velma Davis 

Bums, Mary Virginia Terfa Alta .. 

Byard, Laura Smithfield .... 

Byer, Eunice Fairmont .... 



. Marion 

.Barbour 

.Harrison 

.Tucker 

.Braxton 

.Greenbrier 

.Harrison 

.Preston 

.Harrison 

.Marion 

.Ritchie 

.Wood 

.Wood 

.Preston 

.Tucker 

.Preston 

.Wetzel 

.Marion 



Caldwell, Lucy Fulton, Mo 

Cale, Claude Terra Alta Preston 

Cannaday, Josephine Charleston Kanawha 

Carder, Orpha Sutton Braxton 

Carlson, Rudolph H Ossian, Ind 

Carmen, Mary Hundred Wetzel 

Carroll, Lot Sutton Braxton 

Cary, Winina Shepherdistown Jefferson 

Chalfont, Margaret Fairview Marion 

Chandler, Ruth L. Thomas Tucker 

Channell, Edna Elkins Randolph 

Chenoweth, Kenneth E Grafton Taylor 

Chenoweth, Marion Weston Lewis 

Chrislip, Allen R Philippi Barbour 

Clark, Helen Morgantown Monongalia 

Cochran, Jessie Grafton Taylor 

Cochran, John „ Reader _ Wetzel 

Cole, Edith -Adamston Harrison 

Collins, Merle Bruceton Mills Preston 

Colville, Frances M Sutton Braxton 

Craig, Bitha Carrollton, Ky 

Cordray, Martha Morgantown Monongalia 

Cowan, Ida Fairview Marion 

Crane, Beatrice Maud Wetzel 

Crimm, Pearl Wyatt Harrison 

Cullinan, Agnes Dean Wetzel 

Curry, Kathleen .Belington Barbour 



Curry, Mrs. T. A. 



Thomas Tucker 



122 Fairmont State Normal School 

NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY 

Curry, Virginia Thomas Tucker* 

Curtis, Sarah Weston Lewis 

Darby, Cora M Bruceton Mills Preston 

Darnall, Bly French Creek Upshur 

Davis, Esther Parkersburg Wood 

Davis, Hattie -Hammond Marion 

Davis, Jessie L - Winona Fayette 

DeBerry, Mary B Terra Alta Preston 

DeMoss, Ada Grafton Taylor 

Dennison, Opal Salem Harrison 

Devine, Ethel Hundred Wetzel 

DeWitt, George Manheim Preston 

Dietz, Opal Cameron Marshall 

Dillamon, Roy Smithfield Wetzel 

Dingess, L. C Varney Mingo 

Dodd, Harvey Clarksburg Harrison 

Donalds, Dorothy -Thomas Tucker 

Dorr, Doris H Morgantown Monongalia 

Dorsey, Mary Merle Kingwood Preston 

Dotson, Austin Pennsboro Ritchie 

Drummond, Neva R Adamston Harrison 

Dumire, Ethel Ben Bush Tucker 

Duncan, H. L Shinnston Harrison 

Dunham, Lacy Farmington Marion 

Durr, Anna M Tunnelton Preston 

Dye, Madge Hundred Wetzel 

Eastman, L. H Mannington Marion 

Edwards, Kathaleene Belington Barbour 

Eib, Irene Elkins Randolph 

Engle, Ethel Middlebourne Tyler 

Evans, T. Sterling Vienna Wood 

Everly, Madalene Kingwood Preston 

Fawcett, Virginia Grafton Taylor 

Ferguson, Ruth Fairmont Marion 

Finley, Veva Grafton Taylor 

Fleming, Joseph H St. Marys Pleasants 

Flesher, Anne R. .Cowen Webster 

Floyd, Anna .Mannington Marion 

Floyd, Ralph B Mannington Marion 

Forbes, Margaret L. Morgantown Monongalia 

Ford, Mrs. C. L Clarksburg -Harrison 

Fortney, Braxie R. Shinnston Harrison 

Frame, Katherine Hart Charleston Kanawha 

Francis, Beryl Rowlesburg Preston 

Franklin, John B Parkersburg Wood 



Fairmont State Normal School 



123 



NAME POST OFFICE 

Frantz, Edwina Tunnelton 

Fraser, Jessie M Charleston 

Frazier, Elva V Wheeling 

Frazier, Mary Fairmont 

Fromhart, Mary Newburg 

Fuller, Ethel M Ceredo 

Funk, Susan P Rowlesburg 



COUNTY 

.Preston 
.Kanawha 
Ohio 
.Marion 
Preston 
.Wayne 
.Preston 



Furbee, Bessie Ogden Terra Alta Preston 



Gable, Mildred Pierce 

Gainer, Wanda Belington ... 

Gall, Audra A -Belington .... 

Gall, Elsie M Philippi 

Garrett, J. William Sutton 

Garrett, Mary Brown Sutton 

Gates, Bernice A Parkersburg 

Gerwig, Ava Charleston .. 

Gibbs, Lena L Mason 

Gifford, W. H Wallace 



......Tucker 

Barbour 

Barbour 

Barbour 

Braxton 

Braxton 

Wood 

Kanawha 

Mason 

Harrison 

Glass, Anna M Sissonsville Kanawha 

Glover, Nancy Anne Glover Gap Marion 

Glover, Verna Ravenswood Jackson 

Goodwin, Nellye Kingwood Preston 

Goff, Mildred Rose Cowen Webster 

Golden, M. L Flatwoods Braxton 

Goode, Lula M Fairmont Marion 

Goodno, Louise Belpre, 

Goodwin, Florence Benwood Marshall 

Goudy, Robert Parkersburg Wood 

Griffith, Margaret Farmington Marion 

Gumm, Mary B Simpson Taylor 

Gwynn, J. E Kingwood Preston 



Hagan, Ruth .....Huntington Cabell 

Haggerty, Harland W Shinnston Harrison 

Halbritter, Faye Tunnelton Preston 

Hall, Belle C Parkersburg _ Wood 

Hall, Charles W New Martinsville Wetzel 

Hall, Chaucer Albright Preston 

Hall, Florence M Williamson Mingo 

Hall, R. H Thomas Tucker 

Halterman, Lona Mannington Marion 

Hamilton, Freda Hundred Wetzel 

Hammond, Val Sayre Parkersburg Wood 

Harbert, Richard E Dola Harrison 

Hardin, Juanita S Grafton Taylor 

Harker, Jane Pentress Monongalia 

Harris, Dorothy Glen Easton Marshall 



124 Fairmont State Normal School 



NAME 


POST OFFICE 


COUNTY 


Hartley, Marguerite 


....Elkins 


....Randolph 


Hartlieb, Josephine 


....Mannington 


....Marion 


Hatfield, Daskie 


....Logan 


.... Logan 


Haught, E. P 


....Cameron 


....Marshall 


Hawkins, Elsie 


....Sutton 


....Braxton 


Hawkins, Nettie 


....Rivesville 


.... Marion 


Head, Hazel R 


....Mt. Storm 


.... Grant 


Hefner, Leah 


Burnsville 


....Braxton 


Heline, Iva 


....Smithfield 


....Wetzel 


Hess, Rella 


— Farmington 


....Marion 


Hickman, Beatrice 


....Ripley 


....Jackson 


Higgins, Dorothy 


....Charleston 


....Kanawha 


Hill, Elizabeth 


.... Morgan town 


....Monongalia 


Hillyard, Lenora 


....Belington 


....Barbour 


Hillyard, Ruth 


....Belington 


....Barbour 


Himelrick, Essie 


....Burton 


....Wetzel 


Himelrick, Josephine 


Burton 


....Wetzel 


Himelrick, Maude 


....Burton 


.... Wetzel 


Hinebaugh, Thelma 


....Kingmont 


.... Marion 


Hines, Genevieve 


....Orndoff 


....Webster 


Holt, Edith C 


....Shinnston _ 


....Harrison 


Hespenheide, Ruth Thomas .... 


....Thomas 


....Tucker 


Hoyt, Viola 


....Thomas 


....Tucker 


Hubbs, Sophia 


....Glen Easton 


....Marshall 


Hudgins, Ercell 


....Tunnelton 


....Preston 


Hudkins, Lucille 


....Gassaway 


....Braxton 


Hughes, Lois 


..-Pinch 


.... Kanawha 


Hunt, E. A 


.... Lumberport 


....Harrison 


Hunt, Garrett 


....Burton 


.._ Wetzel 


Hutchinson, Helen 


.... Ravenswood 


.... Jackson 


Hann, Nita L 


....Davis 


....Tucker 


Ice, Lona 


....Mentz 


.... Marion 


Ice, Roy E 


....Mannington 


.... Marion 


Inghram, Elizabeth 


....Fairview 


....Marion 


Ireland, Dorothy 


.... Parkersburg 


.... Wood 


Jackson, J. A 


....Clarksburg 


....Harrison 


Jaco, Mattie 


..-Grafton 


....Taylor 


Janssen, Rose E 


....Terra Alta 


....Preston 


Jarvis, Ila Belle 


.... Parkersburg 


....Wood 


Jenkins, Ellen 


....Farmington 


....Marion 


Jenkins, Lula M 


....Montana Mines .... 


....Marion 


Johnson, J. Dale 


....Shinnston 


....Harrison 


Johnston, Alice 


....Hundred 


....Wetzel 


Johnson, Annabel 


....Thomas 


....Tucker 


Johnson, Bernard W 


....Thomas 


....Tucker 


Johnson, Effie M 


....Parkersburg 


....Wood 



Fairmont State Normal School 12'5 

name post office county 

Kear, Charlotte Charleston Kanawha 

Keene, Royal D Clarksburg Harrison 

Keim, Mabel Terra Alta Preston 

Kemper, Orpha Parkersburg Wood 

Kennedy, Eva Hundred Wetzel 

Kessel, Faith Ripley Jackson 

Kessel, Zorah Ripley Jackson 

Kibble, Edith Reeds ville, O 

Kidd, Bertha Adamston Harrison 

Kight, Delton Thomas ....Tucker 

King, R. E Kingwood Preston 

Knisely, Alfred FairView Marion 

Kyle, Orville A -Parkersburg Wood 

LaMar, Virginia B Lumberport Harrison 

Lanham, Ora M Charleston Kanawha 

Lantz, Marsh Pennsboro -Ritchie 

Leach, Emma H „ Grafton Taylor 

Lemley, Bessie Blacksville Monongalia 

Lemley, Margaret Burton Wetzel 

Lenhart, Berenice Kingwood Preston 

Leppert, Louise Ravenswood Jackson 

Licklider, Laura Shepherdstown Jefferson 

Light, Eleanor Hedgesville Berkeley 

Linger, Ernestine Boanoke Lewis 

Linger, March Roanoke Lewis 

Little, Charles Bridgeport Harrison 

Little, Pauline Clarksburg Harrison 

Lockhart, Barbara Ravenswood Jackson 

Long, Darl Parsons Tucker 

Lovell, W. W Wallace Harrison 

Luzader, Mrs. E Grafton Taylor 

Luzader, Mrs. E. A Adamston Harrison 

Ly«n, Hazel Wallace Harrison 

Law, Mrs. J. E Clarksburg -Harrison 

Mackler, Bessie Mannington Marion 

Maine, Mattie Hundred Wetzel 

Maiol, Nellie Jane Fairmont Marion 

Mapes, Myrtle Danville, O 

Martin, A. Glenn Jupiter, Fla 

Martin, Emzie Shinnston Harrison 

Martin, Harriet Enterprise Harrison 

Martin, M. Alice St. Albans Kanawha 

Martin, Chester Shinnston Harrison 

Mason, Mrs. N. E Terra Alta Preston 

Mason, Nellie Ravenswood Jackson 

Masters, Mabel Littleton Wetzel 



126 



Fairmont State Normal School 



name 



POST OFFICE 



COUNTY 



Mayne, Alma Enterprise 

McCarty, Pearl Sands Fairmont 

McClain, Lottie Clarksburg 

McGinnis, Carl -Glenville ... 

McKown, D. M Spencer 



.Harrison 
.Marion 
.Harrison 
Gilmer 
.Roane 



McLaughlin, Nelle Yeager Marlinton Pocahontas 

McQuain, Lois Troy Gilmer 1 

Merrifield, A. A Shinnston Harrison 

Mick, J. Earl Weston Lewis 

Miller, Adelle Charleston Kanawha 

Miller, Byron Fairview Marion 

Miller, Dessie Parkersburg Wood 

Miller, Earl Terra Alta Preston 

Miller, Anna Elm Grove Ohio 

Miller, Eleanor Shafer Terra Alta Preston 

Miller, Grace Grafton Taylor 

Mitchell, Magdalene Elm Grove Ohio 

Monger, Mildred B ....Hastings Wetzel 

Monroe, Lawton Lumberport Harrison 

Monroe, McKinley Lumberport Harrison 

Moore, Ruby Wallace Harrison 

Moore, Walter Simpson Taylor 

Moore, Wilcie Gassaway Braxton 

Morgan, Isabel Clarksburg Harrison 

Morris, Hazel Kingwood Preston 

Morris, Ruth Grafton Taylor 

Morrow, Theodore Paden City Wetzel 

Murdock, Myrtle Kingwood Preston 

Murphy, Anna Newburg Preston 

Murray, Irene Davis Tucker 

Myers, Emelyn Morton Charleston Kanawha 

Menear, James Kingwood Preston 



Naylor, Edwin C Ravenswood .. 

Neff, Ollie Smoot 

Newcome, John A Grafton 

Newman, Pauline Clarksburg .... 

Norman, Garner Parkersburg .. 

O'Dell, Elizabeth Fairmont 

O'Dell, Mrs. Forest Charleston .... 

O'Donnell, Earle V Fairmont 

Offutt, Edna V Clarksburg .... 

Ogden, Nina Wallace 

Ogdin, Caroline Williamstown 

Oney, Lonorra B Charleston .... 

Orr, Hazel Wallace 

Owens, Hattie Weston 

Owens, Mary Weston 



.Jackson 

.Grenebrier 

.Taylor 

.Harrison 

.Wood 

.Marion 
. Kanawha 
.Marion 
. Harrison 
. Harrison 
.Wood 
.Kanawha 
.Harrison 
.Lewis 
. Lewis 



Fairmont State Normal School 127 

name post office county 

Palmei*, Paul A Bebee Wetzel 

Park, Chester M Farmington Marion 

Park, Marjorie Farmington Marion 

Parrish, Archel Mannington Marion 

Paulie, Mrs. Ernest Pierce Tucker 

Peterson, Oda K Weston Lewis 

Phares, Myrtle _Riverton .Pendleton 

Phillips, Inez Cameron Marshall 

Pierce, Helen Cameron Marshall 

Pierce, Mildred Middlebourne Tyler 

Piggott, Katherine Wallace Harrison 

Plunkett, Eunice H Charleston Kanawha 

Poole, Norma Scottdale, Pa 

Pope, Arvella M Morgansville Doddridge 

Pownall, Helen Grafton Taylor 

Prince, Minnie B Parkersburg Wood 

Pryan, Audrey Skyles Webster 

Pyles, Ethel Fairview Marion 

Queen, Anise C Grafton Taylor 

Queen, H. M Grafton Taylor 

Randolph ,Mrs. H. T Bridgeport Harrison 

Hansell, Elizabeth Parkersburg Wood 

Rapp, Lillian Burke Lewisburg Greenbrier 

Raymer, Laura Moundsville Marshall 

Rector, Hazel Shinnston Harrison 

Rector, Mabel Oakland, Ky 

Reger, Gertrude Elkins Randolph 

Remer, Ella Hundred Wetzel 

Rex, Lucille Hundred Wetzel 

Reynolds, Edna F Caldwell -Grenebrier 

Rice, Mittie B Montrose Randolph 

Rich, Elizabeth Fairmont Marion 

Ridenour, P. S Grafton Taylor 

Rider, P. M Rivesville Marion 

Riggs, Edna T Cameron Marshall 

Righter, Charles L Shinnston Harrison 

Riley, Helen Rinehart Harrison 

Roberts, Ruth I Independence Preston 

Roberts, Odgar Hundred Wetzel 

Robey, Emma J Mannington Marion 

Robinson, Fred D Grafton Taylor 

Robinson, Hazel Kingwood Preston 

Robinson, John G Wallace Harrison 

Robinson, Kenneth Shinnston Harrison 

Robinson, Pauline Sturm Shinnston Harrison 

Robinson, Virginia E Monongah Marion 

Rogers, E. E Dola Harrison 



128 Fairmont State Normal School 

name post office county 

Rogers, Fred S Independence Preston 

Rogers, Freda Grafton Taylor 

Rohrbough, Leone Belington Barbour 

Rose, Dessie Miller Fairmont Marion 

Rose, Sarah Ethel Heaters Braxton 

Ross, Christine Grafton Taylor 

Rushford, Charlotte -New Martinsville ....Wetzel 

Russell, Ha B Mill Creek Randolph 

Rowley, J. V Shinnston Harrison 

Rymer, Olive Mannington Marion 

Rymer, Opal Grafton Taylor 

Sanders, O. G Terra Alta Preston 

Saunders, E. B Clarksburg Harrison 

Saunders, Lucy B Charleston Kanawha 

Schilansky, Bess Thomas Tucker 

Schilansky, Lena Thomas Tucker 

Schilansky, Lilia Thomas Tucker 

Scott, Neill Smithfield Wetzel 

Scott, Nellie Smithfield Wetzel 

Scott, Raymond Smithfield Wetzel 

Scroggins, Gladys Parkersburg Wood 

Shafer, Ethel M Kingwood Preston 

Sharps, A. B Lumberport Harrison 

Shepherd, Bessie Belington Barbour 

Shinn, Virginia Belington Barbour 

Shurtleff, Mary McCulloch Sutton Braxton 

Simmons, A. C Rexrode Pendleton 

Skiles, Ada Sabraton Monongalia 

Skinner, M. P Gassaway Braxton 

Slater, Sue Mannington Marion 

Slider, Mildred Kingwood Preston 

Smith, Dawn Fairmont Marion 

Smith, Ellen S Charleston Kanawha 

Smith, J. R -Smithfield Wetzel 

Smith, Nellie C Waverly Wood 

Smith, Thelma M Nutter Fort Harrison 

Smyth, Mildred L Morgantown Monongalia 

Snedegar, Delpha Marlinton Pocahontas 

Snider, Vivian M Grafton Taylor 

Snyder, Lillian Hundred _ Wetzel 

Springer, Thomas E Fairmont Marion 

Spurgeon, Lulu M Morgantown Monongalia 

Stephenson, Opal Williamson Mingo 

Stephenson, Sara _ Williamson Mingo 

Stalnaker, Edra Belington Barbour 

Stephens, H. E Marietta, O 

Stephenson, Enid Charleston Kanawha 



Fairmont State Normal School 129 

name post office county 

Stern, Beatrice Glen White Raleigh 

Strickling, Flossie Wellsburg Brooke 

Strothers, Bertha Rinehart Harrison 

Stuart, Robert F Philippi Barbour 

Sturm, Ella Shinnston Harrison 

Suder, Emil Thomas Tucker 

Sullivan, W. Cassel Adamston Harrison 

Summers, Ada Belington Barbour 

Swan, Mary F Middlebourne Tyler 

Swartz, Eleanor Thomas Tucker 

Swisher, Etta Sutton Braxton 

Swisher, Jettie Catawba Marion 

Sypolt, Wm. T .....Albright Preston 

Tackley, Susan Shotkus Thomas Tucker 

Talbot, Ruby .•. Philippi Barbour 

Talkington, Mae „ Hundred Wetzel 

Talkington, Sadie Hundred Wetzel 

Taylor, Ira Pennsboro Ritichie 

Teagarden, Ersel Littleton Wetzel 

Teagarden, Hobson -Littleton Wetzel 

Tennant, George Fairview Marion 

Tennant, Sallie Barrackville Marion 

Teter, Mrs. D. B Thomas Tucker 

Tetrick, Vera Enterprise Harrison 

Thompson, Irene Midd/lebourne -Tyler 

Thompson, Wm. W Thomas Tucker 

Thornhill, Gladys Belington Barbour 

Tidd, Mabel Parkersburg Wood 

Tucker, Gladys M Folsom Wetzel 

Turner, Roy W Hundred Wetzel 

Tuttle, Opal New Martinsville ....Wetzel 

Twyman, Lillian Middlebourne Tyler 

Uhl, Crystal Parkersburg Wood 

Vaughn, J. C .Sutton Braxton 

Viquesney, Winnie Belington Barbour 

Wagner, Fay Ravenswood Jackson 

Wagner„ Theora .Cameron Marshall 

Walls, Ruth Hudson Preston 

Walters, Kizzie .Charleston Kanawha 

Warder, Ina M Grafton Taylor 

Wakefield, Troy M Kingwood Preston 

Warfield, Mae Belpre, O 

Watson, Mabel Terra Alia Preston 

Watson, Madeline Masontown Preston 

Wendell, Lelia Terra Alta Preston 



130 Fairmont State Normal School 

name post office county 

Wertenberger, Leona Parkersburg Wood 

West, Mrs. George Clarksburg Harrison 

West, Ottie V Morgantown Monongalia 

White,, Grace Grafton Taylor 

White, Simon L Hundred Wetzel 

White, Florence Grafton Taylor 

Whitehair, G. W Terra Alta Preston 

Wilkinson, Darrell Shinnston Harrison 

Wilkinson, Florence H Grafton Taylor 

Williams, Anna Clarksburg Harrison 

Williams, Ruth Morgantown Monongalia 

Wilson, Audrey -Follansbee Brooke 

Wilson, Bess Cowen Webster 

Wilson, Virginia Bridgeport Harrison 

Wilhelm, Cecile Kingwood Preston 

Wilkens, Inez Independence Preston 

Wilson, Bonnie Belington Barbour 

Wilson, Lola Pierce Tucker 

Wilson, W. S Parkersburg Wood 

Wines, Dessie Walker Wood 

Winslow, Margaret White Clarksburg Harrison 

Winslow, Mary O Clarksburg Harrison 

Wise, Lena Davis Tucker 

Wolfe, Mrs. L. V Piedmont Mineral 

Wolfe, Ruth R Bruceton Mills Preston 

Wood, Walter A Grafton Taylor 

Woodford, O. J Philippi Barbour 

Woods, Phala „ Charlestons Kanawha 

Woodyard, Mary Ruth Grafton Taylor 

Wright, Hilda Newburg Preston 

Wright, Tessie Newburg Preston 

Wright, Juliette Parkersburg Wood 

Yeager, Mildred L Marlinton Pocahontas 

Yoak, Mrs. R. B. Jr Fairmont Marion 

Yost, Jane Fairmont Marion 

Yost, Mae Fairmont Marion 

Zellar, Margaret Terra Alta Preston 

Zimmerman, Carrie MeMechen Marshall 

Zinn, Hazel M Grafton Taylor 



Fairmont State Normal School 131 

EXTENSION DEPARTMENT ENROLLMENT BY 
COUNTIES 

Harrison 72 

Marion 65 

Preston 66 

Wetzel 43 

Taylor 36 

Wood 33 

Tucker 32 

Barbour 22 

Kanawha 21 

Braxton 19 

Monongalia 13 

Marshall 11 

Jackson 10 

Lewis 8 

Randolph - 6 

Greenbrier 6 

Tyler 5 

Webster 5 

Brooke 4 

Mingo 4 

Ritchie 4 

Ohio 3 

Pocahontas 3 

Fayette 2 

Gilmer 2 

Jefferson 2 

Mason 2 

Pendleton 2 

Berkeley 1 

Cabell 1 

Doddridge 1 

Grant _ 1 

Logan 1 

Mineral „ 1 

Pleasants 1 

Raleigh 1 

Roane 1 

Upshur 1 

Wayne 1 

490 

STATES 

Ohio 6 

Kentucky 2 

Florida 1 

Indiana 1 

Missouri 1 

Pennsylvania , 1 

11 



132 Fairmont State Normal School 

ENROLLMENT OF RESIDENCE STUDENTS BY 
COUNTIES AND STATES 

Marion 439 

Harrison 134 

Wetzel 68 

Monongalia 63 

Taylor 60 

Preston 58 

Lewis 26 

Marshall 22 

Barbour 19 

Braxton 18 

Randolph 17 

Jackson 13 

Tucker 13 

Ritchie 12 

Weston 12 

Pleasants '. 11 

Wood 11 

Hancock 8 

Tyler 6 

Ohio 5 

Pocahontas , 5 

Mason 4 

Mingo 4 

Hardy 3 

Nicholas 3 

Mercer 2 

Pendleton 1 

Brooke 1 

Doddridge 1 

Fayette 1 

Gilmer 1 

Green 1 

Hampshire 1 

Kanawha 1 

Raleigh 1 

STATES 

Ohio 4 

Pennsylvania 3 

Michigan 1 

Oklahoma 1 



Fairmont State Normal School 133 



SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT FOR 1924-1925 

Men Women Total 

College Seniors 22 25 47 

College Juniors 31 106 137 

College Sophomores 26 16 42 

College Freshmen 91 39 130 

Standard Normal Seniors 41 234 275 

Standard Normal Juniors 70 326 396 

Music Students 3 44 47 

Total 284 790 1074 

Counted Twice 19 19 

Different Residence Students 284 771 1055 

Extension Students 123 378 501 

Total 407 1149 1556 

Counted Twice 43 121 164 

Different Students Enrolled 364 1028 1392 



FAffiMONT PBINTWe CO., FAIHMONT, W. VA. 



Announcing the 

SPRING AND SUMMER TERMS 

At 

FAIRMONT STATE 
NORMAL SCHOOL 

A TEACHERS' COLLEGE 
FAIRMONT, WEST VIRGINIA 



Afyycl^ 


jjf^h^vxu. 


fp^ 


% ■ I 


^u 


ll^^^p 



19 2 7 

SPRING TERM: APRIL 26 TO JUNE 9 
SUMMER TERM: JUNE 13 TO AUGUST 12 

JOSEPH ROSIER, President 



The President and Faculty of Fairmont State Normal School 
take pleasure in announcing plans for the summer session oU 1927. 
The enrollment for the summer session at Fairmont Normal has been 
growing rapidly and steadily for several years, culminating in 1925 
in an enrollment of 800 students. 

Fairmont State Normal School is decisively and distinctively a 
teacher-training institution. The summer school of this institution 
therefore, is planned entirely for those who are teaching or prepar- 
ing to teach. It is possible for students other than present or pros- 
pective teachers to secure some credit at Fairmont Normal during 
the summer, but all the work of the term is focused on and adapted 
to the training of teachers. 



SPRING TERM 

The Spring term of six weeks will open on April 26, and close 
on June 9. Many of the regular classes of the second semester will 
be open to spring term students, and a number of new classes will 
be started. Classes in education, English, mathematics, nature study, 
geography, and in other subjects will be offered, in both the College 
and Normal School departments. Students are permitted to carry 
five semester hours, or by permission of the Committee on Classifi- 
cation and Credits, six semester hours. The course in observation 
and practice teaching will not be open to spring term students. The 
tuition for this term will be five dollars. 



SUMMER SCHOOL FACULTY 



Joseph Rosier President 

Walter Barnes Director 

I. F. Boughter History 

Laura E. Briggs Art 

W. E. Buckey Prin. Training School 

Jasper Colebank Physical Education 

Eva Day Compton Home Economics 

Virginia Gaskill Home Economics 

Mary Blanche Gibson Education 

A. J. Gibson Education 

Frank Hall Education 

Catherine Hammond Physical Education 

C. O. Haught Physics 

Maude M. Hull Education 

Richard E. Hyde Education 

Ethel Ice Rural Sociology 

Louise Leonard Education 

Laura F. Lewis English 

E. L. Lively Sociology 

M. E. McCarty Mathematics 

E. E. Mercer Literature 

Paul F. Opp Public Speaking 

J. H. Patterson English 

John W. Pence History 

Mary B. Price Public School Music 

M. Dorcas Prichard History 

C. M. Roberts Nature Study 

Gertrude Roberts _ Mathematics 

H. F. Rogers Chemistry 

J. Francis Shreve Psychology 

Oliver Shurtleff Education 

Marjorie Tate English 



ENTRANCE 

The following classes of students are eligible for entrance to 
the summer session in Fairmont Normal : 

1. High School graduates. 

2. High School students who have completed 15 units of work. 

3. Perseus 18 years of age or over, who have not finished a 
High School course — but such persons cannot graduate from 
any course in this institution until they have secured credit 
for a High School course. 

COURSES OFFERED 

Fairmont State Normal Schcol offers two general courses: the 
College course leading to a degree of A.B. in Education, and the 
Standard Normal course leading to a diploma. 

The College Course 

The college course consists of four years of work above High 
School graduation, 128 semester hours. Work done at other col- 
legiate institutions of recognized standing will be accepted hour for 
hour at this institution, but at least 32 semester hours must be dene 
here, 16 hours of which must be taken during the senior year. The 
degree from Fairmont State Normal School is fully recognized and 
accredited. 



The Standard Normal Course 

The standard normal course censists of two full years of work 
beyond high school graduation, 64 semester hours. Three curricula 
are offered: primary, intermediate, and junior high. Work done 
in other normal schools or colleges 1 will be accredited, but at least 
32 hours must be done at this institution, 24 hours of which must 
be residence work. 



Short Course Certificate 

According to the regulations of the State Board of Education, 
the Normal School is authorized to grant the short course certifi- 
cate to anyone already a high school graduate who completes the 
regular junior normal year, 32 hours, at Fairmont Normal. No 
diploma is given for the completion of such a course, but a Short 
Normal Certificate is conferred, which entitles the person holding 
it to teach for a number of years aSiid to renew the certificate for 
an additional period. 



WHEN AND HOW TO ENROLL 

The summer term begins on June 13th. This is the only day 
set apart for registration. Students' who enter after that day may 
find that some of the courses have been closed and that they will 
have to await the convenience of the class adviser to have their 
assignments worked out. It is extremely important that students 
enroll on June 13. Enrollment will begin at 7:30 in the morning 
and continue during the day and, if necessary, during a part of the 
evening. The method of registering is very simple. Students come 
into the building at the main entrance, fill out one registration card 
(blue) and the information side of two enrollment cards (white) ; 
they follow the line to the library; here they leave registration cards 
at the Registrar's desk, pay the fee ($10.00) at the Secretary's desk, 
go to class adviser for study assignments and leave enrollment cards 
there; (see section on classifications of students for directions about 
class advisers). Women then go to the Dean of Women for enroll- 
ment and consultation. 

FILING OF RECORDS 

Those students entering the Normal School for the first time 
should have sent to the Registrar of the Normal School, Miss Ethel 
Ice, a full description of the students' high school record. No certi- 
ficates can be issued and no grades recorded until this record has 
been received and filed. 

Those students who are entering the Normal School from some 
other advanced educational institution should have sent to the Regis- 
trar an official transcript of their high school credits and credits 
for advanced standing, then seme time during the summer term 
these persons should come before the Committee on Classification 
and Crdits to have their advanced work evaluated. 

CLASSIFICATION OF STUDENTS 

Each summer school student is counted a member of one of the 
following groups: college, second year normal, first year normal, 
short course. Each group has a faculty adviser. If you have already 
been given your classification at Fairmont Normal, you will know 
which class adviser to consult for your study assignments. If you 
have not been given your classification at Fairmont Normal, classify 
yourself tentatively by the following suggestions : 

1. If you have completed only your (high school work and are 
now beginning on a teachers course, you belong either to the short 
course group or to the first year normal group, depending upon 
whether you wish to enter upon the shorter course (approximately 
one year's work, designed for rural teachers) or (the longer course 
(approximately two years' work, designed for city teachers). 

2. If you have completed only your high school work and are 
attending the summer term to obtain a temporary certificate, join the 
first year normal group. 

3. If you have completed your high school course and as much 
as one year's normal school or college work, join the second year nor- 
mal group. 

4. If you have completed a standard normal course or two years 
of college work, join the college group. 

5. If you are in doubt about your classification, consult Mr. 
Rosier or Mr. Barnes. 



Temporary Certificates 

For the school year of 1927-28 the state will issue temporary 
certificates to students of Fairmont Normal, under the folowing con- 
ditions : 

FIRST GRADE TEMPORARY CERTIFICATE (Valid 1 year. 
Basic salary $85.00 per month). 

a. Graduation from first class high school. 

b. Must have completed 24 semester hours of collegiate credit 
including 8 semester hours in education earned in one of 
the following ways : 

(1) Three summer terms of nine weeks each in an ap- 
proved summer school. It is provided that the equiv- 
alent of one summer term's work may be earned by 
correspondence or extension. 

(2) Twenty-seven weeks in an approved teacher-training 
institution or in a normal training high school. 

SECOND GRADE TEMPORARY CERTIFICATE (Valid 1 year. 
Basic salary $65.00 per month). 

a. Graduation from, a first class high school. 

b. Must have completed 16 semester hours of collegiate credit 
including 8 semester hours in education earned in one of 
the following ways : 

(1) Two summer terms of nine weeks each in an ap- 
proved summer school. 

(2) Eighteen weeks in an approved teacher-training in- 
stitution or normal training high school. 

1. The HIGH SCHOOL COURSE required for all teachers' 
elementary school certificates must require 16 units of approved 
high school work including the following: English, 4 units; Social 1 
Studies, 2 units which must include American History and Civics or 
Government; Sciences, 1 unit; Mathematics, 1 unit, including % unit 
in Arithmetic; Vocational Subjects, 2 units. 

2. Applicants who have not completed certain required hinh school 
subjects may meet this requirement by substituting credit in corres- 
ponding subiects earned in college or normal school. 

3. Applicants for temporary certificates must have their work 
certified by high school principal on application blank (Application 
Form 4) and file with the Registrar of the summer school at begin- 
ning of summer term. 

It should be noted that no certificate of any kind may be secured 
by attendance at one summer term. Those p°rsons who have not at- 
tended any school beyond high school should therefore not attend the. 
summer school with the expectation of receiving certificates. 

RENEWAL OF CERTIFICATES 

The summer session at Fairmont Normal will permit holders of 
first and second grade temporary certificates to renew the certifi- 
cates. Eight semester hours, either academic or professional, will 
suffice for this renewal. 

SALARY INCREASES 

The Normal School will furnish statements of work done to 
meet the requirements of boards of education in making salary in- 
creases or in granting bonuses for summer school attendance. 



TRAINING SCHOOLS 

Practice and demonstration courses in both the elementary and 
the high school grades will be open to students enrolled in Education 
9 and Education 24. The White school in Fairmont will be used, with 
Mr. W. E. Buckey in charge. 

TUITION 

The tuition for the summer session will be ten dollars. This 
is payable on the date of enrollment. It includes all organization 
and class dues, lecture course assessment, and the support of all other 
student and school activities 



BOOKS 

The text books are to be purchased at the Normal School Book 
Store. Usually these will cost about eight or ten dollars. Note books 
and supplies can also be obtained at the Book Store. 

HOURS OF COURSES 

The classes at the summer session will begin at 7:20 A. M. and 
will continue until 3 o'clock P.- M. Most classes meet four days in the 
week. Seme courses are offered for a double period, that is, for two 
hours' continuous session. Courses cany a credit value of from one 
hour to four hours. No classes are held on Wednesday at the third 
period in the morning or -on Thursday at the fourth period in the 
morning. 

COURSES OFFERED 

The courses offered during the summer session are, for the most 
part, those regularly scheduled in the catalog for the year. So far 
as it can be determined, the courses offered for the summer session 
will be those that will be most valuable to the students attending the 
summer school. All the courses in Education will be offered and 
most of the courses in all other subjects. 

The normal student load for the nine weeks summer term will 
be eight semester hours. No one will be permitted to carry more than 
eight semester hours without permission of the Committee on Classi- 
fication and Credits. 

BOARD AND ROOM 

Morrow Hall, the women's dormitory, will probably have a few 
rooms available but no one should count upon being able to secure 
rooms there. Those who wish to do so may put their names on the 
waiting list, and it is possible that vacancies may occur at any time. 
A large number of homes in that part of Fairmont near the Normal 
School have rooms available for students. Room rent is on the aver- 
age two and a half dollars a week. Miss Dorcas Prichard, Dean of 
Women, has charge of the rooming facilities for students. It would 
be well for students who live near Fairmont to come to Fairmc<nt be- 
fore the summer school begins and have their rooms reserved,. If 
that is not possible, rooms may be secured when the student enrolls. 
Miss Prichard will not reserve rooms in advance through corre- 



spondence, as it is thought best for students to make personal ar- 
rangements for their own rooms, but she will send lists of rooming 
places. 

Beard may be obtained at various bearding houses and private 
hemes in the vicinity of the Normal School. The cafeteria, which has 
recently been moved into its quarters in the new wing of the Normal 
School, is prepared to serve meals to several hundred students at 
the noon hour and it is probable that the cafeteria will serve break- 
fast also if the demand is sufficient. Students, up to a certain num- 
ber, may secure board at Morrow Hall. 

STUDENT ACTIVITIES 

All the major activities of the regular school year will be car- 
ried on during the summer session. Among such activities may be 
mentioned the publication of the school paper, "The Columns"; the 
carrying on of the different types of club work; the social activities 
of the classes; the literary and dramatic entertainments by the stu- 
dents. A lecture course consisting of addresses by well known edu- 
cators has been outlined for the summer. 

The summer session at the Fairmont Normal has always been 
one of the pleasant periods of the school year. A large number of 
social events of different types has been provided for. Once a week 
the students give a general musical and literary program before the 
entire student body. Hikes and picnics and various out-of-door ex- 
cursions are featured. Campus singing and various other recrea- 
tional activities are engaged in. 

During the summer season the entire student body will be or- 
ganized under the Summer School Student Body constitution; the 
social cabinet consisting of the presidents of the different school or- 
ganizations will function as during the regular school year; the dif- 
ferent academic classes will be reorganized — in fact, all the vigorous 
and varied club and organizaticn life which distinguishes Fairmont 
Normal will be carried on during the summer session of the Normal. 

LIBRARY 

The new wing of the main building has been finished and will 
be occupied during the summer session. The main feature of the new 
wing is the large library and reading rocm, probably one of the best 
rooms of this type in any institution in this part of the country. The 
library of 9,030 volumes has been rearranged and reclassified, and 
many hundreds of additional volumes will be added before the sum- 
mer session begins. The new reading rocm has ample space for tak- 
ing care of the enlarged student body which will attend during the 
summer of 1927. 

The library will be kept open from early morning until late aft- 
ernoon and during one or two evenings of the week. 

For additional information write 

JOSEPH ROSIER, President, 

Fairmont, W. Va. 



SCHEDULE OF CLASSES 



7:20 



NAME 



CREDIT INSTRUCTOR ROOM 



Ed. 2 Ed. Psychology 4 

Ed. 3 Learning & Teaching 2% 

Ed. 3 Learning & Teaching 2V 2 

Ed. 7 Tunior High 2V 2 

Ed. 21 Adv. Ed. Psy. 4 

Eng. 2 Written English 2 

Eng. 31 Shakespeare 2V 2 

Chem. 2 Gen. Chemistry 4 

Hist. 4 Mod. Eur. Histoiy 4 

Home Ec. I. El. Cocking 4 

Math. I. Arithmetic 2V 2 

Nat. Study I Gen. Nat. Study 2 



Hyde 2 

B. Gibson 28 

Leonard 24 

Hull 25 

Shreve 22 

Lewis 26 

Patterson 27 

Haught 31 

Pence 20 

Gaskill 40 

G. Roberts 23 

C. Roberts 38 



Phys. Ed. 5 



Field trip, M. 1:00—4:00 
Gymnasium 1 Colebank Gym 

8:15 



Ed. 2 Ed. Psychology, Second half of double course 2 

Ed. 21 A.dv. Ed. Psy., Second half of double course 22 

Eng. 1 Oral English 2 Opp 3 

Eng. 8 Composition 2 x k Lev/is 26 



Eng. 39 



Survey of Lit. 4 



Patterson 27 

Biol. 16 _ __ Conservation _ 2 C. Roberts 38 

Chem. 2 Gen. Chem, Second half of double course 32 

Hist. 4 Mod. Eu. Hist., Second half of double course 20 

Home Ec. I El. Cookery, Second third of three-hour course- _40 

Math. I. Arithmetic 2V 2 G. Roberts 23 

Phys. Ed. I. Health 1 Hammond 4 

Phys. Ed. 25 Group Games 1 Coleban ( k Gvm 

Soc. I. Soc. Rela. (M.W.) 1 

Soc. 6 In. to Sociology 4 



Prichard _ __28 
Lively 21 



9:10 



Ed. J 

Ed. i 

Eng. 

Eng. 

Eng. 

Art. 

Biol. 



Ed. Psychology 4 

Ed. Measurement 2 

2 Written English 2 

10 Recent Fiction 2 



Chem. I. 



A. J. Gibson 4 

Shurtleff 3 

Tate 28 

Mercer 25 



Survey of Lit., Second half of double course 27 

Art. Appreciation 2 Briggs 39 

Systematic Botanv 4 C. Roberts 38 

Field trip, W. 1:00—4:00 

Gen. Chemistry 4 Rogers 32 

Hist. 26 H. Sch. Hist. Meth. ___2 Boughter 24 

Home Ec. I. El. Cooking, Last third of three-hour course 40 



Home Ec. 31 Home Planning 2 

Math. 5 Solid Geom. 4 

Physics I. Gen. Physics 4 

Phys. Ed. 2 Hygiene 2 

Phys. Ed. 20 ___ Dancing 1 

Pol. Science 2 __ State & Local Gov. 4 



Compton 34 

G. Roberts 23 

Haught 31 

Colebank 2 

Hammond Gym 

Pence 20 



Soc. 6 In. to Sociology, Second half of double course. 



.21 



10:05 



Ed. 2 . 
Ed. 2 . 
Ed. 6 . 
Ed. 20 
Eng. I. 



Eng. 5 Grammar 2 

Eng. 11 Recent Poetry 2 

Eng. 41 Exposition 2 

Art. 3 & 4 Construction 1 



Psychology, Second half of double course 4 

Shurtleff 21 

Hall Aud 

Hyde 2 

Opp _ 3 



Ed. 

Ed. Psychology ._4 

-Sch. Management 4 

.Sec. Sch. Methods 4 

Oral English 2 



Biol. 9s Botany, 

Chem. 

Home 

Math. 

Math. 

Music 

Physics I 

Phys. Ed. 



Lewis 26 

Mercer 25 

Tate 28 

Briggs 39 



Pol. Science 
Psy. 20 ___ 



Second half of double course 38 

I. Gen. Chemistry, Second half of double course 32 

Ec. 2 El. Clothing 4 Compton 34 

5 Solid Geom., Second half of double course 23 

24 College Algebra 4 McCarty 27 

20 Music Appreciation 2 Price 36 

Gen. Physics, Second half of double course 31 

23s --Corn. Recreations 1 Hammond Gym 



State & Local Govt., Second half of double course 20 
.Psych, of Child 4 Shreve 22 



11:00 



Ed. Psychology, Second half of double course 21 

Sch. Manaa;em't, Second half of double course__Aud 
Sec. Sch. Methods, Second half of double course- _ 2 

Tate 28 



Ed. 2 

Ed. 6 

Ed. 20 

Eng. 3 Story Telling 2 

Eng. 12 Modern Magazine 2 

Eng. 13 Recent Drama 2 

Eng. 42 Public Speaking 2 

Art 5 El. Art Methods 1 

Hist. 27 Interpretation of Hist. 2 

Home Ec. 2 El. Clothing, Second third of three-hour course 34 

Math. 24 Coll. Algebra, Second half of double course 27 

Music 10 Ear Training 2 Price 30 

Phys. Ed. 2 Hygiene 2 Colebank 4 

Phys. Ed. 3 Prim. Methods 1 Hammond Gym 

Psychology 20 __Psych. of Child, Second half of double course 22 

Soc. I. Soc. Rela. (M.W.) 1 Prichard 23 



Lewis 26 

Mercer 25 

Opp 3 

Briggs 39 

Boughter 24 



1:00 



Ed. 6 Sch. Management 

Ed. 8 Ed. Measurements 

Ed 22 Prin. Sec. Edu. __. 

Eng. 5 Grammar 



Eng. 45 Dramatization 2 

Art. 5 El. Art Methods 1 

Chem. 27 Physiological Chem. __4 

Hist. 10 W. Va. History 4 

Home Ec. 2 El. Clothing, Last third of three-hour course__ __34 

Math. 20 Trigonometry 4 McCarty 27 

Music 2 El. Music Meth. 1 Price 36 

Soc. 25s Mod. Soc. Progress ___4 Lively 21 



4 Hall 22 

.2 Shurtleff 23 

.4 Gibson 4 

.2 Mercer 25 

Opp 3 

Briggs 39 

Rogers 32 

Boughter 24 



2:00 

Ed. 6 Sch. Managem't, Second half of double course 22 

Ed. 22 Prin. Sec. Ed., Second half of double course 4 

Eng. 4 Ch. Literature 2 Tate 28 

Chem. 27 Physi. Chem., Second half of double course 32 

Hist. 10 W. Va. Hist., Second half of double course 24 

Math. 20 Trigonometry, Second half of double course 27 

Music 2 El. Music Methods 1 Price 36 

Phys. Ed. 4 Up. Grade Methods 1 Hammond Gym 

Soc. 25s Mod. Social Pro., Second half of double course 21 



3:00 

Music 3 Glee Club (M.W.) V 2 Price 36 

Music 5 Orchestra (T.Th.) V 2 Price 36 



FAIRMONT, 







msEmMsmB^mmmmm mmmmMMmMmmmMm M 



Fairmont 



State Normal School 

A Teachers College 




FAIRMONT, WEST VIRGINIA 
1927 - 1928 



fife 



** 



>Xe2B 



y-r ir -_ r - T7 ^ <^-^ r ~< ^ , ,_* .,._-_ :Prrr --- 1 r-Pr~-Tn-Tp- -nrr— ^-,-r-r -- 



| 

Fairmont 
State Normal School I 

y4 Teachers College 




FAIRMONT, WEST VIRGINIA 
/927 - 1928 



mm 



AN EXPLANATORY FOREWORD 



Since some misunderstanding seems to prevail about 
the present status of Fairmont Normal, an explanation 
is desirable. 

The name of this school remains as it was : "Fairmont 
State Normal School"; and it will so remain until it is 
changed by act of the West Virginia Legislature. But 
the school, by official act of the State Board of Educa- 
tion, has been given permission to add two years of col- 
lege work and to grant the degree of A. B. in Education, 
and the first degrees were granted in June of 1924. This 
institution, therefore, while a Normal School in name, is 
in reality a teachers college. It has Class "A" standing 
in the AJmerican Association of Teachers Colleges and in 
the Southern Association of Teacher Training Institutions, 
and graduates enter advanced schools of Education with- 
out conditions. 

The change in the status of the institution does not 
mean that the established normal courses for the train- 
ing of elementary teachers have been eliminated; it means 
merely that Fairmont Normal has added to its established 
courses another course, a course to train supervisors and 
teachers for junior and senior high schools. 

Fairmont Normal is, therefore, still a teacher-training 
institution, not at all a general, liberal-arts college. But 
those who do not desire to teach may nevertheless attend 
the school and secure college credit for the academic work 
they take. Two or three years of college credit may thus 
be earned. 



CALENDAR FOR 1927-28. 



First Semester opens September 13. 
Christmas vacation 'begins December 16. 
School resumes January 3. 
First Semester closes January 27. 
Second Semester opens January 30. 
Spring vacation begins April 18. 
Spring Term opens April 24. 
Commencement, June 7. 
Summer Term opens June 11. 
Summer Term closes August 10. 

The regular school year is divided into two semesters 
of eighteen weeks each. But beginnnig on April 24 a 
special spring term of six weeks and beginning on June 
11 a special term of nine weeks are held. 

On Tuesday, September 13, all first year students, 
and all others entering Fairmont Normal for the first 
time, will be enrolled. On Wednesday, September 14, all 
other students will be enrolled. On Thursday, September 
15, classes will start. All first year students will take 
examinations in English 1, and English 2 on Wednesday, 
September 14. 



THE STATE BOARD OF CONTROL 



JAMES S. LAKIN, President Charleston 

F. W. McCULLOUGH, Treasurer Charleston 

C. A. JACKSON Charleston 

ROY REGER, Secretary Charleston 

The State Board of Control has charge of the finan- 
cial and business affairs of all the State institutions. 



THE STATE BOARD OF EDUCATION 



GEORGE] M. FORD, President Charleston 

J. B. MCLAUGHLIN Gassaway 

WILLIAM G. CONLEY Charleston 

W. C. COOK Welch 

BERNARD McCLAUGHERTY Bluefield 

JOHN H. GORBY New Martinsville 

MRS. LENA LOWE YOST Huntington 

J. FRANK MARSH, Secretary Charleston 

The State Board of Education has charge of all mat- 
ters of a purely scholastic nature concerning the State 
educational institutions. 



FACULTY 1926-27 



Joseph Rosier President 

P. Pd. Salem College 1895, A. M. Salem College 
1915. Superintendent Salem Public Schools 1891- 
1893; City (Superintendent Salem Public Schools 
1891-1893; County Superintendent Harrison 
County Schools 1893-1896; instructor Glenville 
State Normal School 1895-1896; instructor in 
Fairmont State Normal School 1896-1900; Super- 
intendent City Schools of Fairmont 1900-1915; 
present posiiton 1915. 

Walter Barnes, Dean of Instruction, Head English Dept. 
A. B. West Virginia University 1905, A. M. 
Harvard 1911. Four years in rural and village 
schools, principal Keyser High School 1905-1906; 
Superintendent Salem Public Schools 1906-1907; 
asistant Principal and head of English Depart- 
ment Glenville State Normal School, 1907-1914; 
assistant to the president, head of the English 
Department Fairmont State Normal School, 1914; 
Dean of College 1'923; instructor in summer 
school West Virginia University, 1914, 1915, 
1917; in State Normal School at Towson, Mary- 
land, 1916, in University of Pittsburgh 1918, in 
University of Pennsylvania, 1920-1921; in Chicago 
University 1922; present position 1914. 

I. F. Boughter History 

A. B. Lebanon Valley College 1919; A. M. Uni- 
versity of Pittsburgh 1922; Graduate Study Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania 1925-26; Principal Town- 
ship Schools Corydon, Pa., 1919-21; History De- 
partment Salem College 1922-25; Instructor Uni- 
versity of Pennsylvania 1925-26; present posi- 
tion 1926. 

Laura E. Briggs Art 

Student at Ferris Institute, Big Rapids, Michi- 
gan; State Normal, Kalamazoo, Michigan; Uni- 
versity (summer) Ann Arbor, Michigan; Art 
Institute (summer) Chicago, Illinois; Columbia 
(summer) New York City. Six years supervisor 
Music and Drawing, seven years Supervisor Art, 
Fairmont High School; present position 1918. 



Fairmont State Normal School 



Jasper H. Colebank Physical Education 

A. OB. Fairmont Normal 1926; taught seven years 
in rural schools, Lumberport High School 1016- 
1917, Washington Irving High School, 1917-18, 
U. S. Army 1918, Grafton High School 1919-24; 
present position 1924. 

Eva Day Compton Home Economics 

B. S. West Virginia University 1919; A. M. 
Teachers College, Columbia University, 1025; 
Piedmont High School 1916-1917; Keyser High 
School 1917-20; present position 1021. 

Helen H. Fptzgibbon Geography 

B. S. 1924, A. M. 1926 George Peabody College 
for Teachers; one year iBiology Laboratory assist- 
ant Peabody College; present position 1926. 

Virginia Gaskill Home Economics 

Household Arts Diploma Mechanics Institute 
1016; B. S. Columbia University 1924; A. M. Co- 
lumbia 1925; Fairmont High School 1016-19; in- 
structor in summer school Concord Normal 1917- 
1918; present position 1919. 

Mary Blanche Gibson — Edu.; Hostess at Morrow Hall 

A. B. West Virginia University 1922; A. M. 
Teachers College Columbia University 1926. Five 
years in one room country school; eight years 
in graded schools; one year principal of graded 
school; one year principal of high school; pres- 
ent position 1921. 

Katherine May Hammond Physical Education 

B. S. and 1 Diploma Teachers College, Columbia 
University; Diploma Sargent Normal School. 
One summer session at New Haven School of 
Gymnastics. Experience includes teaching in 
private school, teaching and supervising in a city 
school system, teaching in state teachers colleges 
and instructing in summer and normal school 
camps. Present position 1926. 



Fairmont State Normal School 



C. 0. Haught —Physics; Chemistry 

A. B. West Virginia Wesleyan College 1922; M. 
S. Ohio State University 1925. One year teacher 
in rural schools of Marion County, two years 
teacher of chemistry and physics, Mannington 
'High School, graduate assistant in chemistry 
Ohio State University 1924-1925; present position 
1025. 

Richard Elkins Hyde Education 

A. B. West Virginia University 1921; graduate 
work Johns Hopkins University, summers of 
1921, 1922, 1923; A. M. Teachers College, Co- 
lumbia University, 1923-1924. Instructor in Eng- 
lish and assistant principal Center District High 
School, Pineville, 1021-1923; Mullens High School, 
Mullens, 1924-1925; present position 1925. 

Maude M. Hull Education 

A. B. West Virginia University 1919; summer 
school Columbia University 1921-1922; A. M. 
Teachers College, Columbia University 1925. Four 
years in one-room country schools; three years 
in village graded schools; six years in the train- 
ing school of the Fairmont State Normal School; 
four years in the Education Department of High 
Schools; present position 1921. 

Ethel Ice French; Registrar 

A. B. West Virginia University 1910; A. M. 
Teachers College, Columbia University 1921. 
One year in one-room country schools; two years 
in graded schools; two years in Clarksburg High 
School; present position 1912. 

Louise Leonard Education 

A. OB. in Education Fairmont State Normal 
School 1924, summer session Teachers College 
Columbia University 1924; taught several years 
in elementary schools including some years as 
critic teacher in (Butcher School, Fairmont; pres- 
ent position 1924. 



Fairmont State Normal School 



Laura F. Lewis .—-English 

A. B. West Virginia University 1907; A. M. Co- 
lumbia University 1918. Five years teaching in 
ungraded rural schools; two years principal of 
graded rural schools in Harrison County; three 
years in graded city schools at Mannington; 
three years in Fairmont High School; one year 
in Denominational College, Ohio Valley; seven- 
teen years in state normal schools; one year in 
West Virginia University; present position 1913. 

E. L. Lively Sociology 

B. iS. West Virginia University 1912; A. M. Ohio 
State University 1920. Five years in public 
schools; three years principal of junior high; two 
years high school; present position 1912. 

E. E. Mercer Mathematics; Latin 

A. B. University of Nashville 1891; student 
Harvard summer school, summers of 1904-1906. 
Teacher in Waco College, Waco, Texas, 1892- 
1893; principal of schools, Berkeley Springs, W. 
Va., 1893-1895; teacher in Fairmont State Nor- 
mal 1895-1899; principal Fairmont High School 
1899-1901; present position 1901. 

M. E. McCarty Mathematcis; Director of Extension 

A. B. University of Michigan 1915; A. M. Uni- 
versity of Michigan 1922. Principal of graded 
schools of Wetzel County 1909-12; rural schools 
of West Virginia 1902-1907; principal of High 
School, Williamson, W. Va., 1915-23; present 
position 1923. 

Mrs. N. R. C. Morrow English; Chaplain 

(Ph. B. University of Chicago 1917; A. M. Beaver 
College 1®90; post-graduate work University of 
Chicago; studied in the West Virginia University 
and Columbia University; present position 1906. 

Paul F. Opp English; Director of Publicity 

A. B. Mt. Union College 1918; A. M. Columbia 
University 1923; Professional Diploma, Teacher 
of English Columbia University 1923; Squadron 
Athletic Director U. S. Navy one year; Farming- 
ton High School English Department one year; 
present position 1923. 



Fairmont State Normal School 



John W. Pence History and Political Science 

A. B. Oberlin College, 1917; A. M. Oberlin Col- 
lege, 1923; Carnegie Fellowship in International 
Law, Columbia University, 1917-1918; Overseas 
War Service, 1918-1919; Valuation Accountant, 
Cities Service Company, 1919-1921; Head of De- 
partment of History and Economics, Yankton 
College College, 1921-1923; Head of Department 
of Economics, Kansas City Municipal University, 
1923-1926; Instructor, Central Missouri State 
Teachers College, summer sessions, 1924-1926; 
present position 1926. 

Mary B. Price Music 

Graduate of the School of Music, West Virginia 
University (violin) 1917. Summer session Cornell 
University, 1918. Graduate of Pennsylvania sum- 
mer session for Public School Music Supervisors, 
West Chester, Pa., 1923. Studied voice with 
Helen Allen Hunt, of Boston, 1922-23, and with 
Isidore Luckstone, New York City, 1924-25. Post 
graduate work New York University, New York 
City, 1925. Music Teacher in Clay County High 
School, Clay, 1917-1918. Supervisor of music in 
public schools, Follansbee, 1918-19; Bramwelil, 
1919-21. Supervisor of Junior High Music, Mor- 
gantown, 19*21-24; present position 1925. 

Mahala Dorcas Prichard Dean of Women; History 

A. B. West Virginia University; A. M. Teachers 
College Columbia University; Professional Diplo- 
ma, Dean of Women, Columbia University. Three 
years in public schools; present position 1912. 

Edna Richmond Education 

A. B. in Education Fairmont State Normal 
(School 1925, three summer sessions Teachers 
College Columbia University. Taught several 
years in elementary schools including some years 
as critic teacher; present position 1925. 

Charles M. Roberts Biology and Nature Study 

B. S, Pennsylvania State College, 1924; M. S. 
Pennsylvania iState College, 1925; University of 
Michigan Biology Station, summer, 1924; gradu- 
ate assistant, Botany Dept. University of Wash- 
ington, 1925; assistant in botany, Puget Sound 
Biological Station, summer, 1925; vocational 
agriculture, Corry High School, Corry, Pa., 1925- 
26; present position spring 1926. 



10 Fairmont State Normal School 



Harold F. Rogers Head of Chemistry Department 

A. B. West Virginia University 1901; A. M. Har- 
vard 1908; studied and practiced pharmacy, 
summer 1896-1906 and the year following gradu- 
ation at West Virginia University. Instructor of 
Physics and Chemistry, Fairmont State Normal 
School, 1905-1904; similar position Glenville State 
Normal School, 1905-1906; assistant principal, 
ibid. 1905-1906; West Virginia University 1919- 

1920, and twelve weeks summer term 1920; 
present position 1908. 

Francis Shreve Head of Education Department 

A. B. West Virginia University 1909; A. M. Ohio 
State University 1912; Ph. D. Peabody College 

1921. Four years in rural schools; three years 
principal of elementary schools; one year princi- 
pal of high school; two years Professor of Edu- 
cation, Wesleyan College; present position 1915. 

♦Watt Stewart Head of History Department 

A. B. West Virginia Wesleyan, 1920; A. M. Uni- 
versity of Chicago. Three years in graded 
schools; present position 1923. 

* Leave of absence 1926-27. 

Marjorie D. Tate English 

B. S. Central Missouri State Teachers College, 
Warrensburg, Missouri, 1922. M. A. George Pea- 
body College, 1926. Three years in elementary 
schools; five and one-half years in secondary 
schools; present position 1926. 

Frank S. White Education 

A. IB. University of Pittsburgh 1916; A. M. 
George Peabody College 1923. Rural Schools of 
Wood and Harrison Counties; principal of 
iShinnston Schools 1903-1904; principal of Adam- 
ston School 1904-1907; principal of Northview 
School 1907-1908; assistant principal of Fleming- 
ton High School 1909-1911; principal of Barnes 
School, Fairmont 1913-1917; present position 
1917. 



Fairmont State Normal School 11 

Kathryn Beltzhoover Piano and Organ 

Graduate Shepherd College; Randolph-Macon 
Women's College; Graduate West Virginia Uni- 
versity School of Music in Piano and Organ; 
Graduate New England Conservatory in Piano. 

Kathryn Browning, A. B., W. V. U Dietitian 

♦Mrs. Emory F. McKinney Librarian 

Blanche Price Bursar 

Katherine Lloyd Secretary 

Additional Summer Term Instructors, 1926 

W. E. Buckey, Prin. Fairmont High School Education 

A. J. Gibson, Prin. East Side High School Education 

Frank Hall, Prin. Berkeley Springs High 

School Education 

L. B. Hill, Education Department, West Vir- 
ginia University Education 

Oliver Shtjrtleff, Supt. Schools, Sutton Education 

Mary Shurtlefp, Normal Training, Sutton Education 

C. C. Miller, Columbus, Ohio History 

B. F. Kahn, Fairmont High School Mathematics 

Charlotte M. Skinner, Dunkirk, N. Y Penmanship 

Teachers in the elementary schools at Jayenne and 
Barrackville and in the Butcher School in Fairmont, and 
certain teachers in the high schools at Barrackville and 
East Side, Fairmont, are listed as part-time members of 
the faculty. 

♦Died 1927. 



FACULTY COMMITTEES FOR 1927-28 



Classification and Credits — Normal School Section 



Mr. Lively 
Mr. Hyde 



Miss Compton 
Miss Ice 



Mr. Barnes 
Classification and Credits — Teachers College Section 



Mr. Rogers 
Mr. Shreve 



Mr. Pence 
Miss Ice 



Mr. McCarty 



Miss B. Price 



Mr. Colebank 



Miss Prichard 



Mr. Lively 



Librarian 



Mrs. Morrow 



Mr. Rogers 



Mr. Barnes 
Placement of Graduates 

Miss Gibson 

Employment for Students 

Miss Prichard 
Athletics 
Miss Hammond 

Social 
Miss Beltzhoover 
Lecture Course 
Miss Briggs 
Library 
Mr. Boughter 

Assembly 

Miss M. Price 

Commencement 

Miss Tate 

Health 

Members to be appointed 



Mr. Barnes 



Mr. Rosier 



Mr. Lively 



Mr. Opp 



Miss Ice 



Mr. Shreve 



Miss Compton 



Miss Briggs 



CLASS ADVISERS 



{Mr. Hyde 
Mr. Roberts 
Miss Gibson 



/Mr. Lively 

Normal Senior JjJ ISS g 1 * 8 ™ 

j Miss Hull 

(Miss Leonard 

College Freshmen Mr. Rogers 

College Sophomore Mr. White 

College Junior Mr. Haught 

College Senior Mr. Shreve 



INSTRUCTIONS TO PROSPECTIVE STUDENTS 



Read this catalog and the student hand-book through 
carefully, then if there are any questions you wish to ask, 
write directly to Joseph Rosier, President State Normal 
School, Fairmont, West Virginia. 

The following classes of students are eligible for en- 
trance at Fairmont Normal: 

1. High school graduates. 

2. High school students who have finished 15 unit3 
of high school work. (Such students must make up an 
additional unit of credit by summer school work during 
the first year.) 

3. Persons eighteen years of age or over who have 
not finished a high school course. (But such persons 
cannot graduate from any course until they have credti 
for a high school course.) 

If you are to stay at home while attending the Nor- 
mal, you need not make any arrangements previous to 
enrolling. Come to the Normal School building on Sep- 
tember 13 or as soon thereafter as possible, and directions 
for enrolling will be given you after you arrive at the 
building. 

If you are not to remain at home while you are 
attending Normal School, it is best to make arrangements 
for room and board before you come to Fairmont. All 
young women entering the Normal will be expected to 
engage rooms at the woman's hall, unless they have per- 
mission to stay with relatives or friends in the city. In 
any case you should write Miss Dorcas Prichard, Dean 
of Women, concerning the place where you are to stay 
while a student in the Normal. 

If you are a graduate of a four-year high school, you 
become, upon your entrance, a member of the Junior 
Normal or the Freshman College class. Your high school 
grades will be accepted at their full value, regardless of 
what the subjects are. Ask the principal of the high 
school from which you graduated to send a full and ac- 
curate statement of all the work you did, to Miss Ethel 
Ice, Registrar. If possible, have this done before you 
enter the Normal School. 

If you have done advanced work in some college or 
normal school of approved standing, the work you have 
done there will be accepted at its full value on either Nor- 



Fairmont State Normal School 15 



mal or College courses. Have all the credits you have at 
other institutions certified to the Registrar of the Nor- 
mal. When you send in this statement, request that the 
committee on classifications and credits pass upon your 
credits and give you your rating. This committee will 
tell you how much work you have to complete to finish 
the course you wish to enter. (But see pages 37 and 33 
for residence requirements.) 



INFORMATION FOR NEW STUDENTS 

The Fairmont Normal Hand-hook contains detailed 
information concerning the regulations and customs of 
the school. Students should secure and study this hand- 
book as soon as they enter school. 

It is especially desirable that students enroll on the 
first day of the semester or term. On only that one day 
an effective system of enrolling students rapidly and 
accurately is in motion; after that day students have to 
await the leisure of class adviser, secretary, and regis- 
trar. Moreover, students who enroll late sometimes find 
that certain courses which they desire to take have al- 
ready been filled to capacity. After the first four weeks 
of a semester no one is permitted to enroll except by 
permission of the dean of instruction. 

Students are supervised in their study assignments by 
their class advisers. No change of any kind can be made 
in the study assignment except by permission of these 
class advisers, and no change can be made after four 
weeks of the semester have elapsed except by permission 
of the dean of instruction. 

New students should not ask to carry more than 16 
hours' work. 

Text books and school supplies may be purchased in 
the Administration building. 

Students are expected to attend the classes regularly 
and to keep up their work. Teachers report to the dean 
of instruction any failure to live up to this standard. If, 
after a reasonable time, the student is still indifferent, 
he may be asked to discontinue certain courses or to with- 
draw from the school. 

When students are compelled to be absent for a few 
days, they should, upon their return to school, confer 
with their instructors about the work they have missed. 
When they are absent for several days or longer, they 
should, upon their return, report to the dean of instruc- 
tion. 



16 Fairmont State Normal School 

When students are at the school building, they are 
expected to be in class, in the library, in the rooms 
appointed for discussion and study, or in authorized extra- 
curricular activities or organizations. 

The grading system is as follows: "A" excellent; "B" 
good; "C" average; "D" fair; "Cond" conditioned; "E" 
failure. The teacher may, at his discretion, give less 
credit to any student than the course usually carries; 
he may, for example, cut down to one, two, or three 
semester 'hours the credit in a four-hour course. 

Any "condition" must be removed by the middle of 
the term or semester following; otherwise the condition 
automatically becomes a failure. 

Students who fail to pass as much as one-half of the 
total number of hours assigned to them are not permitted 
to enroll for the following semester without permission 
of the dean of instruction. Students who leave school_or 
drop out of any course without permission of the dean 
of instruction are marked "E" in the courses they are 
enrolled for. 

At each mid-semester the parents or guardians of 
those students who are not doing satisfactory class work 
are notified by telephone or letter that at that time the 
students' work is unsatisfactory. At the end of each 
semester a report of credits and grades for all students 
is mailed to parents and guardians. 

Upon the students is placed the responsibility of con- 
forming to the graduation requirements. Class advisers 
will assist their students in this matter, but the students 
are held directly responsible. Each student should study 
the curriculum he is pursuing and make sure that he is 
taking the requisite amount of work including the re- 
quired work. Only the committee of classification and 
credits can make changes in the graduation requirements 
for any student. 

All persons who expect to receive diplomas or de- 
grees are required to be present at the commencement 
sermon and at the graduating exercises. 

The committee on placement of graduates assists 
students in securing positions to teach. The committee, 
however, accepts no responsibility in the matter and does 
not promise to secure positions; its function is to assist 
and collaborate with the students. 

General assembly is held once a week, on Thursday 
morning at ten o'clock. Students who are in the adminis- 
tration building at that hour are expected to attend this 
assembly. 



Fairmont State Normal School 17 



THE FUNCTION AND PLACE OF THE SCHOOL 



Fairmont State Normal (School exists to prepare 
teachers. More specifically, it exists to prepare teachers 
and supervisors for the elementary and high schools of 
central and northern West Virginia. It is not in any 
sense a competitor with the high schools of the state or 
with liberal arts colleges or professional institutions of 
the state; it has its own special field of endeavor and is 
satisfied to cultivate that field. 

The Normal School graduates about two hundred and 
fifty teachers every year. It sends out, to most of the 
counties in West Virginia, well-prepared and well-trained 
young men and women to teach and supervise teaching 
in the cities, villages, and rural communities.. The work 
of the Normal School is thus affecting the educational 
conditions all over this section of the state. 

The normal school is always the pivotal point of a 
public school system. If the normal school is ineffective, 
the entire school system suffers directly and seriously. 
The preparation and training of teachers is therefore an 
absolute essential to the success of a system of public 
education. Fairmont Normal School clearly recognizes 
this fact, and is endeavoring to discharge the tremendous 
responsibilities committed to its charge. 

The Normal has fitted itself into the public school 
system of the state and articulates perfectly with all 
other parts of the system. It gives graduates of four- 
year high schools entrance without examinations or con- 
ditions or stipulation as to what subjects they must have 
had; it sets up no arbitrary standards, it makes no at- 
tempt to influence in this way the curriculum of the pub- 
lic schools. It has a special one-year course for those 
who wish to teach in villages or the country; it encourages 
specialization in definite kinds of teaching; it provides 
work in physical training, children's games, story-telling, 
music, drawing, English, in nearly all the high school 
subjects of various kinds — in fact, whenever it has been 
possible, the Normal has endeavored to prepare teachers 
in all the new subjects and for all the new duties as 
they have been made apparent. Whenever it is evident 
that a desirable change in the public school system has 
taken place or is afoout to take place, Fairmont Normal 
does its utmost to adjust its work, its ideals, its tradi- 
tions, to this change. 



18 Fairmont State Normal School 



One of the ways in which Fairmont Normal is of a 
special service to the teaching profession is in its help- 
fulness to teachers already in service. There are always 
many teachers who cannot afford to attend school for 
an entire year at one time. Through its special spring 
iand summer terms, and through its correspondence and 
extension classes, the Normal iSchool comes to the aid 
of such teachers, making it possible for them to continue 
their academic and professional studies. 



IDEALS AND SPIRIT OF THE SCHOOL 

Every educational institution develops, in the course 
of years, a distinctive and characteristic "school spirit". 
It is this, rather than the buildings or equipment or the 
faculty, which most clearly distinguishes one school from 
another and gives each school almost a personal in- 
dividuality. 

Fairmont Normal's school spirit is well-known; the 
unusual ideals and traditions of the school are almost 
immediately perceived by the new student or the visitor. 
The spirit is attractive and wholesome, and it accounts 
for the feeling of intense loyalty and devotion which 
students and graduates show for the school. 

Very prominent in Fairmont Normal is the richness 
and fineness of the social life of the students. For years 
it has been the tradition that Fairmont Normal students 
should engage in many diversified social activities, that 
Fairmont Normalites be acquainted with the best usages 
and trained in good breeding and the social arts. The 
authorities of the school believe that this is an important 
part of the education of any young man or woman, par- 
ticularly of anyone preparing to teach. Parties, recep- 
tions, teas, picnics, formal and informal gatherings of 
various sorts are therefore recognized and encouraged 
as an essential feature in the life of Fairmont Normal — 
all of these being subject to the direction and supervision 
of the Dean of Women and the iSocial Committee of the 
Faculty. 

Another noticeable quality of the life at Fairmont 
Normal is the student freedom that prevails. The faculty 
governs by suggestion and advice rather than by rules 
and strict regulations, thus throwing the responsibility 
for conduct largely upon the students themselves. Visitors 
to the Normal School are always impressed by the lack 



Fairmont State Normal School 19 



of friction, by the absence of visible authority, by the 
fact that the school seems to "run itself". As a result 
of this liberality and freedom from imposed discipline, 
there have been few serious cases of misconduct or severe 
punishment at the Normal for several years. The authori- 
ties of the school believe that by thus giving the students 
more freedom of government and by placing more and 
more responsibility upon them as they show themselves 
worthy of it, they will be better prepared for assuming 
the duties of teaching and the better prepared to accept 
responsibility and to display initiative. 

A third feature of the school life at Fairmont Nor- 
mal is the excellent quality of the studentship. Hard, 
earnest, serious work is expected and exacted of the stu- 
dents. Those who are not willing to work diligently in 
the class _ room and in the many student activities and 
organizations, are not invited to attend Fairmont Normal. 
The life of the average student at this institution is a 
very busy one; that is one of rtihe traditions of the school, 
it is a part of the school spirit. 

Finally, as Fairmont Normal is a teachers' school, the 
"atmosphere" is distinctly professional. "Teaching" is 
the subject most talked about throughout the school; the 
ambitions and hopes of every student center in teaching; 
it is the common goal of all. In consequenoe, there is 
a unanimity of purpose and effort, a singleness of aim 
that inspires all who attend the school &nd gives them 
zeal and enthusiasm for teaching. 



20 Fairmont State Normal School 



HISTORY OF THE SCHOOL 



Provisions for the establishment of the Fairmont 
Normal School were made by the State Legislature of 
1867, and an appropriation was provided for the inaugu- 
ration of the work of the school. In the Act providing 
for the school, its purpose was declared to be that of 
educating and training teachers in the improved methods 
of instruction and discipline that would be of the best 
service to the common schools of the State. For more 
than fifty years the Normal School has striven to carry 
forward the purpose of its founders. Thousands of young 
men and women have been enrolled as students, and have 
felt the influence of the instruction which has been given, 
and thousands have been graduated and are engaged in 
the different vocations of the State, exerting wide in- 
fluence in public affairs. From the beginning, the Nor- 
mal School gave prominence to the idea of teacher train- 
ing, with the result that the graduates of the school are 
very prominent in the educational work of the State. 
The men and women whose names have appeared in the 
list of faculties have been widely known for their ability 
and scholarship, and the instruction which has been given 
by them has been far reaching in its effects. 

In material and equipment, the Normal School has 
made steady advancement. In 1872 an appropriation was 
made by the State Legislature for the erection of a new 
building in conjunction with the local Board of Education. 
The building was completed and occupied in June, 1873. 
For many years, the building standing at the corner of 
Main and Quincy streets, housed both the Normal School 
and the Public Schools of Fairmont. It has been entirely 
abandoned for school use. In the year 1893 the Normal 
School was moved into a new building on Fairmont Ave- 
nue, between Second and Third streets. Several years 
ago the State authorities recognized the need of the in- 
stitution for a larger site, with more room for builidngs. 
The Board of Control, therefore, was authorized by the 
State Legislature to purchase new grounds at the far end 
of Locust Avenue, on the west side of Fairmont. The 
new site consists of about forty-five acres of ground ideal- 
ly located for the institution. In January, 1917, the 
Normal School was moved into the magnificent new build- 
ing, which is to be its home in the future. Since that 
time a temporary gymnasium and a permanent girls' 
dormitory have been constructed. 



Fairmont State Normal School 21 



The curriculum has steadily been enlarged and im- 
proved to keep pace with the needs of the times. For 
many years the curriculum was parallel to that of a high 
school. About 1912 a year's work was added, making it 
necessary for graduates of a standard high school to 
spend one year in the Normal. About 1915 another year's 
work was added, bringing the school up to standard nor- 
mal work. In 1920 the high school, or academic depart- 
ment was discontinued. The last step was taken in 1923. 
At this time the Normal School was granted permission 
to offer a four-year college course and to grant the A. B. 
degree in Education. The first college degrees, six in 
number, were granted in 1924; in 1925 twenty-two degrees 
were granted; in 1926, forty- two; in 1927, fifty-four. 



LOCATION 



The Fairmont State Normal School is located at Fair- 
mont, West Virginia, on the Monongahela River, near the 
junction of the Tygarts Valley and West Fork Rivers. 
It is on the main line of the Baltimore and Ohio Railroad, 
and at the terminus of the Monongahela Railroad. It 
may be reached on the Monongahela West Penn Public 
Service Company interurban lines from Weston, Bridge- 
port, Clarksburg, Mannington, and Fairview, and by bus 
from Morgantown. It is the geographical center of one 
of the most populous sections of the state. Clarksburg, 
Grafton, Elkins, Mannington, Moundsville, Wheeling, 
Parkersburg and other important towns and cities are 
within a short distance; Fairmont is one of the most ac- 
cessible cities of the State. 

Fairmont is a busy, modern, progressive city of about 
25,000 population, with a commission form of govern- 
ment, electric lighting, pure water supply — all the advan- 
tages and conveniences of a modern urban community. 
It has many fine churches of different denominations, and 
it has one of the best public school systems in the coun- 
try. Its population is composed of an enterprising and 
wide-awake class of people. Its citizens take an active 
interest in education and all movements for the advance- 
ment of the community and state. Many of America's 
famous public men and women and most noted speakers 
'have been brought to Fairmont by some of the city's clubs 
and societies. For these reasons, it is an especially favor- 
able location for an educational institution. 



22 Fairmont State Normal School 



BUILDINGS AND CAMPUS 

The main building is a fine example of classic archi- 
tecture, and is one of the finest public buildings that has 
been erected by the State. With its architectural beauty 
it combines a practical arrangement and equipment for 
school work. It stands in the center of the spacious new 
campus and commands a beautiful view of the surround- 
ing country. The building is 265 feet long, 65 feet wide, 
and three stories in height. The outside walls are made 
of light trick trimmed with limestone and terra cotta. 
Beautiful steps and approaches have been completed. It 
contains a fine auditorium, large library, study halls, 
society rooms, rooms for domestic science and domestic 
art, biological laboratories, chemical and physical labora- 
tories, science lecture rooms, music rooms, offices, lunch 
rooms and general recitation rooms. Although very large, 
the building has already been outgrown by the rapidly 
enlarging student body. A new wing, containing a spa- 
cious library, a modern cafeteria, additional class rooms 
and offices, was occupied two years ago. 

The woman's hall is of the same architecture and 
material as the main building. It is situated in the rear 
and at right angles to the main building, with a beautiful 
view in all directions over the hills. The hall has accom- 
modations for seventy-five persons, besides liberal pro- 
vision for parlors, dining room and suites for the matron. 
The woman's hall is in charge of a mature woman of 
experience and special training, so that the occupants 
will be as well cared for as they would be in their own 
home. 

A temporary wooden gymnasium has been constructed 
on the campus and is in constant use by the students 
of the Normal School, and otjher schools in this com- 
munity. It has one of the hest basketball floors in the 
State. The Monongahela Valley Basketball Tournament 
is held here annually, and is one of the important events 
of the athletic year. The gymnasium provides splendid 
opportunities for the training of students in all indoor 
games and sports. It is the laboratory of the department 
of physical education. 

The campus is rapidly becoming one of the most beau- 
tiful and picturesque grounds in the State. Several acres 
nave been laid out in gardens, trees and shrubbery are 
being planted, walks and roads laid, and other improve- 
ments made. 



Fairmont State Normal School 23 



The Legislature of 1925 appropriated money to pur- 
chase twenty-'six additional acres of land adjoining the 
present campus, to be used as an athletic field. This 
will be ready for use in 1928. 



TRAINING SCHOOLS 

Arrangements have 'been made with the Board of 
Education of Fairmont Independent District by which 
the Butcher (School, located on Fourth street, and the 
White (School, located on Locust Avenue, are open to the 
regular Normal (School Seniors for observation and prac- 
tice teaching. 

Arrangements have been made also for training facili- 
ties in the elementary schools at Jayenne and Barrackville 
and in the high schools at Barrackville, Fairmont and 
East Side, Fairmont. Students of the Normal School 
have abundant opportunity to observe excellent teaching 
and to do practice teaching, under competent critic teach- 
ers. All training work is under the direction of the 
Education Department of the Normal School. 



LIBRARY 



Fairmont Normal has a library of more than nine 
thousand volumes, in charge of a competent librarian and 
assistants. The new library room is one of the largest 
and most beautiful rooms of its kind in the State, and 
is fully furnished with modern library equipment. The 
books have been selected with care, with the special view 
of getting together the best books in the different fields 
of knowledge and literature and specifically in the field 
of Education. Virtually all the authoritative books on 
Education, all the classics in English and American Lit- 
erature, and all well-known reference books are to be 
found in the library. Modern fiction, drama and poetry 
are well represented. 

In the library are to be found more than one hundred 
of the most useful and popular newspapers and maga- 
zines, both educational and general. Students are allowed 
free access to these periodicals, and each week the librar- 
ian posts on the library bulletin lists of stories and ar- 
ticles most worth reading, so that the student may be 
assisted in finding what he wants to read. The library 
owns a large number of bound volumes of periodicals of 
recent years. 



24 Fairmont State Normal School 



EXPENSES 

It is the aim of the Normal School authorities to keep 
the expenses for students as low as is consistent with 
their being well provided for. Fairmnot is not an in- 
expensive place to live, hut the new woman's hall will 
allow of students being cared for at very reasonable cost. 
It is estimated that a year's schooling at Fairmont Nor- 
mal costs about as follows: 

Board and Room $300.00 

Tuition and Class Expense 25.00 

Laundry 30.00 

Books and Stationery 15.00 

Miscellaneous 30.00 

Total $400.00 

(Rooms at Morrow Hall range from $1.50 to $2.00 
a week. Table board is $5.00 a week.) 

This summary is estimated on the needs of the aver- 
age student. Some students will spend considerably more 
than this, and some will be able to attend school for 
slightly less. 

No one who desires to attend school at Fairmont Nor- 
mal slhould become discouraged because he is not provided 
with sufficient money to pay all his expenses. There is 
abundance of work of various kinds for young men and 
women in and about Fairmont, and any ambitious and 
energetic student can make his own way while attending 
school. A faculty committee assists students to secure 
employment. 

A good many young women students secure rooms 
for light housekeeping and reduce the cost of living ma- 
terially, especially if they can have some provisions sent 
them from home. 



ORGANIZATIONS AND STUDENT 
ACTIVITIES 

Student organizations and activities carried on by 
students have a distinct and notable place in the school. 
Recognizing that they encourage initiative and self-con- 
trol, provide laboratory training in English, teach par- 
liamentary law, and train in appearing before the pub- 
lic, and realizing that this is of special value for teach- 



Fairmont State Normal School 25 



ers, the authorities manifest keen interest in the conduct 
and success of the established organizations and the for- 
mation of new ones. Every student can find some kind 
of student work that fits in with his interest and talents. 



STUDENT BODY 

The entire school is organized into an association 
known as the Student Body which meets regularly once a 
month and also at the call of the president. It fills an 
important place in the general work of the Normal 
iSchopl. Through this organization, receptions are ar- 
ranged, officers of the "Columns" and "Pamphlet" elected, 
special committees appointed, the lecture course directed, 
and many other services as they arise from time to time 
rendered. A (Student Body fee of $2.50 a year is required, 
of all (Students. This covers the cost of receptions, flow- 
ers, and additional expenses for the student body. It also 
entitles the student to a ticket for all numbers in the 
regular lecture course. The constitution of the Student 
Body is printed in the Fairmont Normal Hand-Book. 



SOCIAL CABINET 

The president of the Student Body and the presidents 
of all the school organizations, together with a faculty 
representative, constitute what is known as the Social 
'Cabinet. This is the advisory board of the Student Body. 
Through it many wholesome movements are launched 
and projects initiated. 



CLASS ORGANIZATIONS 

At the beginning of the school year each academic 
class forms an organization by electing officers and ap- 
pointing committees. The classes give parties, engage in 
athletic contests, and act as units in all the activities of 
the school. A member of the faculty serves as class 
adviser to each class. 



26 Fairmont State Normal School 



WRITERS' CLUB 

Students who are interested in writing have an op- 
portunity to carry on literary work through the Writers' 
Club. This organization publishes The Columns, a fort- 
nightly news magazine, and The Pamphlet, a pictorial 
year-book. The Columns is a member of the West Vir- 
ginia Intercollegiate Press Association. Work on The 
Columns may be credited on English 46. 



THE MASQUERS 

The Masquers is the name of the student organization 
interested in dramatic work. It has always been a very 
popular club, efficiently utilizing and developing the 
dramatic talent of the college and Normal department. 
The auditorium is well equipped with a modern stage 
thus providing the club with an excellent "Little Theatre" 
where all its productions can be presented. It has been 
the policy of the club to stage a popular comedy early 
the first semester which can then be taken to outlying 
cities for additional performances. Following this, a pro- 
gram of one-act plays is given, then a rather difficult 
drama is presented as the big spring production. This 
past year the important plays were, "A Russian Honey- 
Moon" by Scribe; "Children of the Moon," 'by Flavin; 
"Love 'Em and Leave 'Em," by Abbot and. Weaver; and 
"The Enemy" by Pollock. To develop the talent of the 
club, a one-act play is presented at the business meetings 
eadh month. The club has also accumulated many acts of 
scenery, much stage furniture, and properties, useful in 
staging their productions. 



COLLEGIATE DRAMATIC SOCIETY 

The Alpha cast of the National Honorary Dramatic 
Fraternity, Alpha Psi Omega, founded in 1925, is located 
at this school. It is the aim of this fraternity to stimulate 
interest in dramatics and recognize and reward effort put 
forth in these lines. Any student who writes a play that 
is produced, displays a certain degree of ability in a 
number of plays, is rewarded by election to this honor 
fraternity. 



Fairmont State Normal School 27 



THE ORATORICAL SOCIETY 

Those who wish to develop ability as public speakers 
have abundant opportunity in the activiteis of the Oratori- 
cal Society. This club has varied programs of debating, 
oratory, and some of a purely literary and social nature. 
This club is a charter member of the West Virginia State 
Forensic Association, which is in turn a member of the 
National Intercollegiate Oratorical Association. The 
Fairmont Oratorical Society has always had a representa- 
tive in the state oratorical contest. Debates were held 
during the past year with West Virginia Wesleyan Col- 
lege, Glenville, West Liberty, and Davis-Elkins College. 

Every student, man or woman, is eligible to compete 
for the State prizes in oratory; $25.00 for the first, $10.00 
for the second prize. The winner is then the candidate 
for the interstate prize of $50.00 and the winner of this is 
in turn the candidate for the National prize of $250.00. 

The Bar Association of Fairmont will annually offer 
a generous prize of $1.00.00 or over to the winner of a 
local contest fostered among the men of the college. 



CHEMISTRY SOCIETY 

A chemistry society, the Lambda Delta Lambda, has 
just been organized. The purpose of this organization is 
to promote interest in the study of chemistry and physics. 
The membership is limited to young men who have had 
at least sixteen hours of chemistry. Mr. Rogers is honor- 
ary president. 



HISTORY HONOR SOCIETY 

This organization exists to encourage interest and a 
high quality of work in history and related studies and 
to aford a means of recognizing work of more than or- 
dinary quality in such subjects. To be eligible to mem- 
bership students must have gained sixteen hours credit 
in history with no grade below C and with an average of 
not less than B in all history courses. 



28 Fairmont State Normal School 



"T. B. L" FRATERNITY 

This fraternity is one of the late arrivals on the 
campus. Its purposes are to promote good fellowship, 
to encourage loyalty to the college, and to endeavor to 
make the college a larger and a (better college. It is 
especially interested in seing that the male enrollment 
increases. Its members are male students who are avowed 
boosters of the college, and who have accomplished some- 
thing of value to the institution in the way of scholar- 
ship, athletics, student government, or some other major 
line of collegiate endeavor. Beginning with the collegiate 
year 1927-1928, no one will be pledged to this fraternity 
who has credit for less than twelve hours of college 
work, earned either at this institution, or at some other 
institution of standard college grade. 



GLEE CLUBS 

Fairmont iState Normal has two Glee Clubs: one for 
the young men and one for the young women. These 
are voluntary organizations. All students having musical 
ability belong to one or the other of these organizations, 
and meet once a week throughout the year for practice 
and rehearsals. At times during the year the two or- 
ganizations combine to give a joint public program. The 
instructor of vocal music in the Normal School is director 
of these clubs. Credit for glee club work may be secured 
as Music 3. 



CHRISTIAN ASSOCIATIONS 

Fairmont Normal has active chapters of both the 
Young Men's Christian Association and the Youner Wom- 
en's Christian Association. The latter is especially large 
and influential. These organizations have monthly pro- 
gram meetings and carry on throughout the year a 
number of charitable and religious activities. The Young 
Men's Christian Association publishes the student hand- 
book. Representatives of the Association are sent each 
year to the national meetings. 



Fairmont State Normal School 29 



WOMEN'S SOCIAL CLUBS 

The young women living in Morrow Hall have formed 
a "house" organization, with officers and* committees, to 
carry on the social affairs of the Hall. The young women 
students living in Fairmont have an organization known 
as the ^0. I. T." (Out in Town) club, which attempts to 
secure co-operation and consolidation among these stu- 
dents. 



LECTURE COURSE 

The aim of the lecture course is to keep the men and 
women who attend Fairmont Normal in touch with the 
various activities of the world, that enter vitally into 
human progress. This is done by bringing outstanding 
musicians, artists in other lines, travelers, lecturers, ex- 
plorers, and entertainers to the school. The course is 
supported by a fee at the time of enrollment and public 
patronage. 

One of the notable numbers for 1927-28 is the lecture 
by Lorado Taft, Who will come in February, 1928. Others 
who may be on the program are: Mary Lewis and Cecil 
Arden, famous grand opera artists; Dr. Lowell Thomas, 
scholar, lecturer, and historian, with Allenby in Palestine 
and Arabia; and Rabbi Stephen S. Wise, one of the most 
brilliant men of the Jewish race. 



OUTING CLUB 

The young women of the college have organized an 
Outing Club, which not only takes the place of the 
Hikers' Club of former years, but also broadens the scope 
of the physical activities in which the interest of its 
members is encouraged. Swimming, camping, tennis, 
stunts and dancing are among the popular additions. The 
purpose of the club is "to foster physical efficiency, good- 
fellowship and love of the out-of-doors." Any girl stu- 
dent of the school may join this club. It is a self-govern- 
ing organization with Miss Hammond as faculty adviser. 



30 Fairmont State Normal School 



ATHLETICS 

Fairmont Normal engages in the three major branches 
of organized interscholastic athletics; football, basketball, 
and baseball. It is the policy of the institution to pro- 
vide equipment and apparatus and to encourage athletic 
sports within moderation. No effort has been made or 
will be made to bring the athletic activities to a higher 
level than that attained by other activities of the school. 
Coaches and physical directors are employed, a well bal- 
anced schedule is made each season, and the students 
support the teams loyally and enthusiastically; that is 
all that can reasonably be expected. 

As an illustration of the nature of the athletic ac- 
tivities of Fairmont, the schedules for 1927 are given: 



Football, 1927 

Sept. 30 — Salem College, abroad. 
Oct. 8 — Potomac iState, abroad. 
Oct. 14. — St. Francis College, home. 
Oct. 22 — Davis-Elkins College, home. 
Oct. 29 — Broaddus College, abroad. 
Nov. 5 — West Liberty Normal, home. 
Nov. 12— Marshall College, abroad. 
Nov. 19 — Glenville Normal, home. 



Baseball, 1927 

West Virginia University 5 — Fairmont 3 

West Virginia Unversity 5 — Fairmont 1 

Glenville Normal 2 — Fairmont 5 

Glenville Normal 4 — Fairmont 5 

Ida May — Fairmont 6 

Marshall College 15— Fairmont 3 

East Side Indies — 
Mannington Independents — 
Ida May Independents — 
West Liberty Normal — 
Moose Club, Fairmont — 
West Liberty Normal — 
Grafton B. & O. Limited— 
Glenville Normal — 
Glenville Normal — 
Broaddus College — 
Hundred Independents — 



Fairmont State Normal School 31 
Basketball, 1926-27 

Home Games Our Score Opponent 

Potomac State 29 20 

Marshall College 37 27 

Glenville Normal , 33 21 

West Virginia Wesleyan 26 27 

Broaddus College 29 54 

Bethany College 26 31 

West Liberty Normal 54 25 

Davis Elkins College 30 37 

Salem College 35 51 

Games Abroad — 

West Liberty Normal 36 25 

Bethany College 32 37 

Davis Elkins College 3Q 45 

Salem College 30 33 

Morris Harvey College '. 25 26 

Marshall College 37 29 

Broaddus College 35 27 

Glenville Normal 22 30 

West Virginia Wesleyan 19 26 



32 Fair mont State Normal School 

INFORMATION ABOUT CREDITS, 
CERTIFICATES, ETC.* 



The West Virginia Board of Education has passed 
certain regulations concerning credits, certificates, etc., 
some of which regulations are printed below. They apply 
to Fairmont Normal: 

I. — No advance credit for work of high school grade: 

Under no circumstances will credit of collegiate grade 
be allowed in normal schools, colleges, or the University 
for work done in a high school. 

II. — No college credit for work done in Class C and Class 
D summer schools: 

The work of such summer schools is intended for 
purely high school purposes, and to meet under limita- 
tions the requirements for certificates. The higher in- 
stitutions cannot accept such credits as college work. 

III. — Uniform entrance requirements of fifteen (15) ap- 
proved units: 

All state educational institutions will admit students 
to collegiate courses upon fifteen (15) approved units 
submitted by first class four-year high schools or other 
secondary schools of the same rank and standing. 

I5Vj — No professional credit for a teacher's certificate 
until high school course is completed: 

'Students must complete a first class high school 
course before taking up special work to meet certificate 
reqirements. High school students going to summer 
schools should take regular high school subjects until the 
high school course is completed. Under this plan some 
strong students may complete the high school units in 
time to take advantage of the spring and summer term 
of a teacher-training institution for the 18 weeks required 
for a first grade temporary certificate. 



* Note : These -were the regulations in effect at the time this 
catalog was printed. They may be altered before the school year 
of 1927-J28 begins, but so far as is possible, Fairmont Normal will 
observe them. 



Fairmont State Normal School 33 



V. — Professional work limited: 

The maximum amount of professional work to be 
taken in state teacher-training institutions shall be as 
follows: 

For college courses 30 semester tours 

for standard normal course 20 semester hours 

For short course 10 semester hours 

VI. — No credit for teaching experience: 

Beginning with the school year 1926-27 no school 
credit will be given for experience in teaching. 

VII. — Credit on a teacher's certificate: 

1. On an elementary certificate earned in the Uni- 
form Examination, one-half unit of high school credit 
may be allowed on each of the following subjects in which 
the applicant has received a grade of 85 per cent or more; 
Reading, English Grammar, Arithmetic, Physiology, 
United iStates History, Geography, Agriculture, Civil 
Government, Theory and Art of Teaching, State History, 
Bookkeeping, Ancient History. 

2. Credit for a subject on a teacher's certificate can- 
not be allowed if the student has already received credit 
for identical or similar work. 

3. Credit given on Reading and English Grammar on 
account of a teachers' certificate can be substituted only 
for first year high school English. 

VIII. — Credit on Reading Circle Books: 

1. A person who has made a grade of 85 per cent on 
any approved subjects of the Reading Circle Course by 
state examination may receive credit as follows: 

On a high school course, one-fourth unit in each sub- 
ject. 

IX. — Extension Classes: 

1. In Extension Classes conducted by members of the 
faculty of the institution, the conditions and standards of 
work should be as far as possible, the same as required 
in resident classes. 

2. A (State Institution may recognize extension class- 
es taught by persons not on the regular faculty under 
the following general conditions: 



34 Fairmont State Normal School 



(a) The instructor roust hold the degree of Master 
of Arts or have equivalent training in the subjects taught. 

(b) He must be approved by the head of the insti- 
tution's department in which the work is to be credited. 

(c) A person regularly engaged in school work may 
conduct not more than one two-hour course a semester. 

(d) The student must be on the same scholastic level 
as are students doing similar work in the institution. 

3. Credit for work in extension classes shall be given 
on the general basis of 18 recitation hours for one semes- 
ter hour of credit. 

X. — 'Correspondence work: 

1. Credit for correspondence courses shall be given 
on the general basis of 54 hours of study for 1 semester 
hour of credit, and the final examination shall be given 
by the person designated by the institution offering the 
course. 

2. The total amount of correspondence work that 
may be accredited on any course shall be as follows: 

(a) The standard colege course, 20 hours. 

(b) The standard normal course, 12 hours. 

(c) iShort normal course, 8 hours. 

XI. — Credit for Extension work limited: 

1. The total amount of extension work (including 
correspondence work) that may be done during one term 
of teaching shall not be more than 8 hours, not more than 
6 of which may be in corespondence work. This limita- 
tion is placed also upon residence work done at the Nor- 
mal School in evening and Saturday classes. 

XII. — Temporary and equivalent certificates: 

1. Beginning with 1927 the requirements for tem- 
porary (one year) certificates shall be: 

For first grade temporary: High school graduation 
and 24 semester hours of collegiate work, eight of which 
must be in professional subjects. 

For second grade temporary: High school graduation 
and 16 semester hours of collegiate work, eight of which 
must be in professional subjects. 



Fairmont State Normal School 35 



XIII. — Requirements for Renewal of First and Second 
Grade Temporary Certificates: 

1. iNine weeks in summer school — minimum credit 
eight semester hours; or (2) Six weeks in summer school 
and two or more hours credit earned by extension or 
correspondence since September 1, 1926. 

The eigjht hours of work required to renew a tem- 
porary certificate may be elected from any subjects, aca- 
demic or professional, which are required or may be elect- 
ed for credit on the Short or Standard Normal Courses. 
The work that should he done by a student in any year 
will depend uipon the work the applicant had in high 
school and previous summer terms. 

Note — Applicants for renewal of temporary certifi- 
cates must secure the recommendation of their county 
superintendents on Application Form 5, and file with 
registrar of summer school at the beginning of summer 
term. 

XIV. — Equivalent Certificates : 

1. The short normal equivalent certificate may be 
issued to any one Who obtains credit for the first year of 
the standard normal course as outlined in the catalogue. 

2. Any person who has completed the work required 
for, or equivalent to that of any course on which is 
issued a teacher's certificate, but who has not met the 
residence or other graduation requirements for a diploma 
may have his work approved by the State Board of Edu- 
cation and the corresponding certificate may be issued 
without formal graduation. The school work of such 
person will be approved only when the applicant meets 
the following conditions: 

(a) The applicant must make application on the form 
approved by the State Department of Education, giving 
a definite statement of the information requested. (Apply 
for Teacher-Training Form 14.) 

(b) All school work done must be evaluated and 
approved by the faculty or accrediting committee of a 
West Virginia School or College authorized to give the 
course for which such work is being approved. 

(c) The applicant must be recommended by the city 
or district and county superintendent under whom he has 
had his most recent teaching experience. 



36 Fairmont State Normal School 



XV. — Requirements for renewal of first class certificates: 

(d) After July 1, 1927 standard normal equivalent 
certificates will be issued only to teachers of ten or more 
years experience. The youngr teachers must meet the 
residence requirements of some approved teacher-training 
institution. 

All certificates issued for a period of five years (ele- 
mentary, special, supervisors and high school) may be 
renewed ON EXPIRATION if the applicant has taught 
three full terms during the life of the certificate and the 
renewal is recommended by the county superintndnt. 
After 1926 the applicant for both first and second renewal 
of such certificates must earn SIX SEMESTER HOURS in 
an accredited school (iby residence or correspondence, or 
pass an examination on two of the state reading circle 
subjects with a grade of 85%. 



Fairmont State Normal School 37 



COURSES OF STUDY 



Fairmont iStiate Normal .School is a teacher's college. 
A full four-year college course, leading to the degree of 
Bachelor of Arts in Education, and a two-year course, 
leading to a diploma, are offered. 



COLLEGE COURSE 

PURPOSE: This course is designed to prepare teach- 
ers for Elementary Schools, Junior and Senior High 
Schools, and' for administration positions. 

ENTRANCE: "The present requirements for gradua- 
tion as fixed by the West Virginia High School course 
of study will be recognized for college entrance to West 
Virginia Normal Schools and Colleges." But "Students 
will be admitted to the State Normal Schools and Colleges 
on presentation of 15 units of high school credit, the re- 
maining unit to be made up during the first or second 
year of Normal School or College work." 

LENGTH: The course consists of four full years of 
work above a four-year high school course. One hundred 
twenty-eight semester hours are required for graduation. 

RESIDENCE: Thirty-two hours must be done in resi- 
dence at the Normal School, sixteen hours of which must 
be done during the senior year. 

RATE AT WHICH CREDIT MAY BE EARNED: The 

regular amount of work each year of this course is 32 
semester hours. In the first two years of the course 
the student may, by permission of his class adviser, carry 
36 semester hours a year. In the last two years of the 
course the student may by permission of his class adviser 
carry 34 semester hours a year. Only superior students 
are (given permission to carry more than 32 hours. 

ADVANCED CREDIT: "Work done in any state 
normal school, college, or university of the state, shall be 
credited, hour for hour, by any other Normal School, 
College or University of the State, subject to residence 
graduation, and special requirements on account of mem- 



Fairmont State Normal School 



bership in any approved association of colleges or univer- 
sities." Students and graduates in the Normal Courses, 
either in this institution or elsewhere, will receive credit 
hour for hour for work done in these courses. Thus, a 
graduate of the Standard Normal course, who has earned 
64 semester 'hours, would receive credit for 64 hours on 
the College course. He would thus have 64 additional 
hours to do to complete the College course, but it is pos- 
sible that he may 'have to do more than that to comply 
with the graduation requirements. 

CERTIFICATE, GRANTED: Graduates of the^college 
courses receive a certificate from the State of West Vir- 
ginia, which certificate enables them to act as principal 
or supervisor or to teach in any high school or elementary 
school in the state and which is accepted by other states 
as the equivalent of the high school certificate in those 
states. 

RECOGNITION OF COURSE: Fairmont Normal has 
"Class A" standing in the American Association of Teach- 
ers Colleges and in the Southern Association of Teacher- 
Training Institutions. Graduates of the College course 
have already been given unconditional entrance to the 
graduate schools of such institutions as the George 
Peabody College for Teachers. 



STANDARD NORMAL COURSE 

PURPOSE: This course is designed to prepare teach- 
ers for positions in the elementary schools of the towns 
and cities of West Virginia. Graduates of this course 
are recommended 1 for positions in the elementary schools 
of the state. 

ENTRANCE: The same requirements as for those 
entering the college course. (iSee page 37.) 

LENGTH: This course represents two full years of 
work above a four-year high school course; 64 semester 
'hours are required for graduation. 

RESIDENCE: 32 hours of the 64 hours must be done 
in Fairmont Normal. At least 24 of the 32 hours must 



Fairmont State Normal School 39 



be done in residence; the remaining 8 hours may be done 
through correspondence or extension work from Fairmont 
Normal. 

RATE AT WHICH CREDIT MAY BE EARNED: 

The regular amount of work for each year of this course 
is 32 semester hours. Exceptional students may be given 
permission by their class advisers to carry a maximum 
of 36 semester hours. 

ADVANCE 'CREDIT: Credit in the Normal Course 
is allowed, hour for hour, for work done in any institution 
of recognized standing beyond high school rank. (No 
advanced credit may be allowed for any work done in high 
school, whether before or after high school graduation.) 

CERTIFICATE GRANTED: Graduates of this course 
receive a certificate from the State of West Virginia, 
good for five years, and renewable almost indefinitely, 
so that it is practically a certificate for life. This enables 
the graduates to teach in any school in West Virginia, 
and it is usually accepted by other states as equivalent 
to the highest elementary certificates in those states. 

SALARY: Graduates of the Standard Normal Course 
cannot receive, under the law of West Virginia, a salary 
of less than $100.00 a month. This is the basic salary for 
the first term of teaching. Most graduates of Fairmont 
Normal start in with a salary of from $110.00 to $140.00 
a month. 



THE "SHORT COURSE" CERTIFICATE 

Fairmont Normal offered for some years a one-year 
course, called the "Short Course". This has now been 
discontinued. But the school continues to grant the so- 
called "iShort Course Equivalent" certificate to all those 
who finish the first year of the Standard Course and who 
find it necessary or desirable to teach for a time before 
completing the Standard Course. This certificate enables 
its holder to teach in any elementary school of the state, 
at a salary of not less than $90.00 a month. 



40 Fairmont State Normal School 



CONTENTS OF THE COLLEGE COURSE 



The College Course is not organized arid outlined by 
the semester-schedule plan, but by major subjects, minors, 
groups, and electives. Courses are to be taken, whenever 
possible, in the order of thir numerical designation; cer- 
tain courses may be taken only in the junior and senior 
years; certain other courses may not be entered upon 
until certain pre-requisite courses have been finished. 

Three curricula are offered: one for prospective prin- 
cipals and superintendents, designated Curriculum A; 
one for high school teachers, Curriculum B; and one for 
elementary school teachers, Curriculum C. 

Curriculum A is open only to men and women of 
maturity and successful experience, or to students of 
superior ability who give promise of developing into effi- 
cient school administrators. Students electing this cur- 
riculum must major in education and do not less than 
30 hours in this subject, and must have two minors of 
16 hours each. No one is permitted to enroll for this 
curriculum without the permission of the senior class 
adviser and the committee of classification and grades. 

Curriculum B is open to all students desiring to pre- 
pare for high school training. Students pursuing this 
curriculum must major in the subject that they plan to 
teach in the high school and minor in a related subject 
or in the second subject that they plan to teach. Educa- 
tion cannot be selected as a major or minor nor to meet 
any other group requirement. 

Curriculum C is open to all students desiring to pre- 
pare for teaching in any elementary grade. 

To graduate from the College in any curriculum a 
student must see that his work conforms to the following 
requirements : 

1. A total of 128 semester hours. 

2. In Education, 24 hours. 

3. In English, 7 hours. 

4. In Physical Education, 4 hours. 



Fairmont State Normal School 41 



OUTLINE OF CURRICULUM A* 



Major: Education 30 Hrs. 

Education 2 4 Hrs. Education 22 4 Hrs. 

Educa. 3 or 20 4 Hrs. Education 23 4 Hrs. 

Education 6 4 Hrs. Education 24 2 Hrs. 

Education 21 4 Hers. Education 26 4 Hrs. 

English 7 Hrs. 

English 1 or 7....2% Hrs. English 41 2 Hrs. 

English 2 or 8....2V 2 Hrs. 

Physical Education 4 Hrs. 

Phys. Ed. 1 2 Hrs. Phys. Ed. Elec 2 Hrs. 

First Minor 16 Hrs. 

Second Minor 16 Hrs. 

Distributed Elec.: Four Groups of 8 Hrs. Each 32 Hrs. 

Group 1 8 Hrs. Group 3 8 Hrs. 

Group 2 8 Hrs. Group 4 8 Hrs. 

Free Electives 23 Hrs. 

The minors are to be selected on the advice and with 
the approval of the class adviser. They should be the sub- 
jects the student would prefer to teach if he should be 
called upon to do so. 

At least 20 hours of the 32 hours offered as the minor 
subjects and at least 45 of the 128 hours required for 
graduation must be earned in courses scheduled for the 
junior and senior college years (courses numbered from 
"20" upward). 



OUTLINE OF CURRICULUM B 

Education 24 Hrs. 

Education 20 4 Hrs. Education 24 2 Hrs. 

Education 21 4 Hrs. Elective 10 Hrs. 

Education 22 4 Hrs. 

English v . 7 Hrs. 

English 1 or 7..2y 2 Hrs English 41 2 Hrs. 

English 2 or 8..2% Hrs. 



* Committees from the teacher-training institutions of West 
Virginia are preparing new curriculums for the normal school and 
teachers colleges. So far as is possible, the new curriculum will be 
offered for 1927-28. 



42 Fairmont State Normal School 

Physical Education 4 Hrs. 

Phys. Edu. 1 2 Hrs. Elective 2 Hrs. 

Major ..24 Hrs. 

Minor 16 Hrs. 

Dist. Elec., Four Groups of 8 Hrs. Each 32 Hrs. 

Group 1 8 Hrs. Group 3 8 Hrs. 

Group 2 8 Hrs. Group 4 8 Hrs. 

Free Electives 21 Hrs. 

The major and minor subjects shall be chosen not 
later than the beginning of the sophomore year. The 
student should select as his major the subject that he 
desires to teach. The minor should be chosen from a 
related field, or should be the second subject that the 
student would elect to teach, if he should be called upon 
to teach two subjects. 

At least 12 bours of the 24 hours offered as the major 
and at least 45 of the 128 hours required for graduation 
must be earned in courses scheduled for the junior and 
senior years (courses numbered from "20" upward). 

In 1927-28 the majors and minors may be chosen 
from the following departments or groups: 

1. Education (In Curriculum "A" only). 

2. Biology. 

.3 Chemistry. 

4. English. 

.5 Fine Arts (drawing and music). 

6. Geography. 

7. History. 

8. Home Economics. 

9. Mathematics. 
10. Sociology. 

Minors may be chosen from any of the major sub- 
jects except education and also from: 

1. Economics. 

2. French. 

3. Latin. 

4. Physical Education (12 hours in addition to the 
required courses). 

The groups which may be offered are the majors and 
minors (except Education) and also: 

1. Physics. 

2. Political Science. 

3. Psychology. 



Fairmont State Normal School 43 

The teaching combinations approved by the State 
Supervisor of High (Schools and by the Secondary School 
Principals Associations are as follows: Whether enrolled 
for Curriculum "A" or "B," students should prepare for 
teaching two subjects in any of these combinations. 

1. English and one of the following: 1 Social 
Studies; 2. Fine Arts; 3. French; 4. Latin. 

2. Social Studies and one of the following: 1. Eng- 
lish; 2. Fine Arts. 

3. Science. 

4. Mathematics: 1. Science. 

5. Home Economics and one of the following: 1. 
Science; 2. Fine Arts. 

6. Agriculture: 1. Science. 

7. Commerce. 

8. Physical Education. 

9. Practical Arts for (boys. 



OUTLINE OF CURRICULUM C* 

General Requirements: 

Education 24 Hrs. 

Physical Education 8 Hrs. 

Mathematics 4 Hrs. 

Psychology 4 Hrs. 40 Hrs. 

Major — Social Science 30 Hrs. 

Minor — English 20 Hrs. 

Four Groups, Eight Hours Each 32 Hrs. 

1. Biology. 

2. Physical Science. 

3. Fine Arts. 

4. Elective. 

Free Electives 6 Hrs. 



Total 128 Hrs. 

First two years to be identical with the standard two- 
year curricula. 

Students lacking in capacity for the fine arts may, by 
permission of the class adviser, substitute some other 
group for Fine Arts. 

At least 45 hours must be in courses numbered 20 or 
higher. 

* This curriculum is being offered for the first time this year, 
1927-28. The requirements of specific courses in the academic sub- 
jects have not yet been fixed. 



44 



Fairmont State Normal School 



Name. 



COLLEGE CURRICULUM A 



Address. 



Education 








Hrs. 
,30 


Education 2 


4 


Education 22 


4 






Education 3 or 20 


4 


| Education 23 


4 




Education 6 


4 


| Education 24 


4 


1 


Education 21 


4 


1 Education 26 


4 


1 
1 



English 








7 


English 1 or 7 


2% 


1 

j English 41 


2 


| 


English 2 or 8 


|2y 2 


1 


1 


1 



Physical Education 
Phys. Ed. 1 



I Phys. Ed. Elec. 



1st Minor 16 



2nd Minor _ _ 16 



Distributed Electives : 

1 


Four 1 


Gro 


ups... 

1 
i 


"3 | "1 


32 


2 




! • 1! 





Free Electives _ 17 



Total 128 



Fairmont State Normal School 



45 



COLLEGE CURRICULUM B 



Name 



Address. 





















Hrs. 
24 


Education 20 
Education 21 
Education 22 


4 
4 

4 




Education 24 
Electives in Ed. 


2 
10 






English _ _ 

English 1 or 7 
English 2 or 8 


2% 

2y 2 




English 41 


2 


7 

1 
1 








4 


Phys. Ed. 1 


2 




Phys. Ed. Elec. 


2 




Major 






*•- — 

1 


24 

1 


Minor _ 






16 



Distributed Electives: Four Groups 
1 



32 



Free Electives 



17 



Total. 



.128 



46 



Fairmont State Normal School 



COLLEGE CURRICULUM C 



Name _ „... Address — - 

Hr¥. 



Education _ * 












24 


Education 2 


4 




Education 8 


2 






Education 3 
Education 6 , 


5 
4 




Education 9 
Education 25 


6 
4 







Physical Education _ - 8 



Mathematics _ ~ 4 



Psychology 20 _ 4 



Major : Social Science 



30 



Minor : English _ 20 



Four 










32 


1. 


Biology 






Isl 




2. 


Physical Science 








8 






3. 


Fine Arts 








8 






4. 


Elective 








8 







Free Electives 6 



Total _ 128 



Fairmont State Normal School 47 

CONTENTS OF 
THE STANDARD NORMAL COURSE* 



Students entering the Standard Normal course have 
a choice of one of three differentiated curricula: primary, 
intermediate, and junior high. The differentiation does 
not begin, however, until the second semester of the junior 
year, in order that students may have an opportunity, 
during the first semester, of deciding what work they 
wish to take. Certain subjects (called "constants," and 
marked with a star) are found in all the Standard Normal 
courses. The electives are chosen from the list of subjects 
outlined in this catalog, but must be approved by the 
class adviser. 

The requirements in Mathematics 1 will be waived 
upon satisfactory entrance examination. These examina- 
tions will be held a day or two after the opening of 
each term. 

Students and graduates of the Standard Normal course 
are given credit, hour for hour, on the College course. 
But inasmuch as the Normal and the College courses are 
somewhat widely differentiated, this does not mean that 
graduates of the Normal course with 64 hours of credit 
can necessarily complete the College course by doing 64 
additional hours of work, making a total of 128 hours. 
The graduation requirements of the college course, as 
stated in pages 37 and 38, must be met. Moreover, the 
following regulations must be observed: 

1. Not more than 30 hours in Education may be 
credited in the College course. 

2. Work taken in the second year of the Normal 
course may be counted on the major and minor subjects. 
Work taken in the first year may be counted on the group 
and free hours. 

Primary Curriculum 

Junior Year 

♦Education 2. Educational Psychology 4 hours 

♦Physical Education 1. Health 2 

♦Sociology 1. iSbcial Relations 1 

♦English 1 or 7 2y 2 

♦English 2 or 8 2 Ms 



See note on page 41. 



48 Fairmont St ate Normal School 

Education 3. Prin. of Learning & Teaching 5 

Physical Education 3. Teachers' Physical Educa. 2 

Art 5. Drawing Methods 2 

Electives 11 

Total 32 

Senior Year 

♦Education 6. School Management and School 

Hygiene 4 hours 

♦Education 8. Tests and Measurements 2 

♦Education 9. Observation and Teaching 5 

English 4. Children's Literature 2 

Music 2. Music Methods 2 

Biology 1 or 2. Nature Study 2 

English 3. (Story Telling 2 

Electives 13 

Total 32 

Intermediate Curriculum 

Junior Year 

♦Education 2. Educational Psychology 4 hours 

♦Physical Education 1. Health 2 

♦Sociology 1. iSocial Relations 1 

♦English 1 or 7 2% 

♦English 2 or 8 2% 

Mathematics 1 3 

Education 3. Prin. of Learning & Teaching 5 

Art 5. Drawing Methods 2 

Physical Education 4. Teachers' Physical Educa. 2 

Electives 9 

Total 32 

Senior Year 

♦Education 6. iSchool Management and School 

Hygiene 4 hours 

♦Education 8. Tests and Measurements 2 

♦Education 9. Observation and Teaching 5 

English 4. Children's Literature 2 

Music 2. Music Methods 2 

Physical Education 5 2 

Biology 1 or 2. Nature Study 2 

Electives 13 

Total 32 



Fairmont State Normal School 49 



JUNIOR HIGH SCHOOL CURRICULUM 



Junior Year 

♦Education 2. Educational Psychology 4 hours 

Education 7. Junior High School 5 

♦Physical Education 1. Health 2 

♦Sociology 1. Social Relations 1 

♦English 1 or 7 2% 

♦English 2 or 8 2Y 2 

Mathematics 1 3 

Physical Education 4. Teachers' Physical Educa. 2 
fElectives 11 

Total 32 

Senior Year 

♦Education 6. School Management and School 

Hygiene 4 hours 

♦Education 8. Tests and Measurements 2 

♦Education 9. Observation and Teaching 5 

English 6. Juvenile Literature 2 

Physical Education 5 2 

fElectives 17 

Total 32 



t The electives are to be selected, with the approval of the class 
adviser, from the subjects which the student expects to teach in 
the junior high school. 



50 Fairmont State Normal School 



DESCRIPTIVE OUTLINE OF COURSES 



Unless otherwise stated, the credit value of the course 
is identical with the number of hours per week that the 
class meets. 

Courses from one to nineteen are considered to be 
Junior and Senior Normal level or Freshman and Sopho- 
more College level. Courses from twenty on are consid- 
ered to be Junior and Senior College level. 

The following outline does not attempt to list the 
spring and summer school courses, except in those in- 
stances where "Sp" or "iS" is placed after the numerical 
designation of the course. The spring and summer school 
courses are all, with infrequent exceptions, chosen from 
the regular courses. 

"A" indicates a course offered in the first semester, 
"B" a course offered in the second semester. The abbre- 
viations "M", "T", "W", "Th", "F", indicate the days 
on which the class meets. The figures "8:15", "9:10", etc., 
indicate the hours at which the class 'begins. The schedule 
therefore, is definitely made for 1927-28, and will not be 
changed except for very strong reasons. 



EDUCATION 

Mr. Shreve, Miss Gibson, Miss Hull, Mr. Hyde, 
Miss Leonard, Mrs. Richmond, Mr. White 

Education 2A — Elementary Educational Psychology. 

Four hours, first semester. First section, 9:10, T. W, 
Th, and F; second section, 10:05, M, T, W, and F; 
third section, 11:00, M, T, Th, and F; fourth section, 
2:00, M, T, W, and Th. Required in all the normal 
curricula. In this course a study is made of the 
fundamental principles underlying learning and 
and teaching. Some attention is given to the native 
equipment of the pupil, individual differences, intelli- 
gence, and to grading and the distribution of marks. 
— Mr. Shreve and Mr. Hyde. 

Education 2B — Elementary Educational Psychology. 

Four hours, second semester. First section, 9:10, T, 
W, Th, and F; second section, 10:05, M, T, W, and F; 
fourth section 1:00, M, T, W, and F. A repetition 
of Education 2A. — Mr. Shreve and Mr. Hyde. 



Fairmont State Normal School 51 



Education 3A — The Principles of Learning and Teaching. 

Fivejiours, first semester, 8:15, M, T, W, Th, and F. 
There are three sections of this course: two for 
primary teachers and one for intermediate teachers. 
The course is organized around the chief types of 
classroom activities: drill, assimilative thinking, 
problem-solving, and appreciation. Each type is con- 
sidered from two points of view: (1) the factors of 
study; and (2) how to direct the pupils' learning 
activities. The 'general principles thus derived are 
applied to several of the elementary subjects. Pre- 
requisite, Education 2. — Miss Gibson, Miss Leonard 
and Mrs. Richmond. 

Education 3B — The Principles of Teaching and Learning. 

Five hours, second semester, 8:15, M, T, W, Th, and 
F. Three sections. A repetition of 3A. — Miss Gibson, 
Miss Leonard, and Mrs. Richmond. 

Education 6A — School Management. 

Four hours, first semester. First section, 9:10, M, T, 
W, and F; second section, 10:05, M, T, W, and F. 
Required in all the normal curricula. This course 
deals primarily with the problems of classroom man- 
agement, but some attention is given to the more 
•general problems of administration and supervision. 
The main topics considered are: the meaning and aim 
of education, membership and attendance, school or- 
ganization, discipline, grading, classifying, promot- 
ing, daily programs, school hygiene. Open to normal 
seniors and college sophomores. Prerequisite, Edu- 
cation 2. — Mr. White. 

Education 6B — School Management. 

Four hours, second semester. First section. 9:10, M, 
T, W, and F; second section. 10:05, M, T, W, and F; 
third section, 2:50, M, T. W. and Th. A repetition 
of 6A.— Mr. White and Mr. Hyde. 

Education 7A — Principles and Methods of the Junior High 
School. 

Five hours, first semester, 8:15, M, T, W, Th, and F. 
Required in the junior high school curriculum. This 
course deals with the junior high school. Both the 
principles and methods are considered. The main 
topics are: the aims of the junior high school, the 



52 Fairmont State Normal School 



organization, the program of studies, and methods 
of teaching high school subjects. Each student makes 
a special study of the subjects that he is planning to 
teach in the junior high school. Prerequisite, Edu- 
cation 2. — Miss Hull. 

Education 7B — Principles and Methods of the Junior High 
School. 

Five hours, second semester, 8:15, M, T, W, Th, and 
F. A repetition of 7A.— Miss Hull. 

Education 8A — Educational Measurements in the Ele- 
mentary School. 

Two hours, first semester. First section, 1:00, T, 
and Th; second section, 1:55, T. and Th. Required in 
all the normal curricula. The aims of this course 
are: (1) to develop a scientific attitude towards the 
problems of measuring the results of teaching; (2) to 
develop the ability to administer the standard tests; 
and (3) to develop the ability to interpret the results 
of tests and to express these results in concise form. 
Some attention will be given to the application of 
remedial measures to overcome the defects revealed 
by tests. Prerequisites, Education 2, and senior nor- 
mal standing. — Mr. White. 

Education 8B — Educational Measurements in the Elemen- 
tary School. 

Two hours, second semester. First section, 1:00, T, 
and Th; second section, 1:55, T, and Th. A repetition 
of 8A.— Mr. White. 

Education 9A — Observation and Teaching. 

Five hours, first semester. Hours to be arranged. (A 
double period is required). Open to seniors only. 
Required in all the normal curricula. This course 
consists of observation and practice teaching under 
the supervision of a training teacher. A minimum 
of 90 clock hours of observation and teaching is 
required of each student. At least 60 hours of actual 
teaching must be done. Prerequisites; Education 2, 
3, and 6. — Miss Gibson, Miss Hull, Miss Leonard, and 
Mrs. Richmond. 



Fairmont State Normal School 53 



Education 9B — 'Observation and Teaching. 

Five 'hours, second semester. Hours to be arranged. 
This course is the same as 9A. One-half the seniors 
will enroll for 9A the first semester and the other 
half for 9B the second semester. 

Education 20 — Methods of Teaching in Secondary Schools. 

Four hours, first semester, 8:15, T. W. Th, and F. 
Required in college curricula A and B in the junior or 
senior year. The aim of this course is to prepare the 
student for effective teaching in the secondary school. 
The point of view is that of directing the learning 
activities of the pupils. A minimum of one hour a 
week of observation is required in this course. Pre- 
requisite, Education 2. — Mr. Hyde. 

Education 21 — Advanced Educational Psychology. 

Four hours, second semester, 8:15, T. W. Th, and F. 
Required of all college students in the junior or 
senior year. This course is organized around a num- 
ber of problems. Each student investigates the prob- 
lems assigned and reports his findings to the class 
for discussion and evaluation. Prerequisite, Educa- 
tion 2. — Mr. Shreve. 

Education 22 — Principles of Secondary Education. 

Four hours, first semester, 1:00, M, T, W, and Th. 
Required of all college students in the junior or 
senior year. The following topics are considered: 
the objectives of secondary education, supervised 
study and individualized instruction, use of intelli- 
gence tests and educational measurements, health 
work, the content of secondary school subjects, and 
the organization and administration of the high 
school. — Mr. Shreve. 

Education 23 — School Administration and Supervision. 

Four hours, second semester, 11:00, M. T. Th, and F. 
This course is designed to meet the needs of those 
preparing for administrative and supervisory posi- 
tions. The first 'half of the course deals with the 
problems of school administration and the second 
half with the supervision of instruction. Prerequisite, 
Education 6.— Mr. White. 



54 Fairmont State Normal School 



Education 24 — Observation and Directed Teaching. 

Five hours, first or second semester for nine weeks, 
two hours' credit. Hours to be arranged. Required 
of all college seniors. The student will observe and 
teach in the high school under the direction of the 
department of education or the major professor. — 
Mr. Shreve, Mr. Hyde, Miss Hull, and Major Pro- 
fessor. 

Education 25 — The Psychology of the Elementary School 
Subjects. 

Four hours, second semester, required in the junior 
or senior year in college curriculum C. A review 
and interpretation of the scientific studies in the 
psychology of the elementary school subjects. Pre- 
requisite, Education 2 or Psychology 1. Offered in 
1927-28, if there is sufficient demand for this course. 
— Mr. Shreve. 

Education 26— Tests and Measurements in the Secondary 
School. 

Four hours, first semester, 11:00, M, W, Th, and F. 
Open to college students in the junior or senior year. 
The main topics are: the measurements of mental 
ability, tests for use in secondary schools, and sta- 
tistical methods applied to education. — Mr. White. 



BIOLOGY 

Mr. Roberts 



The schedule of courses in Biology is printed on pages 
57 and 58. 

A breakage fee of 50 cents for each laboratory course 
in Biology is charged, to be paid at the beginning of the 
semester. 

Biology 1 — Education Biology. 

Four hours, first semester. Three hours credit. A 
course designed primarily for the Two Year Normal 
curriculum's to give the student a good general under- 
standing of the great biological facts of life. The 
basic structure of plants and animals and their 
function, theories of the origin and evolution of living 
forms, heredity, eugenics and similar topics will be 
included. 



Fairmont State Normal School 55 



Biology 3 — Plant Biology. 

Six hours, first semester. Four hours credit. A gen- 
eral introduction to the important structures of plants 
and a study of their functions. The elementary 
physiological activities of plant life. 

Biology 4— General Zoology. (Omitted 1927-28). 

Six hours, second semester. Four hours credit. Lec- 
tures, recitations and laboratory work giving an in- 
troduction to the general principles of zoology. A 
study of types. 

Biology 7 Sp. — Spring Botany. 

iSix hours, spring term. One hour credit. Hours by 
arrangement. A course in the identification of spring 
flowers. Practice in the use of a flower manual. 
Field trips required. 

Biology 9S — Summer Botany. 

Ten hours, summer term. Four hours credit. Hours 
to be arranged. The study of summer plants, trees, 
flower structure, family characteristics and relation- 
ships. A course for biology teachers who want some- 
thing more than the ordinary type of "flower study". 
Field trips and individual collecting. 

Biology 16 — Conservation of West Virginia Wild Life. 

Two hours, first semester. Two hours credit. Con- 
servation in respect to our fish and game, forests 
and streams, wild flowers. The agencies for conser- 
vation and their purpose. A study of the forms de- 
serving consideration. The sources of information 
and materials for conservation work in the schools. 

Biology 18 — Economic Zoology. 

Two hours, second semester. Two hours credit. The 
study of those forms of animal life, both low and 
high which effect the life of man and his environment. 
Structure, food habits, breeding habits and Control 
measures are stressed. 



56 Fairmont State Normal School 



Biology 23 — General Botany. 

Six hours, second semester. Four hours credit. The 
morphology, reproduction and rise in complexity of 
plants, illustrated with selected types from the one- 
celled forms to the common seed plants. 

Biology 24 — General Entomology. 

■ 

Six hours, second semester. Four hours credit. The 
fundamentals of entomology, lectures, laboratory and 
field work dealing with the classification of insects, 
their morphology and reproduction. Field recognition 
of common species and methods of collecting. Col- 
lection required. Prerequisite Biology 4. 

Biology 27 — Botany of the Non-Flowering Plants. 

Six hours, first semester. Four hours credit. The 
study of the common species of algae, fangi, bryo- 
jphytes and ferns. Training in the technique of ident- 
ification and classification. Prerequisite Biology 23. 

Biology 28 — Vertebrate Zoology. 

'Six hours, second semester. Four hours credit. 
Studies of the classes of vertebrate animals and their 
organs and organ systems. Lectures, recitations and 
laboratory work. Prerequisite Biology 4. 



Fairmont State Normal School 



57 





to 














■>* 














eo 


bo 






































o 


Sea 












to 














C<I 












u 














© 


8 












3 

i 




^^ 












>» c 

6J3 O 

.2 '-3 


2 




Si 
I- 










*» 
2 




u 


s 




s 




** 


o 














© 












1 














i 














2 








































73 
















o 












S 


© 












# g 


iH 


























GO 














© 














CO 














St 

! 


US 

© 

o 


>> 
3 


9 th 






>> 

M 


<«H 




PQ 


m 


« 




B 


© 














© 




























3 
















o 












© 


© 












GO 




















>> 










\a 




fil 




bo 










-2rH 




>S r-l 






00 




'o 

s 




5 












>> 














03 














■t* 


>» 








>> 


>> 


m 


og 








gS 


CS 


0) 


T3 


>> 






P 





1 


3 


8 

3 






§ 


e 


£ 


^3 
Eh 





CQ 



58 



Fairmont State Normal School 





to 














•*; 














«o 














© 














us 














OJ 












u 














V 














•*J 














s 


{§ 












s 


»H 
















I- 




1 

Ooo 






*e 




o** 


ON 


©N 


"©N 




6 

o 
















m 


« 


s 


s 






© 
© 












i 
>> 














to 














^o 




























*o 














s 


© 
© 












.2 


»-l 


























S 


























j° 














1 


© 

© 


Is 


.2^ 


1 

3 N 




©00 

*** 


«*- 




s 


n 


n 




n 


o 














J8 




























p 














"8 


© 












JtS 


a> 












& 
















to 

00 




« 




■2°° 

n 












I 


>» 








>> 

•8 
g 


13 


i 


1 

Hi 

S3 


a 

IS 






i 


£ 


* 







Fairmont State Normal School 59 

CHEMISTRY 

Mr. Rogers Mr. Haught 

The schedule of courses in Chemistry, including labor- 
atory hours, is given on page — and — . Additional 
laboratory periods may 'be made by the instructors. 

A laboratory fee of $2.50 for each course in chemistry 
is charged, to be paid at the beginning of the semester. 

Chemistry 1 — General Chemistry. 

Five hours, first semester. Four hours' credit. There 
are two sections of Chemistry 1: section 1 designed 
for students who present a year of high school chem- 
istry for entrance and section 2 designed for those 
who have had no previous work in chemistry. Stu- 
dents who enter these sections should note the accom- 
panying ruled table and find therein a laboratory 
period for his particular section which does not con- 
flict with hours of other subjects desired. 
This course, though treated somewhat differently in 
the two sections, includes in both the essential sub- 
ject matter of the usual standard course of freshman 
college chemistry. 

(Section 1, 9:10, T, W, Th, F with laboratory sections 
on Mondays at 8:15 to 10:05 and 1:55 to 2:50; Sec- 
tion 2, 1:00 M, T, W, Th, F, with laboratory Tuesday, 
1:00 to 2:50. Mr. Rogers and Mr. Haught. 

Chemistry 2 — General Chemistry. 

Five hours, second semester. Four hours credit. A 
continuation of Chemistry 2. The laboratory work 
in the second half of this course is largely devoted 
to a study of qualitative analysis. Prerequisite: 
Chemistry 1. — Mr. Rogers and Mr. Haught. 

Chemistry 20 — Elementary Qualitative Chemical Analysis. 

Six hours, second semester. Three hours credit. This 
course trains the student to determine the composition 
of substances by a carefully arranged sequence of 
experiments. It is an essential preparation for more 
advanced courses in chemistry. It furnishes a review 
of the earlier work. Prerequisites: Chemistry 1 and 
2. — Mr. Rogers and Mr. Haught. 



60 Fairmont State Normal School 



Chemistry 21 — Elementary Quantitative Analysis. 

Seven hours, second semester. Four hours credit. 
Both (gravimetric and volumetric methods are includ- 
ed in the work of this course. Prerequisites: Chem- 
istry 1 and 2, Mathematics 3, 4 and 5. This course 
consists principally of laboratory work, for which 
three double periods are required. — Mr. Rogers and 
Mr. Haught. 

Chemistry 23 — Organic Chemistry. 

Five hours, first semester. Four hours credit. The 
course will consist of two lectures, supplemented by 
demonstrations, one quiz, and three hours of labora- 
tory work a week. This is the first half of the fund- 
amental course in organic chemistry. It is devoted 
to the organization and methods of preparation of 
the aliphatic hydrocarbons and their derivatives. This 
course is recommended to students of dietetics, agri- 
culture and biology, and should' be taken by all chem- 
istry majors. Prerequisites: Chemistry 2 and 2. If 
possible the student should also precede this course 
with Chemistry 20 and Physics 1 and 2 — Mr. Haught. 

Chemistry 24 — Organic Chemistry. 

Five hours, second semester. Four hours credit. A 
continuation of Chemistry 23. Prerequisite: Chem- 
istry 23. This course is devoted largely to a study 
of the coal tar compounds. Whenever possible, prac- 
tical applications are made to the arts and industries 
and useful illustrations are drawn from the students' 
own experience and knowledge. — Mr. Haught. 

Chemistry 25A — Teaching of Chemistry. 

Four hours, first semester. Two hours credit. Open 
to a limited number of students. Prerequisites: 
Chemistry 1, 2, 20, and 21. This course will include 
practice in construction of demonstration apparatus 
problems peculiar to laboratory instruction; a study 
of the educational values of chemistry, and the most 
approved methods and devices for presenting the 
science to 'beginners. The reading of chemical jour- 
nals and other reference work in the library is in- 
cluded. — Mr. Rogers. 



Fairmont State Normal School 61 



Chemistry 25B — Teaching of Chemistry. 

Four hours, second semester. A repetition of Chem- 
istry 25A. — Mr. Rogers. 

Chemistry 26— -Introduction to Physical Chemistry (Omit- 
ted in 27-28). 

Three hours, first semester; M, T, Th„ at 11:00. This 
course includes a study of the properties of solutions, 
ionization, chemical equilibria, kinetic theory of gases, 
and selected topics in photo-chemistry, thermo-chem- 
istry and electro-chemistry. Prerequisites: Chemistry 
1 and 2, Mathematics 1 to 5. — Mr. Rogers. 

Chemistry 27 — Introduction to Physiological Chemistry. 

Three hours, second semester, M, T, Th, at 11:00. 
Lectures and reference readings. No laboratory work 
acompanies this course, though experimental pro- 
jects may be assigned occasionally. The subjects 
treated include the chemical study of some funda- 
mental physiological processes: the chemistry of nu- 
trients, the products of metabolism, the physiological 
effect of several classes of drugs and toxic substan- 
ces. Prerequisites: Chemistry 1 and 2, Physical 
Education 1. — Mr. Rogers. 



62 



Fairmont State Normal School 



1 

OS 



© 
to 


1-4 

II 


eo 
J 

o 




g 
'R 

Pm 




o 

CI 

TO 

I 




o 

>» 

m 

1 








to 


it 

U 


© 
o 


I-H 

f.I 

II 


11 

O 


.3.2 


J] 


© 
© 


8 
'R 

Ph 


Ph 




b 

CO <J 

1 ** 


s 
1 

Ph 


Hi 
© 

o 


-t-» 
01 

1 W 

O 




1 
1« 




1 

03 

■a eo 

i n 

o 


o 

01 


I ? 


I ? 


£ a 

1 & 


2 2 

§1 

J3 CO 

o 


II 


oo 












1 


i 

3 

3 


E 


>i 

3 

3 

8 

3 
H 


I 

i 

t3 


T3 


'j-i 



Fairmont State Normal School 



63 































^ 
















e 
w» 


| 
















ca 


1 




















<f 






















M 


ca 


<M 
















u 

I 
1 


S 


I 

! 


>> 

1 

1 


03 

U 

'£ 

J3 
PL. 


IN 

I" 

.2 <5 

if 




1 




* 
1 




0} 

1 


"5 




N 


C^ 


N 


IN 


01 M 


c 
o 


© 


■9* 




! 






SI 

11 


1 


*** 

Be 

tn o 

rCOT 




60 




o 




V 




o 




o 




o 




.s 
























*OQ 




















93 


1 


IN 

J 


CO 

F 


c- 

«NN 

Si 

P 






1 5 


IN 

0} 

o 

J3 


1 
•IS 

cy<N 




P* 


o 


PhJ3 






o 


fe 


o 


►» 








o 












1^ 




















•4-» 














m 














s 


lO 


>> 




1 




fc 


4) 


© 
©" 


00 








Is 


X 
U 


'3 "* 




"5 ■"* 




'3 ■** 






A 




.fl 




J3 


# g 




O 




o 




o 
















09 














4> 














GO 






<N 


<N 


W 


<N 


fa 
g 

o 


© 


<N 

fie 


» ,0 

1 1 

.S TO 


.2 .2 

1 1 

X! TO 


fig 

.2 .2 

g i 

J5 TO 


ll 
II 




O 


O 


o 


o 


4) 




g 2 
1 | 










3 












•8 




« 4» 
X! TO 










^ 


10 


u 










w 


rH 












OB 


00 




















>> 












1 


I 


S3 

2 


>> 






i 


a 

1 




1 


i 


o 

9) 


3 


3 
'u 



64 Fairmont State Normal School 



ECONOMICS 

Mr. Pence 

Economics 1 — Principles of Economics. 

Three hours, first semester. 11:00, M, T, F. A 
general course in economic principles designed to ac- 
quaint the student with the major problems of pro- 
duction, value and exchange, money and banking, 
international trade and related subjects. 

Economics 2 — Principles of Economics. 

Three hours, second semester. 11:00, M, T, F. This 
course, a continuation of Economics 1, will involve 
a study of such topics of applied economics as rail- 
way problems, labor problems, trust problems, in- 
surance, in addition to the development of the prob- 
lem of distribution. 

Economics 3 — Economic History of the United States. 

Four hours, first semester. 1 :55, M, T, W, Th. This 
is a survey course of the economic development of 
the United States from colonial beginnigs to the pres- 
ent time. The various phases of our economic life 
will be considered topically, beginning with the basic 
industries, the secondary industries, banking, the tar- 
iff, labor organizations, and other related subjects. 

Economics 20 — Money, Credit and Banking. (Omitted 
1927-28.) 

Four hours, second semester. This course should fol- 
low Economics 1 and 2. Its aim is to present a 
survey of the general financial organization by 
means of which the industrial and commercial inter- 
ests of the country are handled. Particular atten- 
tion will be given to those agencies whose field is 
the encouragement of saving and investment. 

Economics 21 — Public Finance. 

Four hours, second semester. 1:55, M, T, W, Th. 
This course should follow Economics 1 and 2. Its 
purpose is the presentation of the theory of taxation 
with particular reference to existing systems employ- 
ed by federal, state and local governments. A vital 
part of the course will be special study of the prob- 
lems of public school finance. 



Fairmont State Normal School 65 

ENGLISH 

Mr. Barnes, Miss Lewis, Mrs. Morrow, Mr. Opp 

Miss Tate 

Courses required for English majors are marked with 
an asterisk. 

Either English 1 or 7 and either English 2 or 8 are 
required of all students. Students on entering school will 
take examinations to determine which courses they should 
study in. (Students are not required to take both English 
1 and English 7 and both English 2 and English 8; but 
those who have taken English 1 and 2 may then take 
also English 7 and 8. 

♦English 1A — Oral English Elements. 

Five hours, first semester, for half the semester. 
two and one-half hours' credit. First section, 8:15, 
M, T, W, Th, F, first half semester; second section, 
9:10, M, T, W, Th, F, last half semester; third section, 
1:00, M, T, W, Th, F, first half semester; English 1 
or English 7 required in all courses. This course in- 
cludes all the elementary phases of oral language 
training needed by teachers; enunciaiton, voice train- 
ing, public speaking, reading aloud, etc. — Mr. Opp. 

♦English IB— Oral English Elements. 

Five hours, second 1 semester, for half the semester. 
Two and one-half hours' credit. First section, 8:15, 
M, T, W, Th, F, first half semester; second section, 
9:10, M, T, W, Th, F, last half semester. A repeti- 
tion of English 1A. — Mr. Opp. 

♦English 2A — Written English Elements. 

Five hours, first semester, for half the semester. 
Two and one-half hours' credit. First section, 8:15, 
M, T, W, Th, F last half semester; second section, 
9:10, M, T, W, Th, F, first half semester; third sec- 
tion, 1:00, M, T, W, Th, F, last half semester; fourth 
section, 1:55, M, T, W, Th, F, first half semester. 
Required in all the courses. A study of punctuation, 
capitalization, spelling, and outlining, as well as form, 
neatness, etc.; themes twice a week. — Miss Lewis and 
Miss Tate. 



66 Fairmont State Normal School 



♦English 2B— Written English Elements. 

Five hours, second semester, for half the semester. 
Two and one-half hours' credit. First section, 8:15, 
M. T. W. Th, F, last half semester; second section, 
9:10, M, T, W, Th, F, first half semester. A repeti- 
tion of English 2A. — Miss Lewis and Miss Tate. 

English 3A— ^Story Telling. 

Two hours, first semester. 2:50, M, W. Required 
in the primary curriculum of the standard Normal 
course. iStudy of the nature and structure of chil- 
dren's stories, selection of stories, and much training 
in the telling of stories. — Miss Tate. 

English 3B— Story Telling. 

Two hours, second semester. 2:50, M, W. A repeti- 
tion of English 3A.— Miss Tate. 

English 4A — 'Children's Literature. 

Two hours, first semester. 11:00, M, Th. Required 
in the primary and intermediate curricula of the 
standard Normal course. A survey of the entire field 
of prose and poetry available and suitable for chil- 
dren in the elementary school. — Miss Tate. 

English 4B — Children's Literature. 

Two hours, second semester. 11:00, M. Th, A repeti- 
tion of English 4A. — Miss Tate. 

English 5A — Grammar. 

Two hours, first semester. 10:05, T, F. Designed 
for those who expect to teach English in the upper 
grades or junior high school. This course is designed 
to give teachers knowledge of the fundamentals of 
grammar. — Miss Lewis. 

English 5B — Grammar. 

Two hours, second semester. 10:05, T, F. A repeti- 
tion of English 5 A. — Miss Lewis. 



Fairmont State Normal School 67 



English 6 — Juvenile Literature. 

Two hours, first semester. 11:00, T, F. Designed 
for those who expect to teach literature in the upper 
^grades or junior high school. A survey of the best 
literature available for children in the upper grades, 
with special emphasis on literature for silent home 
reading. — Miss Tate. 

♦English 7A — 'Speech Arts. 

Five hours, first semester, for half the semester. 
Two and one-half hours' credit. First section, 8:15, 
M, T, W, Th, F, last half semester; second section, 
9:10, IM, T, W, Th, F, first half semester; third sec- 
tion, 1:00, M, T, W, Th, F, last half semester. Eng- 
glish 1 or* 7 required of all students. An introduc- 
tion to public speaking and dramatics. Oral inter- 
pretation of literature, and the principles of expres- 
sion. Much drill in the speech arts, including read- 
ing, speaking, and argumentation. — Mr. Opp. 

♦English 7B— Speech Arts. 

Five hours, second semester, for half the semester. 
Two and one-lhalf hours' credit. First section, 8:15, 
M, T, W, Th, F, last half semester; second section, 
9:10, M, T, W, Th, F, first half semester. A repeti- 
tion of English 7 A. — Mr. Opp. 

♦English 8A — Written Composition. 

Five hours, first semester, for half the semester. 
Two and one-half hours' credit. First section, 8:15, 
M, T, W, Th, F, first half semester; second semester, 
9:10, M, T, W, Th, F, last half semester; third sec- 
tion, 1:00, M, T, W, Th, F, first half semester; fourth 
section, lr55, M, T, W, Th, F, last half semester. 
English 2 or 8 required of all students. Designed to 
train Freshmen and Sophomores in the art of ex- 
pressing their experiences, observations and reflec- 
tions, in a clear and pleasing manner. Opportunity 
will be given for selecting the form and style best 
suited to the students' ability and preference. Pre- 
requisite, English 2.— Miss Lewis and Miss Tate. 



Fairmont State Normal School 



♦English 8B — Written Composition. 

Five 'hours, second semester, for half the semester. 
Two and one-half hours' credit. First section, 8:15, 
M, T, W, Th, F, first half semester; second section, 
9:10, M, T, W, Th, F, last half semester; third sec- 
tion, 1:00, M, T, W, Th, F, first half semester. A 
repetition of English 8A. — Miss Lewis and Miss Tate. 

English 9A — Studies in American Literature. 

Three hours, first semester. 9:10, M, Th, F. A gen- 
eral introduction to the different periods and the 
various types of American literature. Designed for 
college students wishing an elementary survey course, 
and for normal students wishing to become more 
familiar with authors whose writings they will teach 
in the elementary schools. — Mrs. Morrow. 

English 9B — Studies in American Literature. 

Three hours, second semester. 9:10, M, W, F. A 
repetition of English 9A. — Mrs. Morrow. 

♦English 10 — Recent Fiction. 

Three hours, second semester. 8:15, T, Th, F. Re- 
quired of English majors. Steady reading of the best 
of British and American fiction of our times, with 
collateral study of the larger literary movements in 
fiction. — Mr. Mercer. 

♦English 11 — Recent Poetry. 

Two hours, second semester. 11:00, M, Th. Required 
of English majors. Reading of much contemporary 
poetry, American and British, with discussions and 
lectures on the new poetry movement. — Miss Tate. 

English 12 — The Modern American Magazine. 

Two hours, first semester. 10:05, M, W. Reading of 
the best of the popular and literary magazines of 
today, with the effort to appraise and classify them. 
— Miss Lewis. 

English 13 — Recent Drama. 

Two hours, second semester. 1:00, T, Th. Study of 
many recent plays, British, Continental and Ameri- 
can. — Miss Tate. 



Fairmont State Normal School 69 



English 15 — Dramatization and Play Production. 

Two hours, first semester. 10:05, T, F. The coach- 
ing and the presenting of plays. This course is de- 
signed to acquaint students with the principles of 
dramatic expression, and pageantry, to equip them 
to select plays and adapt material, and to carry on 
dramatic activities in the schools where they teach. 
—Mr. Opp. 

English 16 — Extracurricular English Activities. 

Two hours either semester. One or two hours' credit. 
Hours to be arranged. An informal and flexible 
course. Any student or group of students engaged 
in activities that develop speech and literary ability, 
and who cannot be accommodated in any of the sec- 
tions, may, upon request, receive instruction in, super- 
vision of, and credit for this work. The amount of 
credit is to be determined by the supervisor, but 
shall not exceed two 'hours in any one semester, 
nor more than six hours in all. — Mr. Opp, Miss Tate, 
and Miss Lewis. 

16 (A) Oratory and Debate — Two hours, first 
semester. Work is continued into second semester 
by those making debate teams until debate season 
is over. Two hours' credit. Theory and practice of 
argumentation and debate. Should be taken by those 
interested in public speaking and those students de- 
siring to participate in intercollegiate debate and ora- 
torical contests. — Mr. Opp 

16 (!B) Journalism — One or two hours' credit. 
Offered both first and second semesters. Work is 
designed to enable students to acquire journalistic 
style and skill in newswriting and reporting. Should 
be taken by those desiring to work on the staff of 
the school paper for credit. Editor and Department 
editors may earn two hours' credit.— Mr. Opp. 

16 (C) Dramatics — One or two hours' credit. 
Offered both first and second semesters. Dramatic 
expression, theory and practice. Acting and staging 
of the one-act play. Should be taken by the mem- 
bers of the dramatic club desiring instruction and 
training for credit. — Mr. Opp. 



70 Fairmont State Normal School 

16 (D) iStory Telling— One hour credit. Offer- 
ed 'both first and second semesters. The aim of this 
work is to acquaint students with the art of story 
telling in school, community-club, and playground 
work. — Miss Tate. 

16 (E) Creative Writing — One to two hours' 
credit. Offered both first and second semesters. 
This is designed for those who wish to write in some 
of the professional or semi-professional types. All 
forms will be included: poetry, short stories, essays, 
etc. — Miss Lewis. 

English 24S — American Literature From 1870 to 1900. 

Four 'hours, summer, two hours' credit. A survey of 
the last thirty years before nineteen hundred in 
American literature. Much reading in all the prin- 
cipal authors. — Mrs. Morrow. 

♦English 25 — Nineteenth Century Literature. 

Four hours, first semester. 11:30, M, T, Th, F. Re- 
quired of English majors. A survey study of the 
essays and of the fiction and poetry of the nineteenth 
century. — Mrs. Morrow. 

English 29 — The Classical Age in English Literature. 

Two hours, second semester. 10:05, M, W. Study 
reading, for appreciation and comparative study, of 
the works of the chief writers of the eighteenth cen- 
tury, from Dryden to Goldsmith. — Miss Lewis. 

English 30 — Narrative and Descriptive Writing. 

Two hours, second semester. 10:00, T, Th, F. An 
advanced course, designed to give especially talented 
students an opportunity to receive training in these 
types of writing. Pre-requisite: English 8. — Miss 
Lewis. 

•English 31— ^Shakespeare. 

Three hours, second semester. 10:05, M, W, F. Re- 
quired of English majors. Reading of ten of the 
principal plays, with emphasis upon the literary and 
dramatic elements. — Mrs. Morrow. 



Fairmont State Normal School 71 



♦English 32— Middle English. 

Three hours, second semester. 9:10, M, W, F. Re- 
quired of English majors. Study of the chief writers 
of the middle English period, with chief emphasis on 
Chaucer, Langland and Gower. This is primarily a 
course in the English language. — Mr. Barnes. 

•English 33— The Bible. 

Three hours, first semester. 10:05, M, W, F. The 
aim of this course is to indicate the main literary 
types found in the Bible and to familiarize the stu- 
dent with the wealth and variety of its literature. A 
general knowledge of the Bible as a whole — its 
theme, structure, and books — will be given, but 
emphasis will be placed upon the literary elements 
in the Old Testament. — 'Mrs. Morrow. 

English 34 — The New Testament. 

Three hours, second semester. 11:00, M, T, F. An 
intensive study of the literary types and elements 
in the New Testaiment. — Mrs. Morrow. 

English 35 — Nature in Poetry. 

Two hours, second semester. 9:10, W, F. A care- 
ful study of nature as interpreted by Wordsworth, 
Byron, Shelley, Bryant, and Lowell. — Mrs. Morrow. 

English 36— The Short Story. 

Two hours, second semester. 1:00, T, Th. Much 
reading of specimens of the classic short-story, con- 
sidered as a type of prose narrative. — Miss Lewis. 

*English 37— Guided Reading. 

One hour, each semester for the four semesters of 
the junior and senior college years. Hours to be 
arranged. At least two hours' credit in this course 
must be earned by English majors; four hours may 
be taken. This course consists of free reading ac- 
cording to the individual student's interests and tastes, 
of note-book work, and of weekly conferences with 
the instructor. — Mr. Barnes. 



72 Fairmont State Normal School 

♦English 39 — Survey of British and American Literature. 

Four hours, first semester. 1:00, M, T, W, Th, Re- 
quired of English [majors. In this course, which 
should the taken in the senior college year, the student 
is given a chronological survey of the entire field of 
British and American literature, from the earliest 
times down to the present. Prerequisites: English 
10, 11, 25, 32.— Mrs. Morrow. 

♦English 41 A — Expository Writing. 

Two hours, first semester. 11:00, T, Th. Required 
of all college students in junior or senior year. De- 
signed to train in the making of expositions and the 
writing of papers upon themes of some difficulty. — 
Mr. Barnes. 

English 41B — Expository Writing. 

Two hours, second semester. 9:10, T, Th. A repe- 
tition of English 41A. — Mr. Barnes. 

♦English 42 — Public Speaking. 

Two hours, second semester. 1:00, M, W. Required 
of English majors. This course, to be taken in either 
the junior or senior college year, is designed to give 
students training in the art of preparing and deliver- 
ing public speeches. — Mr. Opp. 

♦English 47 — Teaching English in the High School. 

Two hours, first semester. 9:10, M, W. Required 
of English majors and of those preparing to teach 
English in the junior high school. Study of the 
modern method of teaching both literature and Eng- 
lish language in the junior and senior high school. 
Prerequisite or parallel: English 39. — Mr. Barnes. 



FINE ARTS 

Miss Briggs Miss Price 

Students majoring in Fine Arts may distribute the 
24 hours between Music and Art in any ratio they desire, 
but it is recommended that the ratio be about 16 to 8 
between the two subjects. Courses starred in Art must 
be taken by those offering most of their major in Art; 
courses starred in Music must be taken by those offering 
most of their major in music. 

Students selecting Music must satisfy the instructor 
as to their ability to sing and to play the piano acceptably. 



Fairmont State Normal School 73 

ART 

Art 3 — Primary Construction. 

Two hours, first semester. One hour credit. 1:53, 
M, W. All kinds of handwork suitable for the first 
four grades are planned in this course. Exercises 
in weaving, folding and cutting. 

♦Art 4 — Advanced Construction. 

Two hours, first semester. One hour credit. 1:55, T, 
Th. Construction problems suitable for the Junior 
and Senior High Schools are planned, such as port- 
folios, books, boxes, lanterns, candle shades, etc. 
Emphasis placed on the design. 

*Art 5A — Elementary School Art Methods. 

Four hours, first semester. Two hours' credit. First 
section, 10:10, M, T, Th, F; second section, 1:00, M, 
T, W, Th. Required of Standard Normal students 
enrolled in the primary and intermediate curriculum. 
It is the aim in this course to study the different sys- 
stems of public school art and to make an illustrated 
note book outlining the work for the first five grades. 

Art 5B — Elementary School Art Methods. 

Four hours, second semester. Two hours' credit. 
11:00, M, T, Th, F. A repetition of Art 5A. 

*Art 20 — Art Appreciation. 

Three hours, first semester. Two hours' credit. 9:15, 
M, W, F. This course includes a series of talks on 
architecture, painting, sculpture, and the minor arts, 
with the aim of awakening understanding and en- 
joyment. 

Art 21 — Perspective. 

Two hours, first semester. 9:15, T, Th. This course 
includes the study of the common forms about us 
and the principles governing the expression of these 
objects as found in cylindrical and rectangular per- 
spective. Mediums used: pencil charcoal, water color. 



74 Fairmont State Normal School 



*Art 22— Design. 

Four hours, second semester. Two hours' credit. 
11:00, M, T, Th, F. This course includes the study 
of the principles of design. Original designs applied 
in leather-stenciling, block printing, etc. 

*Art 23— High School Art Methods. 

Four hours, second semester. Two hours ' credit. 
9:15, M, T, W, F. An illustrated note book will be 
made outlining work for the Junior and Senior High 
schools. Class room discussion of lesson plans. Ob- 
servation and practice teaching. Prerequisite, Art 5. 



MUSIC 
*iMusic 2A — Elementary School Methods and Materials. 

Four hours, first semester. Two hours' credit. First 
section, 11:00, M, F, Th, F; second section, 2:50, M, 
T, W, Th. Required in the primary and intermediate 
curricula of the Standard Normal course and re- 
quired of Fine Arts majors. The teaching of music 
in Grades 1 to 6. The purpose of this course is to fit 
students to teach music in the kindergarten and first 
six years in the public schools. The salient features 
of this course are: a treatment of the child voice, a 
study of the tonal and rhythmic problems of each 
grade, ear training, melody writing, sight reading, 
and part singing a study of the song material adapt- 
ed to each grade, the use of the phonograph to de- 
velop musical programs, and some work in apprecia- 
tion. 

Music 2B — Elementary School Methods and Materials. 

Four hours, second semester. Two hours' credit. 
First section. 11:00, M, T, Th, F; second section, 2:50, 
M, T, W, Th. A repetition of Music 2A. 

*Music 3— Glee Club. 

Two hours, first semester. One hour credit. 3:45, 
M, W, and other hours to be arranged. This course 
consists of voice and chorus training, sight-singing 
in parts, position, breathing, enunciation, attack, tone 
production, formation of habits essential to a good 



Fairmont State Normal School 75 

chorister. Cantatas and choruses suitable for high 
and normal schools, choirs and choral societies are 
studied and sung at public concerts. 

*Music 4— Glee Club. 

Two hours, second semester. One hour credit. 3:45, 
M, W. A continuation of Music 3. 

♦Music 5 — Orchestra. 

Two hours, first semester. One hour credit. 3:45, 
T, Th. The school maintains an orchestra which fur- 
nishes music for various entertainments. Students 
who play any orchestral instruments are urged to 
make it known to the director of music. 

♦Music 6 — Orchestra. 

Two hours, second semester. One hour credit. 3:45, 
T, Th. A continuation of Music 5A. 

♦Music 10 — Ear Training, Sight Reading, and Dictation. 

Four hours, second semester. Two hours' credit. 
1:00, M, T, Th, F. Completion of the course requires 
facility in reading at sight, either with the Latin 
syllables or with the text, the music in the standard 
texts as used in the elementary schools. The study 
of tone and rhythm, gaining power to recognize, vis- 
ualize, sing and 1 write melodic phrases, in all keys, 
completing the ear training outlined for the sixth 
year in the public schools. 

Music 20 — Music, Appreciation and History of Music. 

Four hours, first semester. 1 :55, M, T, W, Th. This 
course has for its aim pleasure in listening to inter- 
esting music, and is valuable to the rural teacher as 
well as to teachers in graded schools. No musical 
requirements are necessary for entrance. The most 
modern methods of presenting music appreciation 
with the aid of the talking machine will be discussed 
and demonstrated. The music material used will be 
presented in sequence, showing its development as to 
form and types of composition. This will establish 
an appreciation of its consistency as an art, show its 
possibilities as subject matter of educational value 
and develop a background upon which to base meth- 
ods of procedure in teaching appreciation. Two peri- 



76 Fairmont State Normal School 



ods each weeks are devoted to the study of music and 
musicians from the earliest available records up to 
and including modern times; stories of operas; cur- 
rent events, including knowledge of well-known pres- 
ent day orchestras, music festivals, composers, sing- 
ers, players, conductors, and music critics. 

Music 22 — Harmony. 

Four hours, second semester. 1:55, M, T, W, Th. 
Admission to this course requires a working knowl- 
edge of the rudiments of music. Intervals, scales, 
chord structure and simple harmonization based upon 
tonal tendencies and rhythmic effects. Form as a 
factor in the selection of harmonies and their inver- 
sions. Application of these principles in the har- 
monization of melodies, using the primary harmonies. 
Some work will be done in writing original melodies, 
introducing the technical problems of the grades and 
also some practical work at the piano. 

*Music 24 — High School Methods and Materials. 

Four hours, first semester. Two hours' credit. 1:00, 
M, T, Th, F. Required of Music Majors. Teaching 
of music in junior and senior high schools. This 
course is open 1 to those Who plan to teach music in 
all grades and junior and senior high, and who have 
completed Music 2, or those who plan to teach music 
in junior or senior high only. The various problems 
of the junior high will be discussed in detail. Stuly 
of methods of organizing and conducting a high 
school department of music, including choruses, glee 
clubs, orchestras, classification of voices, theory, mu- 
sic appreciation, art of chorus accompaniment, etc. 
Materials for such classes and organizations will be 
discussed. 



FRENCH 

Miss Ice 
French 1 — Beginners* Course. 

Four hours, first semester. 8:15, T, W, Th, F. Ele- 
ments of grammar; pronunciation; phonetics; regular 
and common and irregular verbs; simple vocabulary; 
reading of easy prose; oral and written composition. 
Fraser and Squair r s New French Grammar. 



Fairmont State Normal School 77 



French 2 — Beginners' Course. 

Four hours, second semester. 8:1'5, T, W, Th, F. 
Continuation and completion of elementary grammar; 
reading of selections of prose and poetry; oral and 
written composition; dictation; emphasis on careful 
pronunciation. 

French 20 — Modern Prose and Plays. 

Four hours, first semester. 11:00, M, T, Th, F. 
Reading of short stories, easy drama and novels; sys- 
tematic gaining of a serviceable reading vocabulary 
for literature; review of grammar with special study 
of the irregular verbs; practice in speaking and writ- 
ing. 

French 21 — Modern Prose and Plays. 

Four hours, second semester. 11:00, M, T, Th, F. 
Continuation of French 20. 

French 22 — Introduction to French Literature (Omitted 
1927-28.) 

Three hours, first semester. 11:00, T, Th, F. Study 
of representative authors of various periods; expres- 
sive reading and imparting of literary appreciation. 

French 23 — Introduction to French Literature (Omitted 
1927-28.) 

Three hours, second semester. 11:00, T, Th, F. Con- 
tinuation of French 22. 

French 24 — Advanced Composition (Omitted 1927-28.) 

One hour, first semester. 11:00, M. Must be taken 
with French 22 or preceded by it. 

French 25— -Advanced Composition (Omitted 1927-28). 

One hour, second semester. 11:00 M. Continuation 
of French 24. 



78 Fairmont State Normal School 

GEOGRAPHY 

Miss Fitzgibbon 

Geography 1 — Physical Geography of Lands. 

Four hours, first semester. 11:00, M, T, Th, F. An 
introductory course of practical value to teachers. 
It deals primarily with the land forms, their changes 
and influence on man. Chief topics considered; soils, 
surface, and underground water vegetation, diastro- 
phrism, vulcanism, glaciation, erosion, physiographic 
divisions of United States. 

Geography 2 — Climate and Life. 

Four hours, second semester. 11:00, M, T, Th, F. 
A practical course of general value. An introductory 
consideration of meterology, oceanography, and cli- 
matology. Chief topics; earth as a globe, geographic 
effect of rotation and revolution, ocean currents, in- 
fluence of tides and waves, world distribution of 
population. 

Geography 10 iSp — Geography for the Elementary Grades. 

Four (hours, spring term, 10:05. Two hours' credit. 
Materials and topics suitable for these grades will 
be discussed in this course. 

Geography 14 — Geography of North America. 

Four hours, first semester. 9:10, M, T, Th, F. A 
study of the natural regions of United States: their 
influence on man, man's response. Prerequisite or 
parallel: Geography 1 or 2. 

Geography 24 — Economic and Political Geography of the 
World. 

Four hours, first semester. 10:05, M, T, W, F. A 
study of the geographic economic and historical fac- 
tors affecting current international problems. Pre- 
requisite: Geography 1 or 2. 



Fairmont State Normal School 79 



Geography 26 — Conservation of Natural Resources. 

Four hours, second semester. 9:15, M, T, Th, F. The 
Natural resources of United States as they have in- 
fluenced national development, exploitation of min- 
erals, forests, soils, conservation movements, water 
ways, water power, reclamation of swamps and arid 
lands. Prerequisite or parallel: Geography 20. 



Geography 28 — Geography in American History. 

Four hours, second semester. 8:15, M, T, W, F. A 
study of the geographic conditions which have in- 
fluenced the course of American History. 



HISTORY 

Mr. Boughter Miss Prichard Mr. Pence 

History 1 — American History. 

Three hours, first semester. 8:15, T, W. F. This 
is a general survey course in American History from 
the time of the discovery of America to the election 
of Jackson in 1828. The European background of 
American history is given generally, with a compara- 
tive history of the varied colonial movements in the 
New World, attention being paid to the colonial po- 
litical and social institutions and the relations of the 
European countries to their colonies. The last half 
of the term is devoted to the tracing of the growth of 
the national movement and the evolution of Demo- 
cracy, the organization of the government, the west- 
ward expansion of territory and the development of 
sectionalism. — Mr. Boughter. 

History 2 — American History. 

Three hours, second semester. 8:15 T, W, F. A 
continuation of History 1. Beginning with the 
administration of Andrew Jackson this course traces 
the operation of the spirit of Manifest Destiny, the 
development of the slavery controversy, the conduct 
of the Civil War, the process of Reconstruction, the 
increase of national economic importance, the policy 
of the United States in International politics, and 
the participation of the United States in the World 
War. — Mr. Boughter. 



80 Fairmont State Normal School 



History 3. — Modern European History. 

Four hours, first semester. 1:00, M, T, W, Th. This 
course traces the development of Modern Europe to 
the time of the French Revolution. It is especially 
concerned with such major movements as the Renais- 
sance, the Commercial Revolution, and the Reforma- 
tion. — Mr. Pence. 

History 4 — Modern European History. 

Four hours, second semester. 1:00, M, T, W, Th. 
The scope of this course is the period of the 19th 
century and the first quarter of the present century. 
As a continuation of History 3, this course will show 
the wider effects of the French Revolution upon the 
life of European peoples, and will trace the rise of 
nationalism, imperialism, and other factors contribu- 
tory to the Great War.— Mr. Pence. 

History 9 — The European Background of American His- 
tory. 

Three hours, first semester. 9:10 T, W, F. This 
course is intended primarily for those preparing to 
teach in the elementary schools. The history of 
America is placed in the larger background of the 
world. The course deals with the steps in the prep- 
aration of the old world for the new, the political 
background of the old world in the settlement of 
the new, the struggle of the old world for the new, 
and the relationships of Europe to the colonies and 
then to the United States. — Mr. Boughter. 

^History 10A — The History of West Virginia and the 
Trans -Allegheny Frontier. 

Three hours, first semester, 10:05, T, W, F. This 
course is intended primarily for those preparing to 
teach in the elementary schools. The history of 
Western Virginia as a part of the colony of Vir- 
ginia, of Western Virginia as the outlying section of 
the state of Virginia, and of West Virginia as the Com- 
monwealth of West Virginia is traced. Special atten- 
tion is given to the regional and national relations of 
the section; the process of the formation of the state 
and the political, social and economic development of 
the state. — Mr. Boughter. 






Fairmont State Normal School 81 

History 10B — The Histoyr of West Virginia and the Trans- 
Allegheny Frontier. 

Three hours, second semester. 10:05, T. W. F. A 
repetition of History 10A. — "Mr. Boughter. 

History 11 — Social and Industrial History of England. 

Four hours, second semester. 9:10, M. T. Th, F. The 
aim of the course is to give the student an appreciai- 
tion of the importance and significance of the pres- 
ent day social and economic condiitons and move- 
ments in England. A brief summary of the social 
and economic 'background of England prior to the 
eighteenth century — a topical presentation of the 
social and economic developments in England begin- 
ning with the eighteenth century. — Miss Prichard. 

History 12 — History of the Middle Ages. 

Four hours, second semester. 2:50, M, T, W. Th. 
This course is designed to bridge the gap between 
the history of the Roman Empire and that of the 
Modern European states, about 600 to 1500. Chiefy 
concerned with such great movements as rise and 
decline of Charlemagne's Empire, monasticism, rise 
of towns, the Crusades, the Renaissance. — Miss 
Prichard. 

History 20— The History of Civilization. 

Three hours, first semester. 1:55, M, T, Th. A gen- 
eral survey of the history and contributions of an- 
cient and medieval peoples. A comparative study of 
the civilizations of Egypt, Sumeria, Persia, Judea, 
Phoenica, Greece, Rome, China, and India with the 
purpose of showing the development in Politics, 
Economics, iSocial Institutions, Education, Philoso- 
phy, Religion, Art and Literature. — Mr, Boughter. 

History 21— The History of Civilization. 

Three hours, second semester. 1:55, M, T, Th.. A 
continuation of History 20. A general survey of the 
•history and contributions of medieval and modern in- 
stitutions. A study of the Feudal System, the Ren- 
aissance and the Protestant Revolution is made. A 
comparative study of the development of the rival 
European nations with special reference to the In- 
dustrial Revolution, the Political Revolutions, the rise 
of nationalism and the growth of imperialism. — Mr. 
Boughter. 



Fairmont State Normal School 



History 22 — Constitutional History of England. 

Four hours, first semester. 1:00, T, W, Th. F. The 
purpose of this course is to show the evolution of 
the British government from the beginning to the 
present and to trace in detail the establishment of the 
English governmental institutions. — Mr. Boughter. 

History 23 — History of the Foreign Policy of the United 
States. 

Four hours, second semester. 1:00, T, "W, Th, F. 
A longitudinal development of the relationships of 
the thirteen colonies and the nation of the United 
States with other nations, aiming to show the gen- 
eral policy and conduct of foreign affairs. Pre- 
requisite: History 1 and 2. — Mr. Boughter. 

History 24 — History of Latin America (Omitted 1927-28) 

Four hours, second semester. The aim of the course 
will be to present to the student the material for 
forming a clear conception of the position and im- 
portance of the Latin American states in the politi- 
cal and economic life of the Western Hemisphere. 
Chief emphasis upon the period since the states gained 
their independence from Spain; special attention to 
the diplomatic and other relations with the United 
States. Prerequisite: History 1 and 2. 

History 25 — Contemporary History (Omitted 1927-28). 

Two hours, first semester. This course is an intensive 
study of the contemporary history in its political, 
economic, national and international complications of 
one of the following areas: (a) The United States 
and Latin America; (b) The European Nations; (c) 
The Near East and Africa; (d) the Far East. Special 
attention will be given to the study of the World War 
and the problems of Reconstruction as related to the 
area under consideration. The contemporary prob- 
lems, their present status and probable solution will 
be taken up during the last weeks of the term. Con- 
temporary History of the Far East offered Spring 
term 1927. Each of the units listed under History 25 
will carry two hours' credit. A student not majoring 
in history will receive credit for 4 hours. A history 
major can receive credit for 8 hours contemporary 
history. 



Fairmont State Normal School 83 

History 26 — The Teaching of iSocial Sciences in the Junior 
and Senior High School. 

Two hours, second semester. 9:10 T, Th. Designed 
for college seniors who are preparing to teach the 
Social Sciences in the 'high school. A consideration 
in the aims of teaching Civics, History, Economics 
and Sociology in the High School, the Social Sciences 
recitation, methods of procedure, collateral reading, 
written work, etc. Special attention is given to the 
secondary school curruculum in West Virginia and 
to the review of current text books adapted to the 
course of study. — Mr. Boughter. 

History 27 — The Interpretation of History. 

Two hours, second semester. 9:10, W, F. Required 
of seniors majoring in history. This course aims to 
present to the student the purpose and scope of his- 
tory. A brief history of history is considered to- 
gether with the problems of bibliography, historical 
construction, and historical methods.— Mr. Boughter. 



HOME ECONOMICS 

Foods and Cooking — Miss Gaskill 
Clothing — Miss Compton 

The schedule of courses is on pages 87-88. This in- 
cludes both recitation and laboratory hours. Courses 
marked with stars are required of majors in Home 
Economics. 

Home Economics 1 — Elementary Foods and Cookery. 

iSeven hours, first semester. One discussion period 
and two three-hour laboratory periods. Four hours 
credit. A study of foods in relation to source, com- 
position, characteristics, nutritive value, digestion, 
cost and place in the daily diet. Special attention 
given to the development of ease and accuracy in the 
cooking of type foods, and to gaining definite stand- 
ards for preparing dishes of these foods. 



84 Fairmont State Normal School 



*Home Economics 23 — Home Cookery and Table Service. 

Seven hours, second semester. One discussion period 
and two three-hours laboratory periods. Four hours' 
credit. Required of Home Economics majors. A 
more advanced Cookery course, making use of prin- 
ciples and processes learned in preceding courses. 
Meals will be planned and executed with emphasis on 
marketing and serving. Prerequisites: Home Econo- 
mics 1. 



♦Home Economics 22 — Nutrition. 

iSix hours, first semester. Three one-hour lecture 
periods and one two-hour laboratory periods per 
week. Four hours' credit. This course deals with 
food as building and regulating materials in relation 
to the chemistry of physiology and digestion; the 
quantitative basis in the selection of food for the 
normal adults and children. Practical work in plan- 
ning meals to meet the needs of individual members 
of the class and a very brief survey of the place of 
nutrition as a part of the health program. Pre- 
requisite: Home Economics 3 and Chemistry 1. 

•Home Economics 21. — Housewifery and Home Manage- 
ment. 

Five 'hours, second semester. One two-hour labora- 
tory periods, two one-hour discussion periods. Three 
hours' credit. This course deals with the division of 
space in the house; plumbing, heating and lighting; 
equipment and labor-saving devices, household sup- 
plies, storage, cleaning and care of rooms. Part of 
the time will be devoted' to the general management 
of the house; family income; household accounting; 
budgets; business principles applicable to the house- 
hold and system in the house. 

*Home Economics 20 — Home Nursing and Child Care. 

Two weeks, first semester. Two one-hour periods per 
week. Cause and prevention of sickness. The nurse, 
the care of the patient and the sickroom. Communi- 
cable diseases and emergencies. The care and feed- 
ing of infants and children in the home; school and 
home problems relating to the 'health of children. 



Fairmont State Normal School 85 



♦Home Economics 29 — Home Economics Methods. 

Three hours, first semester. Required of Home Eco- 
nomics majors. A study of the development of edu- 
cation for women'; the organization of material for 
home economic education. Emphasis is placed upon 
the course of study and lesson plans for the elemen- 
tary grades and high school; equipment, text books, 
administrative problems, reference and illustrative 
material. Half of the time will be devoted to cloth- 
ing and half to foods. Prerequisite: All required 
Home Economic courses and Education 20 and 22. 

Home Economics 2 — Elementary Clothing. 

Seven hours, first semester, four hours* credit. One 
class hour and two three-hour laboratory periods. 
This course deals with the fundamental principles of 
construction and practice in fundamental processes. 
Emphasis is placed upon suitability of material and 
economical purchasing. Use of commercial patterns 
with some drafting combination of machine and hand 
sewing. Color and line problems as related to dress 
will be studied. tSome time is devoted to the history 
and use of various textile fibers. 

Home Economics 24 — Advanced Clothing. 

Seven hours, second semester, four hours' credit. One 
class hour and two three-hour laboratory periods. 
This course provides instruction in planning, buying, 
cutting, fitting and making of dreses. Emphasis is 
placed on igood design, choice of materials, use and 
adaptation of commercial patterns. A detailed study 
of various textiles is given careful consideration, 
study of clothing budget will also be made. Pre- 
requisite: Home Economics 2. 

*Home Economics 26 — Costume Design. 

Five hours, second semester. Three hours' credit. 
One class hour and two two-hour laboratory periods. 
Required of Home Economics majors. This course 
aims to give opportunity for individual expression of 
artistic taste in dress. Costumes are designed on 
paper with (pencil and brush. The designs are then 
produced in cloth. Prerequisites: Home Economics 2 
and Art 1. 



Fairmont State Normal School 



*Home Economics 25 — Millinery. 

Four hours, first semester, two hours' credit. Two 
two-hour laboratory periods. Required of Home Eco- 
nomics majors. This course aims to teach practical 
millinery. It includes remodeling' and the making, 
covering, and trimming of crinoline and willow 
frames. Consideration is given to types of hats and 
their suitability to the wearer. Prerequisite: Home 
Economics 2. 

♦Home Economics 27 — Children's Clothing. 

Four hours, second semester, two hours' credit. Two 
two-hour laboratory periods. Required of Home Eco- 
nomics majors. This course includes the planning, 
purchasing and making of children's clothing, con- 
sidering hygiene, comfort, beauty, and practicability. 
In the laboratory special emphasis is laid upon ma- 
chine work, use of machine attachments, and easy 
decorative schemes. The child's clothing budget is 
also a feature of this course. Prerequisite: Home 
Economics 2. 

*Home Economics 28 — Home Planning and Furnishing. 

Five hours, first semester, three hours' credit. One 
class hour and two two-hour laboratory periods. Re- 
quired of Home Economics majors. This course aims 
to establish sound principles for home-making. A 
study of the evolution of the home; modern houses; 
location; construction, drainage, ventilation, lighting, 
heating and water supply from a scientific, sanitary, 
economic, and artistic standpoint. The study also 
includes simple interiors; period and modern furni- 
ture; choice and arrangement of furnishings for the 
home. Prerequisite: Art 1. 



Fairmont State Normal School 



87 






lO 
























■*tj 
























ec 




























n 












w 


to 






10 








w 








*3 


.y 






OJ 




1 

8^ 




Q 

c 
8^ 








i 

8 00 


I 

Is 


























a> 












<D 


0) 














§ 








| 


1 






*"* 




W 




w 








W 


w 






o 
























© 
















































© 
























© 
























,_, 
















































Id 
























© 
























© 


































o 




u 




















a 




w 








W 
















a>© 






t> 




os 















§ 






1 

C 


g<N 







c 






« 




w 






« 






















8n 






















W «N 








<u 

s 


1 


V 


u 






A 


A 


s 








01 © 


S*£ 


4)© 








2S 


a,eq 


oo 


gN 


w 


I" 


r 


J" 






r 


w 


r 




w 




w 


w 


w 






w 


H 




H 








>> 












>» 






f 


>> 


,§ 


CIS 

93 


1 


>• 


I 




>> 




-1 


>> 


,2 


1 


1 


I 




•a 


-a 

1 
CO 


13 
C 
6 




i 







Fairmont State Normal School 



t 




krt 
























•* 
























eo 


























09 












to 










1a 


.2 




.2 








U 




.a 






<N 


I 




f 








I 




I 
























§ 




$ 








0> 




« 






us 






i 








I 




i 








w 




H 








H 




w 






O 
























o 
























" 
































« 












y 




o 
o 








cyoo 


CO 

u 




8 






0)(O 


CO 


•H 




i 




{* 


s 




§ 






ccm 


1 






a 




W 


£ 




8 






w 


2 






o oo 






§00 












8«3 

w* 4 




























0) 












0) 


o 


§ 


§ 
o 


CO 
W 




1 




S 

o 








h o 


o 


1 


W 


I 




X 




M 








« 
























I 

M 




0) 

a 

o 

w 








eg 


o 


ep 




V 


o 










o 


8 


1 




I s 
















w 


H 


w 




H 




« 








o 
















w 




H 




H 
















0>O5 




0>OJ 




0>O5 














oo 


r 




| CM 

o 
H 






H 




















t» 






_ 






te 






5 






<s 

i 


1 

2 


>> 


to 


>> 


>> 

T3 


M 

13 
CO 

0) 

a 


R 


& 


2 




1 


j 
& 


>9 


I 

CO 




1 


1 
£ 


T3 






Fairmont State Normal School 



LATIN 

Mr. Mercer 

Latin 1 — Introduction to Latin. 

Four "hours, first semester. 11:00, M, T, Th, F. This 
course is an introduction to the study of Latin. It 
includes drill on vocabulary, syntax, and; easy trans- 
lation. Much attention is given to a comparison with 
English grammar and to word formation and deriva- 
tion. It is intended to prepare students for the read- 
ing of Latin of average difficulty and to furnish a 
basis for future study. 

Latin 2 — Introduction to Latin. 

Four hours, second semester. 11:00, M, T, Th, F. 
A continuation of Latin 1. 

Latin 11 — Latin Translation. 

Four hours, first semester. 1 :55, M, T, W, Th. This 
is chiefly a course in translation and drill on syntax 
and other topics introduced in the first year. Stress 
is laid on ancient customs and ideas in connection 
with the texts read. Sight-translation is given an 
important place to help the student put in practice 
his knowledge of word formation and construction. 

Latin 12 — Latin Translation. 

Four ihours, second semester. 1:55, M, T, W, Th. A 
continuation of Latin 11. 



MATHEMATICS 

Mr. McOarty Mr. Mercer 

Mathematics 1 will be waived upon satisfactory exam- 
ination. 

Mathematics 1A — Teachers' Arithmetic. 

Three hours, first semester. 9:10, M, W, F. Re- 
quired of all students taking the intermediate or 
junior high curriculum. The course includes a study 
of the principles, processes, and history of arithmetic, 
and much drill in the solution of problems. All of 
the important topics of arithmetic are considered 
from the viewpoint of the teacher. — Mr. McCarty. 



90 Fairmont State Normal School 

Mathematics IB — Teachers' Arithmetic. 

Three hours, second semester. 10:05, M, T, F. A 
repetition of Mathematics 1A — Mr. McCarty. 

Mathematics 2 — Algebra. 

Two hours, first semester. 9:10, T, Th. For those 
offering only one unit of algebra for entrance. A 
rigid review of elementary algebra, and in addition 
the general methods of factoring, radicals, quadratics, 
graphs, progression, and the binomial theorem. — 
Mr. McCarty. 

Mathematics 4 — Plane Geometry. 

Five hours, first semester. 9:10, M, T, W, Th, F. 
Open to first year students not offering plane geom- 
etry for entrance. The usual theorems are supple- 
mented with numerous exercises and original con- 
struction problems. — Mr. Mercer. 

Mathematics 5 — Solid Geometry. 

Four hours, second semester. 10:05, M, T, W, F. 
Open to first and second year students not offering 
this subject for entrance. This course includes the- 
orem of lines, planes and solids. Emphasis is placed 
upon original exercises and construction and the na- 
ture of mathematical proof. — Mr. Mercer. 

Mathematics 20 — Trigonometry. 

Four hours, first semester. 10:05, M, T, W, F. The 
development and use of trigonometric functions, re- 
lations between functions, logarithms, and solution of 
triangles. Applications of functions and formulae 
are made by the use of many practical problems. 
Prerequisites: Mathematics 2 and 4. — Mr. Mercer. 

Mathematics 22— College Geometry (Omitted 1927-28). 

Four hours, second semester. 10:05, M, T, W, F. An 
extension of the principles and proofs of plane geom- 
etry, including Homothetic figures, the Nine-point 
Circle, harmonic ranges, inversions, and the geometry 
of the triangle. Recommended for Mathematics ma- 
jors and minors. Prerequisites: Mathematics 4 and 
20. — Mr. Mercer. 



Fairmont State Normal School 91 



Mathematics 24 — College Algebra. 

Four hours, second semester. 9:10, T, W, Th, F. A 
study of the general quadratic and simultaneous 
quadratic equations, progressions, variation, logar- 
ithms, mathematical induction, functions, theory of 
equations, permutations, combinations and determin- 
ants. Prerequisite: Mathematics 2. — Mr. McCarty. 

Mathematics 26 — Analytic Geometry. 

Four hours, first semester. 8:15, T, W, Th, F. A 
brief practical treatment of the system of coordinates, 
'geometric magnitudes, loci, and their equations. The 
straight line, circle, parabola, ellipse and hyperbola. 
Exercises illustrating the analytic method are stress- 
ed throughout the course. Prerequisites: Mathe- 
matics 20 and 24. — Mr. McCarty. 

Mathematics 28 — Calculus. 

Four hours, second semester. 8:15 or 10, T, W, Th, F. 
The fundamental principles and idea of calculus and 
its application to the sciences and other mathematics. 
A brief treatment of limits, differentiation, summa- 
tion, algebraic, trigonometric, and logarithmic func- 
tions, series and integration. Prerequisites: Mathe- 
matics 24 and 26. — Mr. McCarty. 

Mathematics 30 — Teaching of Secondary Mathematics — 
(Omitted 1927-28). 

Three hours, first semester. 9:10, M, W, F. This 
course is designed to meet the needs of teachers of 
mathematics in the junior and senior high schools. 
An examination of mathematics as found in the pres- 
ent day courses of study. Aims of mathematical 
instruction; selection, and organization of subject 
matter and the approved methods of teaching. Pre- 
requisite: twelve hours of college mathematics. 

Mathematics 32 — History of Mathematics. 

Two hours, second semester. 11:00, T, Th. To give 
teachers and students of mathematics a knowledge 
and appreciation of the historical development of the 
high school subjects: arithmetic, algebra, geometry, 
and trigonometry. Some attention is also given to 
the development of method. Prerequisites: twelve 
hours of College Mathematics. — Mr. McCarty. 



92 Fairmont State Normal School 

NATURE STUDY 

Mr. Roberts Miss Fitzgibbon 

Nature Study 1A — General Nature Study. 

Four hours, first semester. Two hours' credit. First 
section. 9:10, M, T, Th. Fri; second section, 1:00-2:50 
M. W. The presentation of seasonal material de- 
signed to exemplify Nature Study aims and ideals, 
to combat nature superstitions and to furnish a mass 
of sound, teachable Nature Study information. 

Nature Study IB — General Nature Study. 

Four hours, second semester. Two hours' credit. 
First section, 9:10, M, T, Th, F; second section, 1:00- 
2:50, M, W. A repetition of Nature Study 1A. 

Nature Study 10 Sp— Bird Study. 

Four hours, spring term. One hour's credit. 6:20- 
8:15 A. M., T, W, Th, F. The study of our common 
birds and their identification by sight and song. Con- 
sists entirely of field work. Additional time required 
of the student in individual study. 



PHYSICS 

Mr. Haught 



The schedule of courses in Physics, including labora- 
tory hours, is given on page 62 and 63. 

Physics 1 — General Physics. 

Five hours, first semester. Four hours' credit. 11:00, 
M, T, F, and a two-hour laboratory period Thursday 
beginning at 1:00. Those who cannot reserve the 
designated laboratory period should consult the in- 
structor before completing arrangements for other 
courses. The aim of this course is not only to famil- 
iarize the student with many of the facts, phenomena 
and laws concerning mechanics, heat, light, sound 
and electricity, but to train in the methods of science 
and in scientific thinking. Stewart's College Physics 
is the text. Prerequisites: Mathematics 2, 3 and 20 
and high school chemistry. 



Fairmont State Normal School 03 



Physics 2— General Physics. 

Five hours, second semester. Four hours' credit. 
11 :00, M, T, F and a two-hour laboratory period to be 
arranged. A continuation of Physics 1. 



PHYSICAL EDUCATION 

Mr. Colebank Miss Hammond 

Before being assigned to physical education, a stu- 
dent is given a medical and physical examination. Those 
who are not able to take the courses are given special 
attention. 

The student must provide himself with gym suit and 
shoes. 

Members of the various athletic squads may, upon 
recommendation of Mr. Colebank, be permitted to substi- 
tute this athletic training (up to a maximum of four 
semester hours) for any regular course in Physical Edu- 
cation. But this athletic training must be entered upon 
the student's assignment card, and the credit given must 
not bring the total number of hours above eighteen. 



COURSES FOR WOMEN 
Physical Education 1A — Practical Health. 

Two discussion periods (preparation required) and 
two activities periods, first semester. Two hours' 
credit. First section, 9:15, M, T, Th, F; second sec- 
tion 10:00, M, T, W, F. Required of all women stu- 
dents. The course aims to help the student acquire 
the attitudes, habits and knowledge necessary to 
maintaining her highest possible degree of positive 
health. 

Physical Education IB — Practical Health. 

Four hours, second semester. Two hours' credit. 9:15 
M, T, Th, F. A repetition of Physical Education 1A. 



94 Fairmont State Normal School 



Physical Education 3 — Teachers' Primary Physical Edu- 
cation. 

Four hours, second semester. Two hours' credit. 
1:00, M, T, Th. F. Required of all Standard Normal 
iStudents and college curruculum C students specializ- 
ing in primary work. Consists of physical education 
activities suitable for first through fourth grades, 
with methods of teaching the same. 

Physical Education 4 — Teachers' Upper Grade Physical 
Education. 

Four hours, second semester. Two hours' credit. 
8:15, T, W, Th. F. Required of all standard normal 
students and all college curriculum C students spec- 
ializing in upper grade work. Consists of methods 
of teaching folk dances, natural and athletic dancing, 
and other rhythmic activities suitable for fifth 
through ninth grades. 

Physical Education 5 — Teachers' Upper Grade Physical 
Education (games, contests and athletics). 

Four hours, first semester. Two hours' credit. 8:15, 
T, W, Th. F. Required of all standard normal stu- 
dents and all curriculum students specializing in up- 
per grades. 

Physical Education 20 — Natural Dancing. 

Four hours, first semester. Two hours' credit. 1:55, 
M, T, W, Th. 

Physical Education 21 — Stunts and Contests. 

Four hours, second semester. Two hours' credit. 
1:55, M, T, W, Th. 

Physical Education 22 — Folk Dances and Clogs. 

Four hours, first semseter. Two hours' credit. 11:00, 
M, T, Th, F. 

Physical Education 23S — 'Community Recreation. 

Four hours, summer. One hour credit. A course for 
organizers of community recreation. Study of types 
of recreation suitable for home, church, school and 
larger community groups. 



Fairmont State Normal School 95 

COURSES FOR MEN 
Physical Education 2A — Physiology and Hygiene. 

Two hours, first semester. 9:10, M, Th. The facts 
and principles of Anatomy and Physiology are taught 
in so far as they furnish some basis and reason 
for the more practical rules of hygiene. The nature 
and cause of common diseases are discussed together 
with means of prevention. There will be numerous 
class room demonstration's. 

Physical Education 2B — Physiology and Hygiene. 

Two hours, second semester. 9:10, M, Th. A repeti- 
tion of Physical Education 2A. 

Physical Education 5 — Gymnasium. 

Four hours, first semester. Two hours' credit. 10:05, 
M, T, W. F. Setting up exercises, applied gymna- 
sium, jumping exercises, running, walking, marching, 
vaulting; coordinating and corrective work. 

Physical Education 7 — Gymnasium. 

Four hours, second semester. Two hours' credit. 
10:05, M, T, W, F. Continuation of Physical Educa- 
tion 5, with more variety. 

Physical Education 25 — Group Games. 

Four hours, second semester. Two hours' credit. 
1:55, M, T, W, Th. Teaching of games for mass 
athletics, and recreational work; cross-country run- 
ning, indoor track, wrestling, boxing. 



POLITICAL SCIENCE 

Mr. Pence 

Political Science 1 — American Government. 

Three hours, first semester. 2:50, M, W, F. A gen- 
eral survey of the nature of the state and the theory 
of government will be followed by a close study of 
the principal institutions and Agencies of national 
government. A particular effort will be made to 
show how the great agencies of national administra- 
tion actually operate. 



Fairmont State Normal School 



Political (Science 2 — American Government. 

Three hours, second semester. 2:50, M, W, F. This 
course, a continuation of Political Science 1, will deal 
largely with the theory and practice of state, county 
and municipal government. Newer tendencies in the 
various fields of administration and the modern 
party system will also be considered. 

Political Science 10 A — Government of West Virginia. 

Two hours, first semester. 2:&0, T, Th. A course 
in the practice of government as employed in the 
state and local areas of West Virginia. The back- 
grounds of the present institutions, the development 
of administrative agencies of control, and the activi- 
ties of local governing areas will afford the subject 
material of the course. Designed especially for those 
preparing to teach in the elementary schools. 

Political Science 10B — Government of West Virginia. 

Two hours, sec©nd semester. 2:50, T, Th. A repe- 
tition of Political Science 10A. 



PSYCHOLOGY 

Mr. Shreve 

Psychology 1 — General Psychology. 

Four hours, first semester, 9:15, M, T, Th, and F. 
This is a general introductory course treating a 
variety of topics: sensory experience, perception, at- 
tention, images, reflexes, neural theory, instinct, 
habit, memory, emotion, thought and behavior. 

Psychology 2 — Elementary Educational Psychology. 

Same as Education 2. Credited as Education. 

Psychology 20 — The Psychology of Childhood (Omitted 
in 1927-28). 

Four hours, first semester. 9:15, M, T, Th. and F. 
Open to college juniors and seniors. A study of the 
pupil from a genetic point of view. The main topics 
are: the original nature of the child; mental, moral, 
and physical development, and exceptional children. 
Special attention will be given to the adolescent 
period. 



Fairmont State Normal School 97 

Psychology 21 — Advanced Educational Psychology. 

Same as Education 21. Credited as Education. 

Psychology 22 — Social Psychology. 

Four hours, second semester. 1:00, M, T, W, and Th. 
Open to juniors and seniors in the college. This 
course is a study of human nature and conduct from 
the social viewpoint. A study is made of the indi- 
vidual in his social aspects, and of social behavior 
and social control. Prerequisite: Psychology 1 or 2. 



SOCIOLOGY 

Mr. Lively Miss Prichard 

Sociology 1A — Social Relations. 

One hour, first semester. First section, 9:15, W; 
second section, 1:00, W. Required in Normal course. 
This course is a study of social customs and social 
problems. The material of this course is divided into 
two main groups of problems: first, discussion of 
theories and principles of social relations; second, 
studies of practical problems. — Miss Prichard. 

Sociology IB — Social Relations. 

'One hour, second semester. First section, 9:15, W; 
second section, 1:00, W. A repetition of Sociology 
1A. — Mis*s Prichard. 

Socialogy 2 — Rural Sociology. 

Four hours, second semester. 1:30, M, T, W, F. This 
course is a treatment of such rural institutions as the 
church, the home, and the school. It discusses the 
rural, social and economic problems growing out of 
such topics as good roads, farm organizations, social 
life, recreation, isolation, religious life, education, 
with suggestions for their solution. Emphasis is 
placed upon educational agencies. — Mr. Lively. 

Sociology 5Sp — Introduction to Social Evolution. 

Five hours, spring term. One and one-half hours' 
credit. This course takes up in an elementary way 
the various theories of the story of man and the evi- 
dence of his rise to his superior position among ani- 
mal life. — Mr. Lively. 



Fairmont State Normal School 



Sociology 6A — Introduction to Sociology. 

Four hours, first semester. 10:05, M, T, W, F. This 
course is designed to give the student an intelligent 
understanding and a working system of thought about 
society and social origins. The elementary phases 
of the development of society, its institutions and 
working conditions are studied. Social control and 
social progress and the general relations of society 
to standards of authority. — Mr. Lively. 



Sociology 6B — Introduction to Sociology. 

Four hours, second semester. 10:05, M, T, W, F. A 
repetition of Socioldgy 6A — Mr. Lively. 

Sociology 12A— -Human Culture and Social Values. 

Four hours, first semester. 11:00 M, T, Th, F. This 
course attempts to identify and relate in an under- 
standing way the processes of human culture and 
the various factors that operate to establish social 
values. — Mr. Lively. 

Sociology 12B— Human Culture and Social Values. 

Four hours, second semester. 11:00, M, T, Th. F. 
A repetition of Sociology 12A. — Mr. Lively. 

Sociology 20 — Poverty, Dependency and Delinquency. 

Four hours, first semester. 1:00, M, T, Th. F. This 
course takes up the various factors in human society 
that tend to bring about a dependent class. The re- 
lation of our charitable and social institutions to the 
wholesome welfare of all human beings and the in- 
ter-dependence of society are established. Pre- 
requisite: Sociology 6 or Sociology 12. 

Sociology 23 — Social Problems of Labor. 

Four hours, second semester. 9:10, M, T, W, F. 
A study of the standards of living, social outlook and 
general attitude of the laboring class. Prerequisite: 
Sociology 6. — Mr. Lively. 



Fairmont State Normal School 99 



Sociology 24 — Crime and Its Treatment. 

Four hours, first semester. 9:10, M, T, W, F. A 
study of the history and causes of crime, theories of 
punishment, modern prison systems and modern 
methods of dealing with the criminal. Prerequisite: 
'Sociology 6. — Mr. Lively. 

Sociology 25iS — Modern Social Movements and Progress. 

Eight hours, summer, four hours' credit. A careful 
study of the workings of modern social institutions 
in relation to modern progress. Prerequisites: Soci- 
ology 6 and 20. — Mr. Lively. 



EXTENSION DEPARTMENT 

In addition to the two courses of study the Normal 
School supports an Extension Department. This has two 
principal purposes: to assist those who cannot enter 
school, especially teachers, to continue their studies out of 
school; and to help improve educational conditions through- 
out the northern part of West Virginia. A number of 
different kinds of extension activities are carried on, 
among which are the following* 

1. Extension classes are organized among teachers 
and others who may be interested, and conducted by dif- 
ferent members of the faculty. Permission is also grant- 
ed groups of students at a distance from the Normal 
School to form classes with a local leader as instructor. 
Students doing this kind of work are regularly enrolled 
and given credit for the actual amount of work done. 
(For details see page 33). 

2. Persons who are unable to enroll at the school may 
take correspondence work. This work is in charge of dif- 
ferent members of the faculty and students and teachers 
may take it with profit. (See page 34.) 

3. Members of the faculty of the Normal School, as 
far as possible, will accept invitations to assist in educa- 
tional meetings and district institutes, and they are also 
available for commencement addresses. School superin- 
tendents and IBoards of Education are requested to write 
our Extension Department When they need the services 
of our faculty. It is expected that expenses and when- 
ever possible, a small fee be paid for this service. 



100 Fairmont State Normal School 



4. Lecture Courses and entertainments are provided 
by the institution for the towns and school districts with- 
in its territory. These consist of lectures by members of 
the faculty, story-telling hours, readings, and musical 
programs. Plans have also been made to organize and 
direct play festivals. 

5. The school will furnish judges for agricultural 
fairs and other similar exhibitions. 

6. Bulletins of educational interest are occasionally 
published. 

7. Information will be given on matters pertaining 
to the erection of school buildings, the purchasing of 
libraries, and the organization of schools. The Normal 
school, through its faculty, will be glad to serve the pub- 
lic schols in an advisory capacity. 

8. A Teachers' Employment Bureau is maintained 
for the purpose of securing positions for the graduates 
of the Normal School and for other teachers who may 
desire to enroll with the bureau. The institution finds 
that it can render a distinct service to teachers, superin- 
tendents and boards of education, through this bureau. 
All persons interested are requested to make use of it. 

9. Asistance is given in selecting suitable plays for 
high schools. 

The courses listed below and probably a few others 
may be given by correspondence during 1927-28. Tuition 
is at the rate of $5.00 per semester hour. 

Shreve — Ed. 2 Educational Psychology 4 hours 

Ed. 25. Educational Sociology 4 hours 

Hull — Ed. 3. Supervised Study 4 hours 

White — Ed. 6. School Management and School 

Hygiene 4 hours 

Opp — Eng. 3. Supervised Study 4 hours 

Eng. 13. Recent Drama 2 hours 

Lewis — Eng. 8. Advanced Composition 3 hours 

Barnes — Eng. 11 Modern Poetry 2 hours 

Morrow — Eng. 24|S. America Literature from 

1870 to 1900 2 hours 

Eng. 34. Literary Study of the Bible 4 hours 

Eng. 35. New Testament 3 hours 

Stewart — Hist. 21. Roman History 4 hours 

Prichard — Hist. 3. Modern European History.... 4 hours 
Hist. 22. Economic and Social History of 

the United States 4 hours 



Fairmont State Normal School 101 



Ice— Soc. 2. Rural Sociology 4 hours 

Lively — Soc. 6. Introduction to General Sociol- 
ogy 4 hours 

Compton — Home Be. 2. Practical Home Sewing 3 hours 

McCarty — Math. 2. Algebra 4 hours 

Math. 4. Plane Geometry 3 hours 

Math. 5. Solid Geometry 4 hours 

Rogers — Phys. Ed. 1. Physiology and Hygiene.... 2 hours 

The Extension Department publishes a brief circular 
descriptive of its work. Those interested should write for 
the circular. All communications should be addressed to 
M. E. McCarty, Head of the Extension Department. 



PRIVATE MUSIC INSTRUCTION 

Miss Beltzhoover — Piano and Organ 
Miss Mary Price — Voice and Violin 



PIANO AND ORGAN 

The school is equipped with a number of upright 
pianos, which are available for practice, and a Knabe 
grand piano which is used for concert work. Private 
recitals are frequently given by the students, to which 
all members of the school will be admitted. Public re- 
citals which are designed to give the students experience 
in public performance occur several times a year. 

Piano — -The course of study in this department in- 
cludes : 

I. Finger exercises; major and minor scales; scales 
in double thirds; arpeggios in all forms. 

II. Studies by Berens, Bertini, Heller, Hasert. 

III. Sonatinas by Kublau and Clementine; sonatas 
by Haydn, Mozart, Beethoven. 

IV. Compositions by representative composers of all 
periods. 

Pipe Organ — The organ course is intended to provide 
a thorough and complete preparation for the work of a 
church organist and accompanist. 



102 Fairmont State Normal School 

A certain facility at the piano and in sight reading 
is necessary toefore this work is taken up. 

Special studies, pedal studies and hymn playing com- 
prise the preparatory work, followed by the works of 
Rink, Buck, Dunham, Chadwick, Bach, Mendelssohn, Guil- 
mant, Rheingeger, and comprise the groundwork of study 
through the course. 

Tuition — The tuition for a semester payable in ad- 
vance is: 

Lessons per week 
One Two 

Piano $25.00 $50.00 

Organ 36.06 72.00 

Harmony (class of three) 15.00 30.00 

Theory (class of three) 15.00 30.00 

History of Music (class of three) 15.00 30.00 



VOICE 



In addition to the vocal music in the regular Public 
School Music Courses, the normal offers individual in- 
struction in voice. This is not a part of the regular course, 
but suitable credit, as an elective, will be given in the 
course of study. The course consists of the foundation 
of singing, position, breathing, good tone quality, phras- 
ing, accent, rythm, enunciation and articulation. Stu- 
dents will have opportunity to appear in public during 
the year. 

The tuition for a semester payable in advance, ac- 
cording to when the student enters, is: 

Lessons per week 
One Two 

Tuition $25.00 $50.00 



Fairmont State Normal School 103 

VIOLIN 

Students desiring to do so may also take lessons on 
the violin. The director of the music department is a 
graduate of violin from West Virginia University School 
of Music, and has had considerable experience in teaching 
this instrument. All fees are payable in advance per 
semester, according to when the student enters: 

Lessons per week 
One Two 

Tuition $25.00 $50.00 



104 Fairmont State Normal School 

STUDENTS WHO RECEIVED THE A. B. DEGREE 
IN EDUCATION IN 1925-1926. 



NAME HOME ADDRESS COUNTY 

1. Amnions, Besie E FairView -Marion 

2. Ball, Leta M -Maggie _ Mason 

3. Bartlett, Erma Hazel Fairmont Marion 

4. Blocher, Georgia Provance Fairmont Marion 

5. Boatman, Mrs. Leafy R. M.... —..Fairmont ..._ Marion 

6. Boyer, Thelma M Fairmont Marion 

7. Brady, Troy A Mannington Marion 

8. Brock, Mary Emily — — Fairview Marion 

9^ Callaghan, Glenn S Grafton ...._ Taylor 

10. Chenoweth, Kenneth E _ Weston Lewis 

11. Chenoweth, Mrs. Marion Weston Lewis 

12. Colebank, Jasper H .Fairmont ...., -Marion 

13. Cook, Nellie Haywood Harrison 

14. Cox, Frederick Walter Fairmont Marion 

15. Crawford, Annie Laurie Williamson — Mingo 

16. Gillespie, Eleanor Fairmont _ Marion 

17. Goode, Lulu May Fairmont _ Marion 

18. Grose, Mrs. Artha Morgan Fairmont _ Marion 

19. Jenkins, Lula Merrill Terra Alta Preston 

20. Joy, Frank D Fairmont _ Marion 

21. Martin, Charles Herman Fairmont _ Marion 

22. Martin, Chester W_. Shinnston Harrison 

23. Martin, Edgar Blair Shinnston Harrison 

24. Mason, Ora Cecil „ Wadestown Monongalia 

25. Masters, Margaret Mable Littleton Wetzel 

26. McQuain, Adam Orlando Lewis 

27. Park, Chester N Farmington Marion 

28. Peterson, Oda K _ Weston Lewis 

29. Powell, Mary B _ Fairmont — Marion 

30. Rader, Esther Kirkwood _ Nicholas 

31. Rice, Charles Russell _ Hundred Wetzel 

32. Righter, Charles Lowe Shinnston Harrison 

33. Robinson, Virginia E Monongah Marion 

34. Rogers, Cephas Jane Lew Lewis 

35. Rogers, Marion George Jane Lew Lewis 

36. Shaffer, Mrs. Vertie M Fairmont Marion 

37. SnodgTass, John F Mannington Marion 

38. Squires, Fay Fairmont _ Marion 

39. Stephenson, Opal E Weston _ Lewis 

40. Taylor, Mrs. Stella B _ Elkins Randolph 

41. Weigand, Agnes B „ -Millwood -Jackson 

42. Young, Nora Edith Moundsville Marshall 



Fairmont State Normal School 105 

STANDARD NORMAL GRADUATES 
1925-1926 



NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY 

1 .Azelvandre, Eleanor Louise 414 Spring Ave Harrison 

Clarksburg 

2. Baker, Edythe Blanche R.F.D. No. 6 Marion 

Fairmont 

3. Baker, Eva May 510 Pittsburgh Ave...Marion 

Fairmont 

4. Berry, Meryl Evelyn _R. F. D. No. 3 Marion 

Fairmont 

5. Bright, Eleanor Virginia 210 John St., Elkins.. Randolph 

6. Church, Archie - Hundred -Wetzel 

7. Clayton, Mabel Baxter —Marion 

8. Clayton, Olive Baxter — Marion 

9. Clelland, Willa Irene 812 Locust Ave Marion 

Fairmont 

10. Click, Mary Ravenswood Jackson 

11. Cobb, Bonnie Bell Mercers Bottom Mason 

12. Conaway, Mrs. Zella Locust Ave Marion 

Fairmont 

13. Cubbon, Claude Hastings Lumberport Harrison 

14. Currence, Lillian Pearle Elkins Randolph 

15. Davis, Hattie R.F.D. No. 1..— Marion 

Hammond 

16. Deason, Mrs. Hazel Brown Fairmont Marion 

17. DeMoss, Ada Esta Grafton _ Taylor 

18. Dicken, Mary Margaret Pennsylvania Ave Marion 

Fairmont 

19. Dickinson, Mary Castola Cheat Haven -Fayette 

Pennsylvania 

20. Dotson, Calora Frances _210 Highland Ave Marion 

Fairmont 

21. Dotson, Mrs. Mary Elizabeth....210 Highland Ave Marion 

Fairmont 

22. Dudley, Esther Harobin 224 California Ave.... Hancock 

Chester 

23. Eastman, Lyle Harold — Mannington Marion 

24. Findley, Pauline 659 Locust Ave Harrison 

Clarksburg 

25. Finley, Veva 917 West Boyd St Taylor 

Grafton 

26. Forney, Clara Louise 310 Dancer Ave Marion 

Mannington 

27. Frischon, Ruth Agatha 707 Virginia Ave Marion 

Fairmont 

28. Frum, Mabel _ 503 State St. Marion 

Fairmont 

29. Funt, Martha M 312 Walnut Ave Marion 

Fairmont 

30. Gardner, Emma Esther Cowen Webster 

31. Goff, Mildred Rose ...._ Cowen Webster 

32. Hall, Edith Murl _ _ 713 Pittsburgh Ave... Marion 

Fairmont 

33. Hanway, Virginia Riley 458 Maple Ave Taylor 

Grafton 

34. Harden, Florence Evelyn 814 Emerson St -Marion 

Fairmont 



106 Fairmont State Normal School 



NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY 

35. Hawkins, Lorraine Sarah 601 Seventh St Marion 

Fairmont 

36. Hawkins, Virginia Adelaide.... 700 Church St Marion 

Fairmont 

37. Heinzman, Blanche L. New Martinsville Wetzel 

38. Hennen, Enid Lala Cameron -Marshall 

39. Hickman, Beatrice Ripley Jackson 

40. Himmelrick, Essie Burton Wetzel 

41. Hines, Genevieve Omdoff Webster 

42. Hinkle, Walton H. -....405 Spring St. Marion 

Fairmont 

43. Hudkins, Lucile Lenore Gassaway Braxton 

44. Hunter, Mabel 29 4th Ave -Marion 

Mannington 

45. Ice, Lona Grace R. F. D. No. 6 Marion 

Mannington 

46. Jenkins, Martha Jean 1112 Alexander PI Marion 

Fairmont 

47. Joyce, Irene Four States — Marion 

48. Kessell, Faith _ -Ripley _ -Jackson 

49. Kimble, Gladys Fay .....Littleton Wetzel 

50. Kline, Elizabeth Louise 813 Coleman Ave. Marion 

Fairmont 

51. Kunst, Gladys Irene 15 W. Wilfort St. Taylor 

Grtifton 
152. Laughlin, Pauline ...,. Metz ..._ Marion 

53. Linger, Ernestine Roanoke Lewis 

54. Dinger, Delia Pearl 1130 Bryant St Marion 

Fairmont 

55. Linger, Mona Corrinne 1130 Bryant St Marion 

Fairmont 

56. Love, Velma Ruth 1207 E. Main St Harrison 

Clarksburg 

67. Lucas, Irene Enterprise Harrison 

58. Martin, Orval Clovis French Creek — Upshur 

69. Matthews, Emma Theresa Cameron Marshall 

60. Mayne, Alvaretta _ Enterprise _ Harrison 

61. McDowell, Dorothy 19 Oakwood Road Marion 

Fairmont 

62. Mcintosh, Ralph H -...Rayenswood k Jackson 

63. McKinley, Virginia Barbara....232 Maple Ave Harrison 

Clarksburg 

64. McMillen, Edna Masontown Preston 

65. McWhorter, Marian Emma Greenbrier Road Marion 

Fairmont 

66. Merrill, Mary Martha -Rivesville Marion 

67. Miller, Lutie Velva Littleton _ Wetzel 

68. Moore, Mary Madeline 23 Market St. -....Marion 

Mannington 

69. Morgan, Gertrude Beryl 510 Pittsburgh Ave. -Marion 

Fairmont 

70. Morgan, Isabel Eliza __913 Union Bk. Bldg— Harrison 

Clarksburg 

71. Morgan, Naomi Frances Fairmont Marion 

72. Morgan, Willa Virginia Rivesville Marion 

73. Morris, Stazie Glover Gap Marion 

74. Morrow, Pauline Estelle 619 Walnut Ave Marion 

Fairmont 

75. Musgrove, Doris Opal 603 Morgant'n Ave Marion 

Fairmont 

76. Musser, Erma Mildred 410 Spring Ave. Harrison 

Clarksburg 



Fairmont State Normal School 107 



NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY 

77. Nuzum, Pauline Oleta 714 15th St Marion 

Fairmont 

78. Perrine, Audree Gail Cowen Webster 

79. Plotts, Wilma Estella Chester Hancock 

80. Poling, Bertha 403 Bellview Ave Marion 

Fairmont 

81. Powell, Cecyle Marjorie Blacksville ....Monongalia 

82. Reitz, Margaret Lucaetia 28 High St., Elk ins.. Randolph 

83. Riggs, Eva M „ Cameron Marshall 

84. Rohrbough, Myrl Geraldine..._.151 Pike St., Weston.. Lewis 

85. Romiino, Mary Louise 204 Pennsylv'a Ave...Marion 

Fairmont 

86. Rowley, Joseph V Shinnston Harrison 

87. Rush, William Everett Earnshaw Wetzel 

88." Satterfield, Martha Pierpont.... Fairmont Marion 

89. Scalise, Josephine Box 7, Fairmont. Marion 

90. Sloan, Robert C _ 408 Monroe St Marion 

Fairmont 

91. Smith, Lois Newburg Preston 

92. Smith, R. Pearl Rt. No. 8, Fairmont.. Marion 

93. Snider, Otis Ralph Watson ...* Marion 

94. Snodgrass, Gladys Daphne Smithfield _ Wetzel 

95. Sole, Ruth ...._ _ 307 Quincy St Marion 

Fairmont 

96. Springer, Mary R. F. D. No. 8 Marion 

Fairmont 

97. Stalnaker, Pearl Weston Lewis 

98. Stewart, Vera Friendly Tyler 

99. Tennant, Sallie Elizabeth Barrack ville Marion 

100. Tetrick, Vera Dome Enterprise Harrison 

101. Thomas, Mary Eliza ...._ ^...209 Watson Ave. ...... Marion 

Fairmont 

102. Thompson, Alice Cornelia. 800 Gaston Ave Marion 

Fairmont 

103. Thompson, Irene _ _ MiddJebourne Tyler 

104. Thurber, Ethel M _ 524 Market St. Ohio 

Wheeling 

105. TuTley, George H 304 Chicago St. Marion 

Fadrmont 

106. Wagner, Faye F „ Ravenswood Jackson 

107. Watkins, Wihna Clare Shinnston Harrison 

108. Weber, Helen Beatrice Grant Town Marion 

109. West, Gladys Leola Lost Creek Harrison 

110. Whitaker, Mary Esther Bell Center Ohio 

111. Willis, Mildred — ...Lumberport ..._ Harrison 

112. Wimer, Floda Gertrude ...^ Jane Lew -Lewis 

113. Wright, Hilda _Newburg ...._ Preston 

114. Yeager, Edna 117 Howard St Marion 

Mannfington 
9 MEN 105 WOMEN. 



108 



Fairmont State Normal School 



ENROLLMENT 1926-1927 
SPECIAL STUDENTS 



NAME 



POST OFFICE 



1st. 
S.S. Sem. 



Ball, Leta Maggie * 

Bayle, Carrie Lucile Demascus, Ohio.... 

Beltzhoover, Kathryn....Shepherdstown .... * 

Bridges, Rhoda .Barrackville 

Leonard, Louise -Fairmont * 

Mitchell, Rose Fairmont 

Cook, Thomas E Fairmont * 

Harris, Samuel Fairmont 

Lambert, Robert 

Stanley _ Fairmont * 

Milam, Otis JBaraackville * * 

Wilson, W. A Fairmont * 



2nd. 
Sem. SPCOUNTY 

* Mason 

* Columbiana 

* Jefferson ... 

* Marion 

* Marion 

* Marion 

* Marion 

* Marion 

Marion 

* Marion 

* Marion 



Fairmont State Normal School 



109 



ENROLLMENT 1926-1927 
COLLEGE SENIORS 



POST OFFICE POST OFFICE COUNTY 



1st. 2nd. 
S.S. Sem. Sem. SP 



Bartlett, Christine Shinnston Harrison * 

Boatman, Leafy R.M...Fairmont Marion * 

Boggess, Pauline — Fairmont Marion 

Boyers, Naomi Fairmont Marion * 

Bramlett, Pearl LaircLShinnston Marion * 

Chenoweth, Mary M Weston Lewis * 

Collins, Willa Fairmont Marion * 

Crane, Beatrice -Maud _ Wetzel * 



..Marion 
..Marion 



...Marion * 

...Marion 



Cunningham, R. E Fairmont . 

Currey, Mildred L Fairmont . 

Currey, Mrs. Virginia 

W -Fairmont . 

DeVoe, Anna Jane Fairmont . 

Everhart, Louise Elkins —...Randolph .... 

Ferguson, Ruth . — .Fairmont Marion * 

Fisher, Mrs. Rhea Shinnston Harrison 

Funt, Martha M — Faiirmont Marion 

Furbee, Sarah L. Mannington Marion * 

Gibbons, Teresa New Martinsv'le..Wetzel * 

Hall, Gertrude Fairmont Marion * 

Haymond, Isabel -Fleming, Ky. 

Ice, Edith Fairmont Marion * 

Johnson, Ruth Fairmont Marion * 

Johnston, Emily Fairmont Marion 

LaFollette, Mary Fairmont Marion * 

Laird, Beulah V Enterprise Harrison * 

Laughlin, Neva C -.Fairmont Marion * 

Leach, Mrs. Emma H...Grafton -Taylor * 

Martin, Helen Enterprise Harrison 

Musgrave, Florence Wheeling Ohio * 

Neill, Virginia Cairo -Ritchie * 

Ney, Florence Fairmont Marion ........ 

Poling, Vivien Aileen_Fairmont Marion ......... 

Potter, Iona Fairmont Marion 

Potter, Ruth Fairmont Marion 

Priest, Helen Franklin Pendleton — * 

Rader, Esther Summersville Nicholas * 

Randall, Estelle Shinnston ..._ Harrison * 

Reed, Margaret Fairmont Marion 

Robey, Frances Fairmont Marion * 

Robey, Leila -Fairmont Marion 



110 



Fairmont State Normal School 



NAME 



1st. 2nd. 
POST OFFICE COUNTY S.S. Sem. Sem. SP 



Robinson, Virginia Monongah Marion 

Rose, Ethel Heaters Braxton ... 

Rosencrance, NelMe — Beverly — Randolph . 

Schroder, Clara C. A...Moundsville Marshall ... 

Scott, Christine Fairmont Marion 

Smith, Margaret M Fairmont Marion 

Snedegar, Delpha .Marlinton — Pocahontas 

Spencer, Effie B Parkersburg Wood 

Stalnaker, Thelma Chrichton Greenbrier 

Stalnaker, Camille Elkins Randolph . 

Stephenson, Elizabeth — Gdlboa Nicholas ... 

Turkovich, Mary Monongah . Marion ..... 

Vincent, Mae Poe Fairmont Marion 

Walls, Ruth Pisgah -Preston 

Watson, Elinor B Fairmont ..... .Marion 

White, Grace Grafton — Taylor 

Windsor, Letha M -Fairmont — Marion 

Wyckoff, Zeppa — Falirmont — Marion 

Young, Nora Mounds ville Marshall .... 



Allman, Clarence B Glen Easton Marshall 

Balderson, Walter Fairmont — Marion 

Bartell, Joseph A Fairmont — Marion 

Blake, Charles L. Moundsville Marshall .... 

Bramlett, James M. Shinnston Harrison .... 

Brock, Clarence A Fairmont . Marion 

Brown, Wayman Lumberport Harrison 

Burke, Alex -Monongah . Marion 

Callaghan, Glenn S Grafton Taylor 

Cole, Dale Farmington Marion 

Cole, John W _ .Adamston Harrison .... 

Cornwell, Lorain S -Kasson Preston 

Dawson, Paul B Fairmont Marion 

Deveny, Thomas A. Fairmont Marion 

Eastman, Lyle H Mannington Marion 

Elder, Clemma Irvin Belington Barbour .... 

Fur bee, Leonard .....Folsom Wetzel 

Grimes, George Fairmont Marion 

Gumm, Boyce L Fairmont Marion 

Hill, Pierre F Fairmont .Marion ...... 

Hull, John Tilden Weston Lewis 

Koon, Charles F Fairmont Marion 

Kuhn, E. G ..Farmington Marion 

Linger, Mandeville S...Fairmont Marion 

Linger, Wade —Weston Lewis 

Mason, Ora Cecil Wadestown Monongalia 



Fairmont State Normal School 111 



1st. 2nd. 

NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S.S. Sem. Sem. SP 

Mick, J. E _ Lumberport Harrison * * * 

Moosey, George A Monongah Marion * * * 

Neely, Alfred V Fairmont .Marion * 

O'Donnell, Earle V „Parkersburg Wood • • * 

Park, Chester M Farmiington ...Marion * 

Rentage, Russell Gassaway — Braxton .... * 

Rice, Charles R. ...- Hundred Wetzel * 

Ridenour, Roscoe S Grafton — Taylor * * • 

Rider, P. Melford Rivesville .Marion * * * 

Robinson, Fred D Grafton .Harrison • * • 

Rohrbough. Henry Camden — Lewis • 

Rogers, Fred Independence Preston • • 

Sarten, O. R. . Lumberport Harrison • • • • 

Sharps, A. B. Lumberport Harrison * 

Skinner M. P Gassaway Braxton * 

Sloan, Robert C Fairmont Marion * * * 

Small, Carlyle Fairmont Marion * * 

Snodgrass, Dale Mannington Marion * * 

Stabiaker, W. Crichton Greenbrier > * * 

Whoolery, Kenneth — Fairmont Marion * 

Woodford, O. J Philippi Barbour * * 

Yoho, Audrey Verl Silver Hill Wetzel * * 



112 



Fairmont State Normal School 



ENROLLMENT 1926-1927 
COLLEGE JUNIORS 



NAME 



POST OFFICE COUNTY 



S.S. Sem. Sem. SP 
1st. 2nd. 



Akins, Elizabeth Fairmont Marion 

Backus, Goldie M Parkersburg Wood 

Baker, Edythe Fairmont Marion 

Baker, Eva Mae Fairmont Marion 

Baker, Hilda V Glendale -Marshall 

Banfield, Ruth Lillian..Fairmont Marion 

Barns, Caroline W. .Fairmont Marion 

Bartlett, Lucille N Fairmont Marion 

Batson, Anna Fairmont Marion 

Bobbitt, Mabel H. Cowen -Webster 

Bruffey, Georgia Roanoke Lewis 

Burge, Mabel Mae Parkersburg Wood 

Byer, Eunice — .Fairmont ..._ Marion 

Carpenter, Gene E -..Fairmont . — Marion ., 

Clayton, Mabel Baxter Marion 

Clayton, Willard Fairmont Marion 

Clelland, Irene Fairmont Marion 

Conaway, Marzella — Grafton Taylor 

Conner, Mary McMechen .Marshall 

Cowan, Ira M Fairmont Marion 

Davis, Bertba Bice Shinnston Harrison 

Davis, Mary Kathleen-Fairmont Marion 

Davis, Mildred Baxter Marion 

Dice, Bonnie Franklin -Pendleton 

Dotson, Calora F Fairmont Marion 

Dotson, Mary E -Fairmont Marion 

Dunnington, Ruth V Fairmont Marion 

Fisher, Helen F. Flatwoods ...- -Braxton ..... 

Forney, Clara Louise... .Mannington Marion 

Frazjer, Mary Fairmont Marion 

Frum, Alice Louise Shinnston Harrison 

Funk, Delia L Tunnelton Preston , 

Furbee, Lillian Folsom Wetzel 

Gall, Elsie May -Philippl Barbour .... 

Gibson, Christine Post-.Masontown Preston 

Gibson, Ha Kathryn Grafton Taylor 

Gorman, Esther Marie.-Morgantown Monongalia 

Grapes, Beatrice L. Hepzibah Harrison .... 

Hall, Edith Murl Fairmont Marion 

Hall, Fannye K Fairmont Marion 

Haught, Stella —Fairview Marion 



Fairmont State Normal School 113 



1st. 2nd. 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S.S. Sem. Sem. SP 

Harden, Florence E .Fairmont Marion * 

Hawkins, Virginia R Fairmont Marion * 

Henderson, Lula H Rivesville Marion * 

Hewitt, Esta C Shinnston Harrison * 

Hibbs, Sarah Fairmont Marion * 

Hodges, Mildred Reed-Fairmont Marion * 

Holt, Edith C Fairmont Marion * 

Hoover, Myra Fairmont Marion * * 

Hudkins, Lucile L Gassaway Braxton * * 

Huey, Dollie Lee Mannington Marion * 

Huey, Thelma Jean Mannington Marion * 

Hughes, Madeline Fairmont Marion * * * 

Hull, Mary A Fairmont Marion * * * 

Hunter, Mabel Mannington Marion * 

Hunsaker, Mildred E...Fairmont Marion * 

Hunsaker, Alma Fairmont Marion * 

Ice, Lona Grace — Mannington Marion * 

Inghram, Elizabeth Fairview .....Marion 

Irons, Vallie Colfax Marion * 

Jack, Florence N Fairmont Marion * * 

Keener, Opal L Fairmont ..._ Marion * 

Kennedy, Eva Helen.... Hundred Wetzel * 

Kergan, Ada Skiles Sabraton Monongalia * * 

Kinney, Maybelle Parkersburg Wood * 

Kline, Elizabeth L -Fairmont Marion * 

Knight, Elizabeth Fairmont Marion * * 

Koon, Mabel Watson —Marion * 

Lavely, Mary Evelyn ..Signal, Ohio * 

Leppert, Louise Ravenswood Jackson * 

Lloyd, Ella Mae_ Fairmont Marion * 

Linger, Lulu Weston Lewis r * 

Lucas, Irene -..Enterprise Harrison * * * 

Martin, Josephine Enterprise Harrison * * * 

Maust, Grace Irene Clifton Mills Preston * 

Maxwell, Geneva Shinnston Harrison * 

McCarty, Pearl Sands..Fairmont Marion * * 

McClure, Mildred -Morgantown Monongalia * 

McDonald, Lucile Jane Lew -Harrison * 

McNeely, Mary Fairmont Marion * 

Merrifield, Maude V Fairmont Marion * 

Miller, Mary Virginia.-Grafton ...._ -Taylor * * 

Morris, Hazel V -Kingwood Preston * 

Morris, Maude B Harrisville Tyler * 

Nutter, Mary Strum Shinnston Harrison * 

Nuzum, Hazel Rozella.. Fairmont Marion * 

Nuzum, Pauline Oleta.. Fairmont Marion * * 



114 Fairmont State Normal School 



1st. 2nd. 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S.S. Sem. Sem. SP 

Oster, Pearl -Keyser Mineral * 

Parrish, Coralee C Lumberport Harrison * 

Parrish, Margaret C Fairmont Marion * 

Parsons, Dorothy Mannington Marion * * 

Patton, Mrs. Cath. H...Shinnston Harrison * 

Petres, Anna Mannington Marion * 

Post, Mary Elizabeth.... Jane Lew ..Lewis * 

Powell, Gladys Fairmont Marion * 

Price, Mary Parsons -Tucker * 

Prickett, Irene T Fairmont uoijbj^ * 

Rector, Winnie — Shinnston Harrison * 

Redfox, Mildred Clarksburg Harrison * * 

Reed, Ethel Virginia ... Boothsville Marion * 

Reed, Pauline M Fairmont Marion * * 

Renner, Ella Hundred Wetzel * 

Robinson, Margaret H...Monongah Marion 

Rushford, Charlotte New Martinsv'le.. Wetzel * 

Russell, Charlotte M._ Fairmont Marion * 

Ryan, Helen Fairmont Marion * 

Scott, Pearl L Fairmont Marion * * 

Scranage, Mary R. -Grafton Taylor * 

Shough, Edna Lee Hundred Wetzel • * 

Smith, Dawn Fairmont Marion * 

Smyth, Mildred Lee Morgantown Monongalia * 

Snider, Mary Ruth Mannington Marion * 

Starkey, Edna — Mannington Marion * 

Stephenson, Sara Ann.. Weston -Lewis _ * 

Stewart, Bernice A Fairmont Marion • 

Stillings, Marie Smithfield Wetzel * * • 

Straight, Hazel V # Fairmont Marion * 

Summers, Estella Fairmont Marion * 

Thobois, Olive A Mannington Marion * * 

Thompson, Alice Fairmont Marion * * 

Thompson, Lucretia ....Shinnston Harrison * 

Thome, Neva F Fairmont Marion * 

Thrasher, Thelma A Wilsonburg Harrison * 

Tracewell, Leona Parkersburg Wood * 

Tulin, Gladys May Worthington Marion * * 

Van Gilder, Pearl Fairmont Marion * 

Wilfong, Mary Edna....Dunmore Pocahontas 

Wilhelm, Margaret Rachel Marion * * 

Wilderman, Ruth -Fairmont Marion * * 

Wilkinson, Florence H... Grafton -Taylor * 

Williamson, Lela Fairmont Marion * * 

Wilson, Clara — Fairmont Marion * * 

Wiseman, Shelagh B Monongah Marion * * 



Fairmont State Normal School 



115 



name 



POST OFFICE COUNTY 



1st. 2nd. 
S.S. Sem. Sem. SP 



Addis, Georgia N Fairmont Marion 

Amnions, Glen Fairview -Marion 

Atha, Lester C Farmington Marion 

Barbers, George F Fairmont Marion 

Brown, Hugh W Lumberport Harrison 

Gale, George Claude. ..Terra Alta Preston * 

Callahan, John Ralph.. Fairmont Marion 

Connell, Thomas J Fairmont Marion 

Criss, Jennings W Watson Marion * 

Cubbon, Kenneth E Shinnston Harrison 

Derrow, Roy Moundsville Marshal * 

Hale, Edward Everett- Fairmont Marion * 

Harbert, Richard E Lumberport Harrison * 

Hefner, Paul Grafton Taylor 

Henderson, Earl Ravenswood Jackson * 

Henry, John Herbert — Grafton Taylor 

Henry, Percy Fairmont Marion 

Hickman, Clyde T Grafton ...._ Taylor 

Hinkle, Walton H Fairmont Marion 

Holt, Andrew E Weston JL^wis * 

Holt, Charles William.. Weston Lewis * 

Jones, Robert Harold-Fairmont „ Marion * 

Little, Charles Leon Bridgeport Taylor * 

Martin, Gilbert Watson Marion 

Martin, Hugh Monongah Marion * 

Michael, Horace Fairview Marion 

Michael, Carroll -Barrackville Marion 

Michie, Arthur Fairmont Marion 

Millan, Glen Leland....Worthington Marion 

Miller, E. O Farmington Marion 

Miller, Samuel Owen — Fairmont Marion * 

Moore, L_ E — Mannington Marion 

Morrison, Lewis F. Morgantown Monongalia * 

Parker, John Rivesville Marion 

Offner, Edward Fairmont Marion 

Sample, Lloyd E. Jr Fairmont Marion * 

Samples, William Grafton Taylor 

Scott, Walter R Smithfield Wetzel 

Smith, Rex Fairmont Marion * 

Snider, Otis Ralph Watson Marion 

Stealy, Robert Alton.... Fairmont Marion 

Welch, Thomas Moundsville Marshall * 

White, Simon L Hundred Wetzel * 

Wolfe, Dorwin Jasper.. Moatsville Barbour .... 

Wilson, Orris R Kingwood Preston 

Hill, Caton Nelson Columbus, Ghio.... 



116 Fairmont State Normal School 



COLLEGE SOPHOMORES 



1st. 2nd. 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S.S. Sem. Sem. SP 

Ahem, Lucille Fairmont .Marion * * 

Boggess, Helen Louise..Fairmont Marion * 

Brown, Mildred M Lumberport Harrison * 

Byers, E. Louise Grafton Taylor * 

Cannell, Allene Fairmont Marion * * 

Clayton, Corinne Baxter Marion * * 

Coffman, Alice G Mannington Marion * * 

Eisele, Virginia M Fairmont -Marion * 

Goldin, Mayme W Parkersburg Wood * * 

Hagan, Martha C Fairmont Marion * * 

Hamilton, Freda V Hundred Wetzel ..: * 

Harr, Edith Fairmont Marion * * 

Hawley, Catherine Fairmont Marion * 

Hilberry, Doris G Fairmont Marion * * 

Hilkey, Geneva Grafton Taylor * * 

Kite, Helen Fairmont Marion * * 

Hughes, Faythe P -Farmington Marion * * 

Hughes, Susan Enterprise Harrison * 

Kinney, Blanche Ida May Marion * * 

Kinney, Grace Ida May Marion * * 

Lantz, Oral Pearle Jacksonburg Wetzel * 

Larimore, Virginia New Martinsv'le Wetzel * 

Lehmfen, Josephine Fairmont ..Marion * 

Lough, Leanore Fairmont Marion * * 

Marshall, Margaret ....Fairmont Marion * * 

McKinney, Nola Fairmont Marion * 

Michael, Grace Fairmont Marion * 

Miller, Margaret L Fairmont Marion * * 

Nutter, Anita May Enterprise Harrison * * 

Nutter, Olga Fairview ..Marion * * 

Nutter, Virginia Lee.. ..Enterprise -Harrison * * 

Pitzer, Dove Fairview Marion * * 

Riggs, Evalyn Fairmont Marion * * 

Robinson, Gladys Grafton Taylor _ * 

Rowland, Dorothy -Grafton Taylor _ * 

Smith, Irene -Weston .Lewis * 

Snider, Fern Fairmont Marion * * 

Stewart, Jessie Cleo Rachel Marion * * 

Tabler, Elizabeth Mannington Marion * * 

Wolfe, Mary Bassel Mt. Clare Harrison * 

Baker, Lee F Rivesville Marion * 

Barker, Carl Shinnston ...Harrison * * 



Fairmont State Normal School 117 



1st. 2nd. 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S.S. Sem. Sem. SP 

Bice, Evan ..._ Enterprise Harrison * 

Boyers, William F. Fairmont Marion * * 

Brown, Joseph Fairmont Marion * 

Carter, Allen Fairmont Marion * * 

Davis, Scott Homer Grafton Taylor _ * * 

Davisson, Paul Fairmont ..._ Marion * * 



Dexter, Benton G Fairmont Marion * 

Dickerson, Albert S. ....Fairmont Marion * 

Dillaman, Roy Smithfield Marion 

Eddy, John Esta Fairmont Marion * * 

Deveny, John Fairmont Marion * 

Gump, John Mannington Marion * * 

HalL Lawrence Grafton Taylor * * 

Hamilton, Ralph E Hundred Wetzel * 

Harr, H. Ingram Fairmont Marion * 

Harr, Lewis FrederickFairmont Marion * * 

Hawkins, Richard Fairmont Marion * * 

Henderson, Thomas L...Fairmont Marion * * 

Houck, Frederick E -Fairmont Marion * * 

Jarrett, Charles Fairmont Marion * * 

Kerr, George Giffin Fairmont Marion * * 

Kimble, James -Fairmont Marion * * 

Kisner, John Hupp Fairmont Marion * 

Losh, Lawrence Grafton Taylor * * 

Lowe, Scott C Fairmont Marion * * * 

McDade, Charles Grafton Taylor * * 

McDonald, Sam Monongah Marion * * 

McQuail, John Wadestown .Monongalia * 

Michael, E. Paul Rachel Marion * * 

Nuzum, Charles R Lumberport Harrison * * 

Nuzum, Walton Colfax — Marion * * 

Offner, Edward Fairmont Marion * 

Parrish, Marvin Fairview Marion * * 

Powell, Orven Mannington Marion * 

Prickett, C. F Fairmont Marion * 

Ridgeway, Dale Barrackville Marion * * 

Robey, Howrad Mannington Marion * 

Sipp, Joseph Worthington Marion » * 

Squires, Delbert W Fairmont Marion * 

Stewart, James Enterprise .Harrison * 

Straight, Paul Mannington Marion * * 

Vennari, Alexander . ..Lumberpoitt Marion * * 

White, R. Ryland Fairmont T^ Marion * * 

Wilson Orris Raymond-Fairmont Marion * * 

Zuspan, Carl Fairmont Marion * 



118 



Fairmont State Normal School 



COLLEGE FRESHMEN 



NAME 



POST OFFICE COUNTY 



1st. 2nd. 
S.S. Sera. Sera. SP 



Baker, Dorothy Grafton .Taylor 

Bartlett, Thelma Fairmont Marion * 

Binns, Pauline Fairmont Marion 

Brobst, Catherine Fairmont Marion 

Brooks, Virginia Fairmont .. Marion 

Christopher, Ruby Fairmont Marion 

Clelland, Edith Watson Marion 

Culbertson, Esther — Fairmont Marion 

Eddy, Ruth Fairmont Marion 

Fisher, Edna -Fairmont Marion 

Fleming, Mary F Fairmont Marion 

Fletcher, Louise Fairmont Marion 

Ford, Evalena Fairmont Marion 

Gleason, Margaret M...Moundsville Marshall 

Haines, Mrs. Pauline....Fairmont ...Marion 

Hall, Vetrice EleanoreRachel —Marion 

Harbison, Mary E Mannington -Marion 

Harrison, Mary Farmington Marion 

Hawkins, Margaret L # .. Fairmont ..Marion 

Heskitt, Elizabeth B Worthington Marion 

Hilberry, Irene L Kingmont Marion 

Holdren, Helen J -Fairmont Marion 

Hull, Anna Lobelia Pocahontas * 

Ice, Dorothy ...Enterprise ...- -Marion 

Irwin, Sara Belle Meyersdale, Pa, Somerset 

Jones, Elizabeth M Fairmont Marion 

LaFollette, Amy Fairmont Marion * 

Layman, Ellen Mae Fairmont ...«. Marion • 

Layman, Mrs. Mildred-Fairmont ...<. Marion 

Long, Nancy Mannington Marion 

McCray, Jane Mannington Marion 

McCray, Kathleen Fairmont Marion 

Miller, Kathryn E Grafton Taylor 

Nicodemus, Anna E Fairmont Marion 

Miller, Jane Fairmont Marion * 

Osgood, Virginia Fairmont Marion 

Parrish, Arietta -Fairmont Marion 

Parrish, Margaret E. -Mannington -Marion 

Pollock, Maude Fairmont Marion 

Rock, Alice Fairmont Marion 

Ritchie, May Franklin -Pendleton .... 

Robinson, Gladys Grafton Taylor 

Samples, Virginia Grafton -..Taylor 



Fairmont State Normal School 



119 



NAME 



POST OFFICE COUNTY 



1st. 2nd. 
S.S. Sem. Sem. SP 



Smith, Agnes Clifford-Fairmont Marion 

Springer, Sara Fairmont Marion 

Staggers, Mary Ellen.. ..Fairmont Marion 

Sturm, Geraldine Shinnston Harrison * 

Sturm, Mary Fairview Marion 

Tennant, Tensel Barrackville Marion * 

Thomas, Mary Loui3e..Grafton -..Taylor 

Tropea, Marguerite Monongah Marion 

Turner, Ruth E. ..._ Grafton Taylor 

Watson, Frances E -Fairmont Marion 

Harvey, Ruby L. Lumberport Harrison 



Adams, John -Middlebourne -Tyler * 

Adkins, Z. Carlyle Grafton Taylor * 

Anwyll, Vincent T Fairmont Marion 

Baker, Lee Rivesville Marion * 

Barcus, Harold Fairmont Marion 

Barr, Glen Otho Glover Gap Marion 

Bock, H. Percell Shinnston Harrison 

Boggess, Sidney Shinnston Harrison 

Boord, Lovell Fairmont Marion 

Burnett, Paul Farmington Marion 

Coleman, James H Farmington ...Marion 

Conner, William Fairmont Marion 

Dickerson, Albert Fairmont Marion * 

Eddy, Ralph —Fairmont Marion 

Engle, Holland E -Fairmont Marion 

Frum, Allison -Fairmont Marion 

Ford, Glen Morris Mannington Marion 

Glover, Warner A Fairmont Marion 

Griffith, Roy W Fairmont Marion 

Haught, Howard Mannington Marion 

Hawkins, Basil Fairmont Marion 

Hawkins, Fleming Shinnston Harrison 

Hickman, Bard Grafton -Taylor 

Huffman, James C. Mannington Marion • 

Kramer, Charles Fairmont Marion 

Lambert, John Max Shinnston Harrison 

Linger, Kent -Fairmont Marion 

McLane, William A—West Union Doddridge .. 

McDonald, Sam -Monongah Marion • 

Meredith, Carl -Fairmont Marion 

Meredith, William L. ...Fairmont Marion 

McClung, Nicholas S...Elizabeth Wirt 

Miller, Robert L Fairmont Marion * 

Minter, John F. Clarksburg Harrison 



120 Fairmont State Normal School 



1st. 2nd. 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S.S. Sem. Sem. SP 



Mitchell, Charles Fairmont Marion 

Mitchell, John M Fairmont .Marion 

Moore, Clarence Fairmont Marion 

Moroose, Tucker R Fairmont — Marion 

Morgan, Wayne Fairmont Marion 



Mansfield, Richard Fairmont — Marion 

Nicodemus, Charles R...Fairmont .Marion 

Nutter, Odell — Fairview Marion 

O'Neal, Cleon D -Pullman Ritchie 

Powell, Robert K. Fairmont Marion 

Prim, Senior Fairmont Marion 

Randall, Harry -Fairmont Marion 

Randall, Charles Shinnston Harrison 

Reeves, John Fairmont Marion 

Reip, Herman Frametown Braxton 

Riggs, George Fairmont Marion 

Ronay, Alex Fairmont .Marion 

Scholl, George Clarksburg -Harrison 

Shore, Edwin -Fairmont Marion 

Shurtleff, Richard E...Fairmont Marion f. 

Simpson, Richard E -Fairmont Marion 

Smith, Root Streett Farmington Marion 

Squires, John .Enterprise Marion 

Tennant, Paul D -Shinnston ..Harrison 

Thomas, Beryl Fairmont Marion 

Thralls, Richard . Fairmont Marion 

Thobois, Raymond Farmington Marion * 

Tobis, James W Mannington Marion * 

Tork, Patrick Fairmont — Marion 

Wayne, Francis Fairmont Marion 

Wilson, Kermit -HarTisville Ritchie 

Yost, Argyle -Farmington Marion 

Hamilton, F. Max -Mannington Marion . * 

Hayhurst, Robert Watson Marion * 

Howard, John Beryl Mannington Marion * 

Romine, Robert Xumberport Harrison 



Fairmont State Normal School 



121 



SENIOR NORMAL 



NAME 



POST OFFICE COUNTY 



1st. 2nd. 
S.S. Sem. Sem. SP 



Addison, Carrie Morgantown Monongalia 

Allen, Luvenia -^Hundred Wetzel 

Ammons, Estelle Fairview — Marion 

Baker, Georgia L Middlebourne Tyler 

Baker, Edythe B. Fairmont ... + Marion 

Balderson, Estyl Fairmont .... Marion 

Baxter, Leonora Sutton Braxton .... 

Baxter, Anna Sutton Braxton 

Beach, Ethel — Weston Lewis 

Beall, Loretta Mildred.. Morgantown Monongalia 

Beall, Mary Mannington Marion 

Becker, Mary Bertha ...Fairmont Marion 

Becker, Twyla C Fairmont Marion 

Bennett, Ethel Webster Springs.. Webster ...... 

Bennett, Ocie -Monongah Marion 

Berry, Leota Morgan.-.Fairmont Marion 

Berry, Meryl Fairmont Marion 

Bethel, Mrs. George S... Enterprise Harrison 

Bevans, Clara Fairmont Marion 

Bills, Mary E St, Mary's .Pleasants ... 

Bissett, Maude Hundred Wetzel 

Bolman, Marion I Shinnston Harrison ..... 

Bolte, Hazel ..Militus ...._ Doddridge 

Boore, Lelia Carol Grant Town Marion ...... 

Bond, Ruth .Albright -Preston 

Brandenburg, Marie ....Belington Barbour 

Briggs, Delia New Martinsv'le Wetzel 

Brooke, Esther W Fairmont Marion 

Bryant, Mary G Fairmont Marion 

Bunner, Pauline Williamstown Wood 

Carroll, Myra Masontown Preston 

Caten, Frances Benwood Marshall 

Chambers, Pearle .Fairmont Marion 

Chaney, Regina Fairmont Marion 

Chaney, Ruth Eleanor..Watson Marion 

Chapman, Myrtle Sutton Braxton 

Chrislip, Mary E. H Shinnston Harrison 

Clayton, Virginia D Fairmont Marion 

Clelland, Irene .Fairmont Marion 

Click, Mary. Ravenswood Jackson 

Combs, Bertha Fairmont Marion 

Conaway, Marzella Grafton Taylor 

Conaway, Mrs. Zella....Grafton Taylor 



122 Fairmont State Normal School 



1st. 2nd. 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S.S. Sem. Sem. 

Copenhaver, Ruby — Wallace — -Harrison • 

Corbin, Gay Constance..Meadowbrook .Harrison * •- 

Cordray, Martha Ruth..Morgantown Monongalia 

Cordray, Louise Fairmont Marion * * 

Core, Esie Lee Masontown -Preston • 

Covalt, Lois Fairmont Marion * * 

Cox, Mrs. Pearl Smith..Grafton Taylor * * * 

Craig, Phern Richwood Nicholas 

Crutchfield, Edith Burnsville Braxton * * 

Cunningham, Bernice..Mannington Marion 

Cunningham, Mrs. B...Wyatt — Harrison 

Davis, Hattie Hammond .Marion * 

Davis, Clover Clarksburg Harrison .... * 

Davis, Pauline P Enterprise -Harrison ... * • 

DeMoss, Lena Grafton Taylor 

DeMoss, Ada Grafton Taylor * 

DeMoss, Minnie Grafton Taylor * 

Dickinson, Virginia ...Cheat Haven, Pa. 

Digman, Cleo B Montrose Randolph ... * * 

Dilworth, Wilda Grafton ..Taylor * * 

Doman, Nellie Hazel— .Cameron Marshall * * 

Doman, Advina A Fairmont Marion * * 

Dotson, Mrs. Mary E. ..Fairmont Marion * * 

Dragoo, Alma Irene Smithfield Wetzel * * 

Drummond, Pearl Hepzibah Harrison ..._ 

Duncan, Nellie R Cameron Marshall * 

Dunn, Bonnie Canfield Braxton * 

Durr, Anna Mary Tunnelton Preston * 

Efaw, Lillie Olive Mannington -Marion * * 

Faddis, Elizabeth Fairmont Marion * 

Faddis, Flora Belle Fairmont Marion * * 

Faust, Alice P Fairmont Marion * 

Fawcet, Virginia Grafton Taylor • 

Felton, Amy Alice Parsons Tucker * 

Findley, Pauline Clarksburg Harrison • 

Finley, Veva Grafton ...» -Taylor * 

Flanagan, Grace Hendricks Tucker • 

Flanagan, Stella Hendricks Tucker * 

Ford, Euphama Independence Taylor 

Fortney, Braxie R -Shinnston .-Harrison 

Franklin, Osee H Spencer Roane * 

Franz, Margaret L Shinnston Harrison * * 

Fromhart, Mary Newburg -Preston ... * 

Fuller, Merle Fairmont Marion • • 

Funk, Inez Tunnelton -Preston * 

Furman, Lena N Morgan town Monongalia • 



Fairmont State Normal School 123 



S.S. Sem. Sem. SP 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY 1st. 2nd. 

Gainer, Wanda — Belington Barbour * 

Gall, Ginevra Moatsville Barbour * * 

Gardner, Emma _Cowen ...Webster * 

Gibson, Edith Newburg Preston * 

Gordon, Gladys Fairmont Marion * * 

Griffin, Mary -Shinnston Harrison * 

Griffith, Margaret Fairmont Marion * 

Groves, Dora Grafton Taylor * 

Groves, Beulah M Deepwell -Nicholas * * 

Gum, Freeda Jeanette. Webster Springs .Webster * 

Gumm, Mary B Frametown Braxton * * * 

Gump, Mildred Fairview Marion * * 

Haas, Gwendolyn Fairmont Marion * * 

Haddix, Jessie Ethel. ..Grafton Taylor * 

Hale, Lenore Fairmont Marion * 

HalL Belle C -Parkersburg Wood ..._ * 

Hamilton, Ruth Farmington Marion * * 

Harbert, Ada Lumberport Harrison * * 

Harman, Geraldine Richwood Nicholas * 

Harr, Ruth Eleanor Fairmont Marion * * 

Harris, Selma Ravenswood Jackson * * 

Harvey, Anna Sue Bayard Grant * 

Harvey, Mrs. Maud Rachel -Marion * 

Hawkins, Thelma Metz Marion * * 

Hawkins, Wilma J -Fairmont Marion * 

Hedges, Edna Fairmont Marion * * 

Heinzman, Blanche New Martinsv'le Wetzel * 

Henderson, Myrna Portland, Ohio.... * * 

Hennen, Margaret L._..Metz _ Marion • * * 

Hennen, Enid Cameron Marshall * 

Henry, Neva -Morgantown Monongalia * 

Hess, Helen Mannington .Marion ........ * 

Hickman, Beatrice Ripley Jackson * 

Hill, Betty Louise. Fairmont Marion 

Hill, Zelma -..Middlebourne .....Wetzel * 

Himmelrick, Essie Burton Wetzel * 

Hines, Genevieve Orndoff Webster * 

Hoffman, Georgia Morgantown Monongalia * 

Hoffman, Laura B .Kingwood — Preston * 

Howard, Lillian May — Mannington Marion * * 

Hughes, Hilda Shinnston Harrison * * 

Hurd, Lillian -Cameron Marshall * * 

Ice, Mary Ellen Watson — Marion * • 

Ice, Opal Shinnston Harrison * 

Jenkins, Martha Jean.-Fairmont Marion * 

John, Olive Chester Hancock .... * 



124 



Fairmont State Normal School 



name 



POST OFFICE COUNTY 



1st. 2nd. 
S.S. Sem. Sem. SP 



Johnson, Adaline — Mannington Marion * 

Johnston, Virginia M—Cameron Marshall 

Jones, Mildred Hundred Wetzel 

Joyce, Irene Four States Marion * 

Juergens, Patria Mc Richwood .Nicholas 

Keener, Lucille Fairmont Marion 

Keller, Ruth Ravenswood Jackson 

Kelley, Alma Lillian.. ..Fairmont Marion 

Kendall, Mildred Mannington Marion * 

Kerns, Loretta Smithfield -Wetzel * 

Kessell, Faith Ripley Jackson * 

Kimble, Gladys Littleton Wetzel * 

Kirkland, Eliza New Martinsv'le Wetzel * 

Kirkpatrick, Viola Clarksburg Harrison 

Knight, Sarah Dunn ....Fairmont Marion 

Knott, Pearl Evelyn ....Tunnelton Preston * 

Kramer, Charlotte Little Falls Monongalia 

Kramer, Marion Fairmont Marion * 

Kryder, Beulah Dana Kanawha .... * 

Kuhn, Margaret E Monongah ...Marion * 

Kyle, Betty Burge -Parkersburg Wood * 

Lanham, Mildred V Fairmont Marion * 

Law Irene Meadowbrook Harrison 

Lawrence, Katherine....Davis Tucker 

Lemley, Margaret V...-Burton .Wetzel * 

Lewis, Edith -Fairmont Marion 

Linger, Delia Fairmont Marion * 

Linger, Mona Roanoke -Lewis * 

Linger, Mona Corrine- Fairmont Marion * 

Loper, Mabel ...Cameron -Marshall * 

Lucas, Irene ..Enterprise .Harrison * 

Lewis, Eugenia ..Rachel Marion 

Madill, Lucille Shinnston -Harrison * 

Malotte, Virginia B. ...Fairmont Marion 

Martin, Emzie R Wyatt Harrison 

Martin, Lalah Shinnston Harrison 

Marsh, Mary Louise ...Cairo -Ritchie 

Martin, Avis -Fairmont Marion 

Matthews, Emma Cameron Marshall .... 

Mayhall, Virginia Moundsville Marshall .... 

Mayyou, Mildred Reedsville Preston .... 

McCauley, Margaret ....Fairmont Marion 

McGee, Adah G -Meadowbrook Harrison .... 

McGonigal, Margaret....Shinnston Harrison .... 

Mclntyre, Kathryn Clarksburg -Harrison 

McKain, Anne E Monongah Marion 



Fairmont State Normal School 125 

S.S. Sem. S-em. SP 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY 1st. 2nd. 

McKain Margaret Monongah — Marion * 

McKinley, Virginia B... Clarksburg Harrison * 

McLaughlin, Nelle Y...Marlinton Pocahontas * 

McNeely, Pauline Conneaut, Ohio... * * 

McVicker, Daisy Fairmont Marion * 

Medis, Thelma Sistersville Tyler * * 

Merrifield, Nedra M Fairmont Marion * * * 

Metz, Mrs. Flo -Wallace -..Marion * 

Michael, Eva Fairmont Marion * 

Millan, Marion Smithfield Wetzel * 

Miller, Pauline ..Fairmont Marion * 

Morgan, Naomi -..Fairmont Marion * 

Morgan, Doris Mae ....Rainelle Greenbrier .. * 

Mort, Lucile -..Monongah -Marion * * 

Moore, Pansy Wallace Harrison * * 

Morrison, Edna Mae ....Shinnston Harrison * * 

Mramor, Marjorie Davis Tucker * * 

Murdock, Mary Bluefield Mercer * 

Murphy, Irene ..Morgantown Monongalia * 

Myers, Clearcy Ellen. ...Shinnston Harrison * 

Nixon, Ethel Clayton-Fairmont Marion * * * 

Norris, Kathryn Valley Chapel ....Lewis * * 

Nuzum, Mary Fairmont Marion * * 

Orndoff, Madge Dye.... Hundred Wetzel * 

Pastorius Millicent -Clarksburg Harrison * 

Perrine, Eula Waggy — Webster * 

Petito, Rozena _..Mt. Clare Harrison * * * 

Phares, Myrtle — Riverton Pendleton .. * 

Phillips, Amy Virginia.. Wadestown Monongalia * 

Phillips, Genevieve Cameron — Marshall * * 

Phillips, Inez Cameron Marshall * 

Phipps, Eva Smithfield Wetzel * 

Piggott, Ruth -Shinnston -..Harrison * 

Plotts, Wilma Chester Hancock * 

Plotts, Frances Chester Hancock * 

Poe, Ethel -..Hundred Wetzel * 

Poe, Grace Jacob Marion * * 

Potts, Helen E New Martinsv'le Wetzel * 

Post, Mary Frances Fairmont Marion * 

Powell, Cecyle Blacksville Monongalia * 

Powell, June Myrtle Haywood -Harrison * 

Powell, Opal Mae Blacksville -Monongalia * * 

Powell, Lillian . — — Fairmont Marion * * 

Perrine, Audree Skyles .Webster * 

Pyles, Laura Ivie -Newburg Preston * 

Quinet, Yvonne Morgantown Monongalia * 



126 Fairmont State Normal School 



S.S. Sem. Sem. SP 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY 1st. 2nd. 

Radcliffe, Jeanette Fairmont Marion * 

Randolph, Halcyon T...W. Milford Harrison * * * 

Rex, Winifred Rachel Marion * 

Rexroad, Beulah W -Morgantown Monongalia * 

Ransell, Elizabeth Parkersburg -Wood * 

Reed, Mrs. Harris Monongah -Marion * 

Reed, Gladys Currey Monongah -Marion * 

Riggs, Eva M _ Cameron Marshall * 

Riley, Mildred Shinnston Harrison * * 

Ritchie, Louise Fairmont Marion * * 

Ritchie, Nellie Frankli n Pendleton .. * * 

Robey, Dorothy Shinnston Harrison * 

Robey, Florence Fairmont Marion * * 

Robinson, Beryle Hastings Wetzel * 

Robinson, Flossie Masontown Preston * 

Robinson, Pauline S Shinnston Harrison * 

Robinson, Ruby Lumberport Harrison * 

Robinson, Thelma H Bridgeport Harrison * 

Rogers, Freda Grafton -Taylor * 

Rose, Marian Margaret..Middlebourne Tyler * 

Ross, Zehna Virginia....Simpson Taylor * * 

Rudy, Mildred -Rachel Marion * 

Ryan, Virginia Mannington Marion * * 

Sachse, Jane K ...Bridgeport Harrison * 

Scott, Jean -Fairmont Marion _ * * * 

Scott, Mary Louise Elkins Randolph .... * * 

Scott, Nellie Smithfield -Wetzel * * 

Shaffer, Florence R Grafton Taylor * * 

Sharps, Helen Lumberport Harrison .... * * * 

Shaver, Mary E Riohwood Nicholas * 

Shepherd, Bessie Belington Barbour • 

Sherman, Nannie B # ReidTb Grove^M.D. Dorchester .. * 

Shoemaker, Pearl -Fairmont Marion * 

Shough, Lottie H Hundred -Wetzel * * 

Shreve, Alma Enterprise Harrison * * * 

Silver, Celia Fairmont Marion * * 

Silver, Rachel Fairmont Marion * * 

Sine, Annie Laurie Blacksville Monongalia * * * 

Skiles, Emily Jo Fairmont Marion * 

Smith, Alma Rivesville Marion * * 

Smith, Lois Newburg Preston _ 

Smith, Pearl Fairmont Marion * 

Smith, Eleanor Fairmont Marion * * 

Smith, Phyllis Monongah ...., Marion * * 

Smith, Wilbia Fairmont Marion * * 

Snodgrass, Daphne Smithfield -Wetzel * 



Fairmont State Normal School 127 



1st. 2nd. 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S.S. Sem. Sem. SP 

Snodgrass, Mary Mannington Marion ........ * 

Snodgrass, Pearl Mannington Marion * * 

Springer' Lula E Enterprise Harrison * * 

Stanley, Mabel Fairmont Marion * 

Stansbury, Dorothy Fairmont Marion * * 

Stewart, Ora Blanche..Fairmont Marion * * 

Sturgeon, Ruth Woodruff, Pa * 

Sturm, Louise Violet—.Enterprise -Harison * * 

Straight, Elba Mannington Marion ........ * 

Strimel, Julia Corinne.. Point Marion.Pa. Fayette * 

Talkington, Sadie Hundred Wetzel * 

Taylor, Mary Parkersburg Wood * 

Teagarden, Flo Cameron Marshall * * 

Tennant, Sallie —.Barrackville .... . — Marion * 

Tetrick, Vera Dome,. —Enterprise Harrison * 

Thomas, Madeline Barrackville Marion * * 

Thompson, Edith Holliday's Cove... Hancock * 

Thornhill, Gladys P Parsons -Tucker • * 

Thurber, Ethel M -Wheeling .-Ohio * 

Toothman, Lillie Mae.... Fairview Marion * * 

Tripp, Bettie Fairmont Marion * * 

Rucker, Faye Canfield Braxton * 

Twyman, Lillian M Middlebourne Tyler * 

Vanzandt, Kathleen Mannington Marion * * 

Veon, Emma Waverly Pleasants .... * 

Walker, Naomi Fairmont ...Marion * 

Wallace, Helen West Union Doddridge .... * 

Walter, Lena Marie Thornton Taylor * 

Ward, Helen Mill Creek Randolph .._ * 

Warder, Ina M. Grafton Taylor * 

Warner, Ruby ...._ -Davis Tucker * 

Watson, Margaret I Metz Marion * * 

Weaver, Mary Fairview Marion * 

Webner, Mary Louise....Glover Gap Marion * 

Wells, Dorothy E Fairmont Marion * * 

West, Gladys Lost Creek Harrison * 

West, Phyllis Roanoke ..._ Lewis * 

White, Florence Grafton Taylor ..._ * 

Whiteman, Blanch S Shinnston -Harrison * * 

Wiles, Florence Hoult Marion * 

Wilson, Amanda E -Elizabeth ..Wirt * * 

Wilson B. Virginia ..Grafton Taylor * * 

Wilson, Virginia C ..Fairview Marion * * 

Wilson, Genevieve Kingwood Preston * 

Wotring, Ruth Louis.. .Morgantown Monongalia * 

Wright, Hilda Newburg Preston * 

Yeager, Edna Mannington Marion * 



128 Fairmont State Normal School 



1st. 2nd. 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S.S. Sem. Sem. SP 

Armstrong, Byron Independence Taylor ... * 

Beatty, Frank Terra Alta Preston * 

Bonner, John William-Wallace Harrison * 

Brown, Cecil Cyclone Wyoming .... * 

Cain, Wellington Reedy _ Roane * * 

Church, Archie Glover Gap Marion * 

Cuhbon, Claude Lumberport Harrison * 

Fleming, Joseph St. Mary's ...Pleasants .... * 

Herrington, Tasco Blacksville Monongalia * * 

Kennedy, Arlington Burton Wetzel ....... * 

Kyle, Orville Alison.... -Parkersburg Wood * 

Logsdon, M. DeWitt....Moundsville Marshall * * 

Michael, Paul Fairview Marion * 

Miller, Byron ..._ Fairview Marion * 

Morrow, Theodore Paden City Wetzel * 

Rector, Burlyn Shinnston Harrison * * 

Rittenhouse, George ....Rachel Marion * * * 

Rogers, Ebbert E Lumberport Harrison * 

Rowley, Joseph V -Shinnston -Harrison * 

Rush, William Everett- Glover Gap Marion * 

Sandy, Howard Monongah Marion * * 

Shuman, William A Blacksville Monongalia * * 

Snider, Otis Ralph Watson Marion * 

Sole, Edgar — Fairmont Marion * * 

Sypolt, William T Albright Preston * * 

Ice, Ben H Fairview -Marion * * 



Fairmont State Normal School 129 



JUNIOR NORMAL 



1st. 2nd. 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S.S. Sem. Sem. SP 

Abel, Sylvia Fairmont Marion * * 

Adams, Freda Manheim Preston * 

Allard, Evelyn Fairmont Marion * * 

Allen, Edonia G Holliday's Cove ....Hancock * 

Alley, Florence Glen Dale Marshall * 

Amnions, Edna Fairview Marion * * 

Anderson Sue Fairmont Marion * * 

Arnett, Grace Mannington Marion * 

Ashenhart, Bessie Mannington Marion * * * * 

Atha, Ermastine Fairmont Marion * * 

Bailey, Margaret E -Fairmont Marion * * 

Baker, Eulan Irene Gassaway Braxton * 

Baker, Marie — Glendale Marshall * * 

Baker, Martha ...Rivesville Marion * 

Baker, Opal Jean Alvy _ Tyler * 

Barr, Lillian Glover Gap Marion * 

Bassel, Florence V Mt. Clare Harrison * 

Beall, Meta G _ Fairmont Marion ........ * 

Belch, Mildred .Mannington „ Marion * * * 

Bendkowski, Regina ...Shinnston ..... Harrison * 

Bent, Ruth Clarksburg Harrison * 

Beverage, Hazel Mae. .Huntersville Pocahontas * 

Binns, Pauline Fairmont Marion * * 

Bissett, Maude Hundred Monongalia * 

Bissett, Opal Hundred Monongalia * * 

Bickford, Alice B -Tunnelton Preston „ * 

Blaney, Harriet K Grafton Taylor ~ * 

Blankenship, E. G ..Matewan Mingo * 

Bolman, Marion I Shinnston Harrison * 

Bolyard, Beatrice E Independence Preston * 

Bonnell, Alta Smithfield Wetzel * 

Bookman, Lillian Salem Harrison * 

Boone, Verna Everson Marion * 

Booth, Onnie -Parkersburg Wood * 

Boord, Louise Fairmont Marion * 

Boylan, Dorothy _Newburg -..-Preston ... * * 

Bradley, Anna .Littleton Wetzel _ * * 

Brandenburg Marie Belington Barbour * * 

Brannon, Anna Shinnston -Harrison * 

Brown, Dorothy .Newburg Preston * 

Brown, Elsie Virginia..Smithfield Wetzel * 

Britton, Opal .Camp Doddridge .. * 

Bullman, Lelia Estell.-.Wick ........Tyler * 



130 Fairmont State Normal School 



1st. 2nd. 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S.S. Sem. Sem. SP 

Burbridge, Mabel V Salem Harrison * 

Burke, Argyle P Newburg — Preston * 

Butcher, Genevieve M...Jane Lew Lewis _ * 

Buzzard, Ruth Cameron Marshall * 

Byard, Mildred .\..Metz Marion * 

Cain, Mrs. Pearl Reedy ..Roane _ * 

Call, Helen Cameron Marshall * * 

Campbell, Hattie P _Rivesville Marion * * 

Campbell, Faye Creston Wirt * 

Carney, Romanza A Lumberport Harrison * * 

Carpenter, Hattie ...Removal Webster * 

Casto, Mary Lou Clarksburg -Harrison * * 

Caughey, Sarah Chester Hancock * 

Cherrington, D. M Davis Tucker * 

Clayton, Dessie Grace..Fairview Marion * * 

Clovis, Virginia Pentress Monongalia * 

Cobun, Virginia _Morgantown Monongalia * 

Cochran, Nellie Jevan..Orndoff Webster * 

Conrad, Hazel Naomi...5mithfield -..Wetzel * * 

Copeman, Kathryn Kingwood -Preston * 

Corrick, Monta Beiington ...< Barbour * 

Cousins, Lorna Smithfield Wetzel * 

Cox, Margaret E Chester Hancock * * 

Cox, Tina .Miletus Doddridge .... * * 

Crane, Phyllis Clarksburg Harrison * * 

Crewe, Eula R Fairmont Marion * 

Crimm, Mary E Clarksburg Harrison * * 

Cronin, Etta R Fairmont Marion * 

Crow, Naomi Cameron Marshall * 

Crow, Thelma Cameron Marshall * 

Cumberledge, Alma Littleton Wetzel * 

Cummins, Mary E Clarksburg Harrison * * 

Cunningham, Ethel ....Mannington Marion * * 

Cunningham, Etta Fairmont ..._ Marion * 

Cunningham, Vivian ..Littleton Wetzel * 

Culbertson, Esther Mannington Marion * 

Dadisman, Clarice .._..Grafton Taylor * 

Daetwyler, Bernice Helvetia Randolph ... * 

Davidson, Martha Monongah Marion * * 

Davis, Thelma Four States Marion * 

Davisson, Amanda Clarksburg -Harrison * 

Dawson, Conra Shinnston — Harrison * 

Deahl, Elizabeth Newburg Preston • * 

DeLancy, Thelma ..Parkersburg Wood „ * 

Delaney, Mrs. Arley.... Burton Monongalia * 

Dennison, Gaynelle Clarksburg Harrison * * 



Fairmont State Normal School 131 

1st. 2nd. 
NAME POST OFFICE ;COUNTY S.S. Sem. Sem. SP 

Dennison, Pauline Clarksburg: Harrison * * 

Dent, Mary Troy Gilmer * * 

Derenburger, Mae Ravenswood Jackson * 

Devers, Esther Zoe Grafton Taylor * * 

DeVault, Charlotte Moundsville Marshall * 

DiBacco, Edith Thomas Tucker * 

Dolan, Catherine Clarksburg Harrison * 

Dorsey, Lora Kingwood Preston * 

Duckworth, D. M Gormania Grant * 

Duncan, Adeline Wallace Harrison * 

Dunigan, Mary E. Mannington Marion • * 

Dunn, Freda Canfield -Braxton * * * 

Elder, Vada —Belington -Barbour * * 

Evans, Gladys Newburg ...* ...Preston * 

Fawcett Glenna H Kingwood — Preston * 

Feather, Mary Fairmont ..Marion * * 

Felton, Mrs. Ferol Moatsville Barbour * 

Ferguson, Josephine ...Fairmont Marion * 

Fisher, Ruth Farmington Marion * 

Flanagan, Edna McMechen -Marshall * * 

Flanagan, Mabel Morgantown Monongalia * 

Fleming, Geneva Shinnston Harrison * * 

Fletcher, Martha -Fairmont Marion * 

Floyd, Glenna H Mannington Marion * 

Fontz, Virginia Bayard Grant * 

Ford, Alma Independence Taylor _ * 

Ford, Christine Independence Taylor _ * 

Ford, Ethyln Maurine.-McWhorter Harrison * * 

Forman, Catherine Morgantown Monongalia * * 

Forsythe, Florence Davis Tucker * 

Fortney, Braxie R Shinnston -Harrison 

Frost, Lovilla ...-Fairmont Marion 

Frey, Hazel —Fairmont Marion * 

Funk, Ruth Tunnelton Preston * 

Furner, Mary Dale ....Wolf Summit Harrison * 

Gall, Evelyn Belington Barbour * 

Ganoe, Charlotte Weirton Hancock * * * 

Gariow, Mayme VanVoorhis Monongalia * 

Gaskins, Mary Mae Fairmont Marion * * 

Gaunt, Katie Belington Barbour * 

Golden, Margaret Clarksburg Harrison * 

Goldin, Mayme Parkersburg Wood * 

Gough, Dessie Grafton Taylor * * 

Gough, Ethel Grafton ...._ Taylor * * 

Gould, Martha Jane Buckhannon Upshur * 

Gray, Gladys Madeline- Berwind McDowell .... * 



132 Fairmont State Normal School 

1st. 2nd. 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S.S. Sem. Sem. SP 

Gregory, Elsie Jean Webster Springs. Webster * * 

Griffin, Opal Parkersburg Wood * 

Griffith, Katherine Farmington Marion * * 

Grimm, Margaret Terra Alta Preston * 

Grove, Louise Watson Marion * * 

Groves Mabel Grafton -Taylor * 

Guilmette, Mrs. Anna..Morgantown Monongalia 

Guest, Clara Jeannette, Pa. .... 

Gumm, Mrs. Grace ...... Kingwood ..Preston * 

Haslebacker, Ona Buckhannon Upshur * 

Haffa, Margaret Brady Monongalia * 

Haggerty, Louise Mannington Marion * 

Haines, Georgia E Littleton „ Wetzel * 

Hall, Beatrice —Fairmont Marion * * 

Hall, Eva Alice Clarksburg Harrison * 

Hall, Georgia Ruth Hoult ...._ Marion * * 

Hall, Violet -Terra Alta Preston * 

Hamrick, Eula Webster Springs . Webster * 

Hamrick, Flossie Bergoo ...Webster * 

Hamrick, Lettie ...Webster Springs.. Webster * 

Hamrick, Ruth V Rivesville Marion * * 

Hannah, Ruby Mae Slaty Fork Pocahontas * 

Harriman, Nellie Kingwood Preston * 

Harrison, Lillian Burlington Mineral * 

Hartford, Nora New Cumberland .Hancock * 

Hartley, Alyce Kitzmiller, Md._.. Garrett * * 

Hawkins, Opal Fairmont Marion * * 

Hawkins, Ruth Rachel -Marion 

Harvey, Ruby Lumberport Harrison * * 

Hawkins, Wilma ...Fairmont Marion * 

Hayhurst, Anna Watson Marion * 

Heiskell, Flota Independence Preston * 

Henderson, C. L. Fairmont Marion * 

Henry, Lena . Lumberport Harrison * 

Hersman, Dorothy Pullman Ritchie * 

Hill, Irene Link Shepherdstown ...Jefferson .... * 

Hinkle, Leona Richwood Nicholas * 

Hinkle, Ruth -Renick's Valley..- Greenbrier . * 

Hinkle, Virginia Fairmont ..Marion * 

Hines, Clara Caress Braxton _..~ * 

Hoffa, Margaret ..Independence -Taylor * 

Hoover, Weltha Payne.. Webster Springs.. Webster * 

Horner, Estelle -Weston Lewis * * * 

Hudson, Mrs. Ida. ...... Morgantown Monongalia * * 

Huggins, Helen Dale....Jacksonburg Wetzel * * 

Iden, Nellie Davis — Tucker * 



Fairmont State Normal School 133 



1st. 2nd. 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S.S. Sem. Sem. SP 

Inghram, Adda Mae Fairview Marion * * 

Jacobs, Florence -Fairmont Marion * * 

James, Catherine Sutton Braxton * * 

Jaumot, Alice Clarksburg Harrison * * 

Johnson, Dorothy Ambridge, Pa Beaver * 

Johnson, Nola Grafton Taylor * 

Johnson, Ruth -Peach Creek Logan * 

Jones, Evelyn F Clarksburg Harrison * * 

Jones, Pearl Baxter -Marion * * 

Kehl, Helen Louise Mannington Marion * * 

Kellar, Noco Clarksburg Harrison * * 

Kelley, Clemence Webster Springs- Webster * 

Kelley, Marie Esta Wolf Summit Harrison * * 

Kenney, Catherine A Tunnelton Preston * 

Kerns, Mary -Fairmont Marion * * 

Kerr, Isabelle Fairmont Marion * * 

Kerzak, Erma Shinnston Harrison * * * 

Kidwell, Agnes Ford.... Clarksburg Harrison * 

King, Mildred E Worthington Marion * * 

Kinder, Nettie Bouer Braxton * 

Kinkead, Nellie Potomac Manor -Mineral * 

Knight, Lena Mae Mannington Marion * * 

Koon, Bessie Fairmont Marion * * 

Kyle, Bertie ...Parkersburg Wood _ * 

Kramer, Charlotte Little Falls Monongalia * 

Kinsey, Grace -Fairmont Marion * 

Kryder, Fay Loyola ...Dana _ Kanawha .... * 

Laham, Bernice Independence Preston * 

Lantz, Mabel Davis Tucker — * 

Larew, Esther Newburg — Preston * 

Laughlin, Irene Metz Marion * 

Lawk, Mrs. Clara B Crawford Lewis * 

Lawrence, Mildred Newburg Preston * 

Levy, Alta Moundsville Marshall 1 * 

Levy Edythe Holliday's Cove Hancock * 

Lewis, Eugenia Rachel Marion * * 

Lewis, Edith Fairmont Marion * 

Lewis, Lucille Rachel Marion * 

Lightburn, Mary J.. — Jane Lew Lewis * * 

Linn, Viola Watson Marion * * 

Linville, Mary Mannington Marion 

Little, Beatrice Bridgeport Taylor" * 

Long, Mildred Littleton Wetzel * 

Lough, Floreen V Shinnston Harrison * * 

Lough, Lena Grafton -Taylor - * 

Lucas, Pauline E Kingmont Marion ... — * * 



134 Fairmont State Normal School 



1st. 2nd. 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S.S. Sem. Sem. SP 

Lynch, Sylva — Morgantown Monongalia * 

Lyons, Josephine - Independence Preston * * 

Mace, Lula Suncrest Randolph .... * * 

Magers, Grace V Mannington Marion * * * 

Mahle, Opal -Davis _ Tucker * 

Mahle, Ruby Davis _ Tucker * 

Martin, Lalah Shinnston Harrison * 

Martin, Mrs. G Volga ~ Barbour * 

Martin, Mabel E Jacksonburg Wetzel _ * * 

Martin, Olive Fairmont Marion * * 

Matthew, Muade Independence Preston * 

Mayhall, Ollie Moundsville Marshall * 

Mays, Margaret Grafton -Taylor* * * 

McCardle, Amy Cameron Marshall * * 

McCarty, Erma Marlinton Pocahontas * * 

McConkey, Blanche ....Bower -Braxton * * 

McCoy, Romaine Fairview Marion * * 

McCray, Ruth Fairview Marion * 

McGee, Alma -Meadowbrook Harrison * * 

McKain, Helen Monongah Marion * * * 

McNutt, Catherine — Clarksburg Harrison * 

Menear, Helen Grafton ..._ Taylor * * 

Merrifield, Josephine.... Fairmont Marion * * 

Merrifield, Mary Edna.. Smithf ield ...._ Wetzel * 

Mettler, Virginia Grafton Taylor * 

Michael, Bertha Grant Town Marion * 

Michaels, Oda Fairview Marion • * 

Miller, Eleanor Nixon.. Fairmont Marion * 

Miller, Evelyn — Fairview Marion * 

Milligan, Elizabeth Chester Hancock • 

Monroe, Phyllis -Fairmont Marion * 

Moon, Mildred -Newburg Preston _ * * * 

Moore, Mahlon Fairview Marion * 

Moomaw, Gladys Shinnston Harrison * 

Morgan, Jane Fairmont Marion * 

Morgan, Edna Cameron Marshall * 

Morris, Blanche Fairmont Marion * * 

Morris, Marguerite Fairmont Marion * * 

Morrow, Mary Paden City Wetzel ........ • 

Murphy, Anna Newburg Preston * 

Murphy, Irene Newburg Preston * 

Murphy, Margaret — Fairmont Marion • * 

Muster, Nora -Lumberport Harrison * 

Nay, Edith Harbert Brown Harrison • 

Newman, Anna Benwood Marshall • 

Nicholson, O. V. D Morgantown Monongalia * 



Fairmont State Normal School 135 



1st. 2nd. 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S.S. Sem. Sem. SP 

Niland, Kathryne Grafton Taylor * * 

Norris, Lena Valley Chapel Lewis * * 

Norvell, Ada ...« Ten Mile Upshur * 

Norvell, Artie Ten Mile Upshur * 

Norvell, Causbie Ten Mile Upshur * 

Noud, Marian Irene Morgantown Monongalia • 

Odell, Elsie Shinnston Harrison . * 

Orr, Alma Fairmont Marion * 

Orr, Hazel Shinnston Harrison * 

Orr, Reva Shinnston Harrison * 

Palmer, Laila Sherman Jackson . • 

Parrack, Alison Terra Alta Preston * 

Parrish, Elizabeth Mannington Marion 

Parri&h, Myrtle Fairview ..Marion * 

Pendergast, Genevieve.. Newburg Preston * 

Peterson, Sylvia Dellslow Monongalia * 

Pethtal, Milline Jane.... Fairview Marion * 

Phillips, Anna M Mannington Marion * 

Phillips, Ethel Le O.-.-Cameron Marshall * 

Phillips, Mabel Wadestown Monongalia * 

Phillips, Mary Louise.. Wadestown -Monongalia * 

Pigott, Daisy ..Lumberport Harrison * 

Pigott, Hattie Mae Enterprise Harrison 

Pigott, Reva Wlalace Harrison * 

Pinto, Frances Marie.. Thomas Tucker * * 

Poe, Sylvia Ethelyn Littleton Wetzel * 

Pople, Pauline Fairmont Marion * 

Postlewait, Anna V Portland, Ohio... 

Powell, Pearle Blacksville ..Monongalia * 

Prickett, Irene —.. Fairmont Marion * 

Primm, Goldie Harrisville Rtichie * * 

Provance, Mary Grafton Taylor * 

Pyles, Laura G -Seebert Pocahontas * 

Reed, Louise Fairmont Marion 

Reeves, Margaret C Fairmont Marion * 

Reppard, Susie Smithfield Wetzel * 

Richardson, Bessie ......Fairmont Marion 

Richardson, Edith Flatwoods Braxton * 

Riggleman, Elva Davis Tucker * 

Ringler, Orela Grafton Taylor * 

Riley, Lillian Shinnston Harrison * 

Riley, Merle Shinnston Harrison * 

Rittenhouse, D. L Clarksburg Harrison * 

Robertson, Agnes Colfax Marion * 

Rockwell, Lena -Enterprise Harrison * 

Rhodes, Wavie Belpre, Ohio _ 



136 Fairmont State Normal School 

1st. 2nd. 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S.S. Sem. Sem. SP 

Robinson, Alverda Wallace Harrison — * 

Romano, Helen F Fairmont Marion * * 

Rose, Mary Ellen Heaters Braxton * * * 

Ross, Eleanor Alice Simpson Taylor * * 

Rosser, Arlene Coketon .Tucker * * * 

Robinson, Lucille Lumberport -Harrison * 

Russell, Adeline Burton Wetzel * 

Russo, Mary Louise Fairmont Marion * 

Sage, Rose Marie Wierton -Brooke * * 

Sanders, Zana V Fairview Marion * 

Sandy, Mray Leoma ....Wick Tyler * 

Satterfield, Gladys Fairmont Marion * * 

Satterfield, Evelyn Fairmont Marion * 

Satterfield, Martha ....Rivesville Marion * * * 

Saucer, Hazel -Grafton Taylor * * 

Sawyer, Nellie Hundred Wetzel * 

Scheffner, Helen Fairmont Marion * * 

Sehoolnic, Alice Fairmont ..Marion * 

Scranage, Pearl -Grafton Taylor * 

Shahan, Maude Fairmont ..... Marion * 

Shanes, Grace Fairview Marion * 

Sheets, Ruby Independence Preston * 

Shriver, Lottie Wallace Harrison * 

Silcott, Hilda K Newburg Preston * 

Smith, Ethel -Chester Hancock * 

Smith, Evelyn ..Pittsburgh, Pa Allegheny .... * * 

Smith, Lillian Glover Gap Marion * 

Smith, Lula Independence Preston * 

Snodgrass, Mary Mannnigton Marion * 

Snyder, Edna — Rachel Marion * * * 

Snyder, Ruby Rachel Marion * * 

Springer, Alice Terra Alta Preston * 

Squires, Nellie Independence Preston * 

Stalnaker, Bessie M Fairmont Marion * * 

Stadler, Louise Helvetia Randolph * 

Stark, Zula Wilma Brown Harrison * 

Steele, Alta Blacksville Monongalia * 

Sursli, Nellie Helvetia Randolph .... * 

Swiger, Olive -Smithfield Wetzel * 

Straight, Jennie Fairmont Marion * * 

Talkington, Mildred Mannington Marion * * 

Tatterson, Ruby ...Fairmont Marion * * 

Teagarden, Bertha Littleton -Wetzel * 

Tedrick, Virginia Fairmont Marion * * * 

Tennant, Lucy Blacksville Monongalia * 

Tennant, Lula Fairview Marion * 



Fairmont State Normal School 137 



1st. 2nd. 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S.S. Sem. Sem. SP 

Tennant, Stella Marie_Mooresville Monongalia * * 

Thomas, Isabelle Blacksville Monongalia * 

Thomas, Kathleen Barrackville Marion * * 

Thrash, Mildred Jane Lew Harrison * * * 

Tonkery, Mabel Monongah -Marion * * 

Toothman, Corinne Baxter Marion * 

Travis, Gladys Thornton Taylor * 

Trembly, Gertrude Kingwood Preston * 

Tucker, Lyda -Chester Hancock * 

Tyson, Thelma Davis Tucker * 

Twyman, Katherine L...Middlebourne Tyler 

Underwood, Grace Fairview Marion * 

Underwood. Harriett ..Fairview Marion * * * 

Underwood, Mae Fairview Marion * 

Vaught, Claire Elizabeth .... Wirt * * 

Virgin, Mary Ellen — Hundred Wetzel .... * * 

Villers. Alice _ Littleton Wetzel * 

Wagoner, Edra Shinnston Harrison * 

Walls, Waunita Independence Preston * 

Walter, Lena ..Thornton -Taylor * 

Wassum, Margaret V...Hundred Wetzel * * 

Way, Erma M -Shinnston ...Harrison * 

White, M. Virginia Moundsville Marshlal * 

White, May Hundred Wetzel * 

Whitescarver, Nellie ..Grafton Taylor * 

Westerman, Helen New Martinsv'le Wetzel * 

White, Ruth Grafton Taylor * 

Wiles, Florence E Hoult Marion * 

Wiles, Berdena Albright Preston * 

Wilhelm, Marie Watson Marion * * 

Williams, Ethel Bell_..Grafton Taylor * * 

Wilson, Mary Burlington Mineral * 

Wilson, Mary Independence Preston * 

Wiseman, Olive -Barrackville Marion * 

Wisman, Virginia Barrackville Marion * * 

Young, Nell Clarksburg Harrison * 

Woofter, Nina Parkersburg Wood * 

Wood, Stella Fairmont Marion * 



Ammons, Stephen Fairview Marion * 

Arcuri, Joseph Fairmont Marion * 

Arnett, Roy Mannington Marion * 

Arnold, Holmes A -Davis Tucker * 

Ashcraft, Ray — Mannington ..._ Marion * 

Baker, David H Gassaway Braxton 

Barker, Harold Mannnigton Marion * 



138 



Fairmont State Normal School 



NAME 



POST OFFICE COUNTY 



1st. 2nd. 
S.S. Sem. Sem. SP 



Barr, Glen Otho -Glover Gap Marion 

Barr, Homer Fartnington Marion 

Bavely, Ernest -Monongah Marion 

Brown, Morris Catawba Marion 

Cain, Francis - Mt. Clare Harrison 

Cartright, Leo J Rachel Marion 

Caton, Ralph Edgal ...Clifton Mills Preston _ 

Clovis, Walter Pentress Monongalia 

Cox, Clarence Blacksville Monongalia 

Cross, Rex L. Wana Monongalia 

Darah, Bearl -..Fairview Marion 

Devine, Gilbert -Fairview Marion 

Duncan, Oral Wallace -Harrison 

Eddy, Orin Rivesville Marion 

Engleke, Chauncey Minnora Calhoun 

Gable, William — Cameron Marshall 

Gump, Glenn Fairview Marion 

Goodwin, Hayward ....Shinnston ...Harrison 

Haines, Orley Lemely.. Hundred Wetzel 

Hall, Dwight L -Blacksville .-Monongalia 

Haught, Beryl Fairview Marion 

Headley, Lester Fairview Marion 

Henry, Leslie Morgantown Monongalia 

Henthorne, Roy Jacksonburg Wetzel 

Huffman, Clyde Allen .Mannington Marion 

Holden, Ray Shinnston Harrison 

Kimble, Rusell Littleton Wetzel 

Kinney, Gentsel .Terra Alta Preston 

Kramer, Allen -Little Falls Monongalia 

Kuhn, Homer -Burton Wetzel 

Lemley, Howard Burton Wetzel 

Lyons, Junior Independence Preston 

Martin, Paul Volga Barbour 

McDonald, Sam Monongah Marion 

Meredith Robert Mt. Clare Harrison 

Metz, Francis Wallace Harrison 

Moore, Mahlon -Fairview Marion 

Monroe, Lawton Lumberport .Harrison 

Nay, Dale Lumberport Harrison 

Null, Earl ...._ Littleton Wetzel 

Nuzum, Reanous Bridgeport Harrison 

Parrish, Lee Mannington Marion 

Pyles, Albert Newburg Preston 

Reed, Fred M Watson Marion 

Reed, John Clark Watson Marion 

Robinson, Glenn Shinnston Harrison 

Robinson, Willis Shinnston Harrison 



Fairmont State Normal School 139 



1st. 2nd. 
NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY S.S. Sem. Sem. SP 

Robinson, Waymon H...Brown -Harrison * 

Riley, Willis Roscoe....Reedsville Preston * 

Sayres, Lloyd -Grafton Taylor * * 

Scanlon, Clarence Morgantown Monongalia * 

Shanes, Ira Fairview ..Marion * 

Smith, Levi E Morgantown Monongalia * 

Sturm, Clarence L -Worthington Marlon * 

Taylor, Aubrey Fairmont Marion * * 

Tennant, Byron Rivesville Marlon * 

Tennant, Wayne Fairview Marion * * 

Thomas, Ward Bruceton Mills.... Preston * 

Walls, Howard Independence Preston .. * 

Williams, Blaine Fairview Marion „ * 

Yeager, Lora Fairview Marion * 

Zirkle, Stanley -Brown Harrison * 

Modesitt, Lawrence Parkersburg Wood _ * 

Moore, Robert Mannnigton Marion * 

Parrack, Allison Terra Alta Preston • 



140 Fairmont State Normal School 

MUSIC STUDENTS 1925-1926 
PIANO STUDENTS 



NAME post office county 

Armstrong, Mary Fairmont _ Marion 

Beatty, Margaret Fairmont Marion 

Bock, Percell _ „Shinnston .. Harrison ... 

Black, Mrs. W. T _ Fairmont Marion 

Clelland, Irene Fairmont Marion 

Cunningham, Helen Fairmont Marion 

Cunningham, Rachel Fairmont Marion 

Dariano, Regina Monongah Marion 

DeTurk, Eleanor _ ....Fairmont Marion 

Dobbie, Helen _ Fairmont Marion 

Gall, Elsie Fairmont Marion 

Gates, Eleanor Fairmont Marion 

Gates, Leona _ Fairmont Marion 

Harbison, Mary Elizabeth Mannington Marion 

Hartlieb, Josephine Fairmont Marion 

Hawkins, Adelaide Fairmont Marion 

Hughes, Mrs. Henrietta Fairmont Marion 

Jackson, Doris _ Fairmont Marion 

Jackson, Dorothy _ Fairmont Marion 

Jackson, Olin May .Fairmont Marion 

Jones, Evelyn Clarksburg -..Harrison 

McCarty, Edgar _ Fairmont Marion 

McCarty, Mary Lee _ Fairmont -Marion 

McCray, Jane -Mannington Marion 

Miller, Robert Fairview _ Marion 

Niland, Kathryn _ Grafton Taylor 

Prickett, Sarah Lee Fairmont Marion 

Reed, Jane _ Fairmont Marion 

Reed, June Fairmont Marion 

Reed, Pauline Fairmont Marion 

Riheldaffer, Mary Frances Fairmont Marion 

Ritchie, May | Franklin Pendleton .. 

Smith, Mary Elizabeth Fairmont Marion 

Stemple, Marion _ Fairmont Marion 

Trach, Pauline _ Fairmont Marion 

Waddell, Jean _ ..Fairmont Marion 

Yost, Jane Fairmont Marion 



VOICE STUDENTS 



Gump, John „ Mannington Marion 

O'Neal, Cleon _ Pullman Ritichie 

Pitzer, Dove _ _ „Fairview Marion 

Potter, Ruth Fairmont Marion 

Watson .Elinor ..., _ Fairmont Marion 



Fairmont State Normal School 141 

ENROLLMENT OF RESIDENCE STUDENTS 
BY COUNTIES 



Marion - 633 

Harrison - 173 

Taylor 78 

Preston - 71 

Wetzel _ 71 

Monongalia 53 

Marshall 41 

Braxton _ - 25 

Lewis 22 

Tucker - 20 

Wood _ 20 

Webster _ 15 

Barbour 13 

Hanock _ _ 13 

Randolph 10 

Tyler _ 10 

Jackson '. 9 

Nicholas 8 

Pocahontas 8 

Ritchie 7 

Doddridge _ 5 

Upshur _ 5 

Pendleton 5 

Mineral 4 

Greenbrier „ 4 

Wirt 4 

Roane 3 

Pleasants _ 3 

Grant 3 

Ohio _ 2 

Kanawha 2 

Jefferson _ 2 

Brooke 

Calhoun _ _ „ _ 

Fayette 

Gilmer _ 

Logan _ 

Mason 

McDowell _ 

Mercer 

Mingo _ 

Wyoming _ 



142 Fairmont State Normal School 

CORRESPONDENCE AND EXTENSION 
ENROLLMENT BY COUNTIES 



Harrison _ „ 87 

Wetzel 45 

Tucker 37 

Preston _ 35 

Marion ~ 29 

Berkeley _ _ 27 

Marshall _ 24 

Taylor _ 24 

Monongalia 23 

Wood _ _ 22 

Lewis 16 

Pleasants „ _ 15 

Tyler _ * 14 

Barbour _ _ _ 13 

Pocahontas „ 12 

Jackson _ _ 9 

Kanawha - <.,. 9 

Randolph _ — .. 9 

Wirt _ „ 7 

Hancock _ _ _ _ 5 

Webster _ 5 

Braxton _ 4 

Logan _ 4 

Mingo _ _ 4 

Nicholas _ _ 4 

Greenbrier 3 

Mason _ _ _ 3 

Putnam 3 

Boone 2 

Brooke _ 2 

Cabell _ _ _.... 2 

Calhoun 2 

Doddridge 2 

Ohio 2 

Upshur _ _ 2 

Gilmer «. _ 1 



Fairmont State Normal School 143 

Jefferson 

Hardy 

Lincoln 

Mercer 

Mineral 

Monroe _ 

Morgan _ 

Roane _ _ 

Summers _ 



BY STATES 

Kentucky _ _ 2 

Texas 2 

Maryland _ 1 

Ohio _ 1 

Pennsylvania _ 1 



144 



Fairmont State Normal School 



CORRESPONDENCE AND EXTENSION 
STUDENTS 



NAME 



POST OFFICE 



COUNTY 



Albright, Grace _ Bellaire, O _ 

Allen, Blanche _ New Martinsville Wetzel 

Allen, Clarice Cameron Marshall 

Allen, Luvina _ Hundred -Wetzel 

Alley, Florence Glen Dale Marshall 

Alhnan, Clarence B. ...„ Glen Easton -Marshall 

Anderson, A. H _ _ Folsom Wetzel 

Ankrom, Sue A New Martinsville 1 Wetzel 

Armstrong, Bryan Independence Taylor 

Ash, Cecil Ray ...._ _ Wilbur Tyler 

Ash, John W Wilbur Tyler 

Ault, Virginia E Grayson, Ky 

Auvil, H. W _ _ Parsons _ Tucker 

Baber, Nita Richwood Nicholas 

Backus, Goldie M Parkersburg Wood 

Baer, Mergie _ Morgantown Monongalia 

Bailey, Clay M Mt. Clare Harrison 

Bailey, Eva _ Weston -Lewis 

Ball, Clara _ Parsons Tucker 

Ball, Floyd M Parsons Tucker 1 

Barlow, Ruby _ Marlinton Pocahontas 

Bartlett, Christine Shinnston Harrison 

Bartley, Bernice E Middlebourne Tyler 

Beach, Ethel Weston Lewis 

Beckford _ Tunnelton — Preston 

Beckman, Jessie K _ Grafton -Taylor 

Beech, Mildred Mannington Marion 

Bennett, Ethel Webster Springs Webster 

Bennett, J. F _ _ Pierce Tucker 

Bennett, Thelma C Keyser _ Mineral 

Berger, G. R _ New Martinsville Wetzel 

Bethel, Georgie _ Sutton Braxton 

Bibbee, W. J Hanna - Wood 

Blake, Charles L Cameron - Marshall 

Bland, Mary E _ _ Clarksburg Harrison 

Bohrer, Curtis _ New Martinsville Wetzel 

Bolton, Ada Myrtle Belington - Barbour 

Bolyard, Beatrice Independence Preston 

Bond, Ruth Albright Preston 

Bonnell, Alta Smithfield ..— Wetzel 

Boore, Lelia _ _ Grant Town Marion 

Bradford, Madalyn Huntington Cabell 



Fairmont State Normal School 145 



NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY 

Bramlett, William Glenville Gilmer 

Brennen, Irene L -Clarksburg Harrison 

Briggs, Delia Morgantown Monongalia 

Bright, C. R St. Marys Pleasants 

Bright, Virginia _ Thomas Tucker 

Brown, Alma Morgantown Monongalia 

Brown, Dorothy Masontown Preston 

Brown, Hugh W Lumberport Harrison 

Brown, Ola M St. Marys Pleasants 

Bruce, Lottie B _ New Martinsville Wetzel 

Buck, F. A Middlebourne Tyler 

Bunner, Pauline Williamstown Wood 

Burley, Velma Thomas ...Tucker 

Buzzard, Ruth -Cameron Marshall 

Bird, Naomi _ Athens Mercer 

Call, Helen , —Cameron ...Marshall 

Campbell, Faye -Creston Wirt 

Campbell, George H Kasson Barbour 

Campbell, George W Kasson Barbour 

Cannon, Cora New Martinsville Wetzel 

Caplinger, Ena M — Elkins Randolph 

Carroll, Velma L 3rafton Taylor 

Carwell, Ruth V Belington Barbour 

Casto, Mabyn Clarksburg Harrison 

Caton, Ralph E _ Clifton Mills Preston 

Chambers, Alberta E _ _..Martinsburg Berkeley 

Chandler, Ruth _ Thomas Tucker 

Clemans, C. D Clarksburg Harrison 

Cline, William F Elizabeth Wirt 

Cochran, Jessie -Grafton Taylor 

Collins, Eva - Thomas Tucker 

Connell, May F Clarksburg Harrison 

Cooper, Sarah F Wellsburg Brooke 

Cotton, Lillian _..St. Marys Pleasants 

Cox, Clarence M -Blacksville Monongalia 

Cox, Margaret E Chester „ Hancock 

Craig, Mary L _ Buffalo Putnam 

Craig, Phern Richwood Nicholas 

Crist, Estes F _ Cass Pocahontas 

Crow, Thelma ..Cameron Marshall 

Cunningham, Linnie B Clarksburg Harrison 

Cunningham, Marjorie Clarksburg Harrison 

Cunningham, Opal New Haven Mason 

Curtis, Mrs. Cilway Clarksburg Harrison 

Daggett, L. V Parkersburg Wood 

Daniels, A. W _ _ Elkins Randolph 

Daugherty, Delbert -Newark Wirt 



146 Fairmont State Normal School 



NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY 

Davidson, Mildred E St. Marys Pleasants 

Davis, Clover M Clarksburg Harrison 

Davis, Mrs. J. H Clarksburg Harrison 

Deahl, Elizabeth Newburg _ Preston 

Deem, V. A Slate _ Wood 

DeHaven, Sula M Martinsburg Berkeley 

DeLancy, Thelma M Parkersburg Wood 

Dennewitz, Enda C _ Parkersburg Wood 

Dennison, Mary E Clarksburg Harrison 

Denton, Myrtle Clarksburg Harrison 

Dickinson, Virginia _ _ -Cheat Haven, Pa _ 

Doggett, Hilda Martinsburg Berkeley 

Dolin, Ira Lory Boone 

Dolin, Maudie Lory Boone 

Dorsey, Mary _ rhomas Tucker 

Duckwall, Margaret _ Berkeley Springs Morgan 

Dumire, Ethel Thomas Tucker 

Duncan, Adeline Wallace _ Harrison 

Duncan, J. Walter Clarksburg Harrison 

Dunn, Bonnie _ Charleston Kanawha 

Dye, Ellen - -Palestine Wirt 

Eckard, Horton -Point Pleasant ...Mason 

Eddy, Charles R. Core Monongalia 

Elder, Clemma I -Belington Barbour 

Elliott, Osa St. Marys Pleasants 

Elliott, Walter L - Srantsville Calhoun 

Emery, T. D - Cameron _ Marshall 

Erven, Merceline -....Nutter 1 Fort Harrison 

Ervin, Gladys E Morgantown _ Monongalia 

Ervine, Anna Lee _ Marlinton Pocahontas 

Evans, Harry _ Folsom Wetzel 

Fawcett, Glenna H Ringwood Preston 

Fawley, Mabel - Kingwood ...._ Preston 

Felton, Amy A Parsons —Tucker 

Felton, Mrs. Ferol Moatsville _ Barbour' 

Fish, Marjorie _ Moundsvile Marshall 

Fisher, Rhea H _ Grafton Taylor 

Fleming, Joseph H St. Marys Pleasants 

Fleming, Velma -Ravenswood Jackson 

Flint, Lila M St. Marys Pleasants 

Flowers, Eleanor Clarksburg Harrison 

Flowers, June _ _ Clarksburg Harrison 

Foggin, Margaret S _ Eatons -Wood 

Forman, Hattie E Grafton - Taylor 

Forsythe, Florence Davis Tucker 

Foster, Clyde C Ramp Summers 

Fox, Sarah F Morgantown -Monongalia 



Fairmont State Normal School 147 



NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY 

Francis, Gail _ Moundsville Marshall 

Franklyn, Mrs. Asee H Charleston Kanawha 

Frashuer, Latie Jane Lew Lewis 

Freed, Beulah Parkersburg Wood 

Freeland, W. A Folsom _ Wetzel 

Freeman, H. U Parsons Tucker 

Freeman, Mrs. H. U Parsons Tucker 

Froggart, Inez _ -Thomas Tucker 

Funk, Inez Tunnelton Preston 

Fuller, Ethel Mae Gill Lincoln 

Gall, Audra A „ _ Belington Barbour 

Gans Carrie A. ..._ _ _ Grafton Taylor 

Gaunt, Katie _ Belington -Barbour 

Gay, Virginia Edray Pocahontas 

George, Wilma Belington Barbour 

Gibbons, Teresa New Martinsville Wetzel 

Gibson, Wayne E Anmoore Harrison 

Gilbert, F. Fern _ Parkersburg Wood 

Gilger, Delia New Martinsville Wetzel 

Gillooly, Irene F _ Clarksburg — Harrison 

Goff, Greeta _ Weston -Lewis 

Goldsmtih, Francenia Clarksburg Harrison 

Gould, Martha J Buckhannon -Upshur 

Gould, Myrtle Buckhannon Upshur 

Gray, L. Eura Moundsville Marshall 

Gray, Paul S _ _ Smithfield Wetzel 

Gregory, Elsie J Webster Springs Webster 

Griffin, Alice R. Clarksburg Harrison 

Griffin, L. E _ Clarksburg Harrison 

Griffin, Opal Parkersburg Wood 

Griffith, Katherine -Farmington .Marion 

Griffith, M. Louise Gerrardstown Berkeley 

Guilmett, Anna _ Morgantown Monongalia 

Gump, Mildred Sine Fairview -Marion 

Hahn, Marie O _ Hambleton Tucker 

Hale, Florence _ Weston Lewis 

Hall, Beatrice _ Fairmont Marion 

Hall, Florence M Williamson Mingo 

Hall, Georgia _ Hoult Marion 

Hall, Violet Terra Alta Preston 

Halterman, Lona Mannington _ Marion 

Hamilton, Freda Hundred Wetzel 

Hamilton, Henry Adolph Randolph 

Hammer, Grace Flatwoods Braxton 

Hamon, Robert Fletcher Jackson 

Hannah, Ruby Slaty Fork Pocahontas 

Harker, Jane — Pentress _ Monongalia 



148 



Fairmont State Normal School 



NAME 



POST OFFICE 



COUNTY 



Harmer, Florence S _ Clarksburg Harrison 

Harmon, Geraldine Richwood Nicholas 

Hart, Mrs. C. M Clarksburg Harrison 

Hart, Pauline Clarksburg Harrison 

Hartman, Edwina Tunnelton ...Preston 

Haslebacher, Ona -Pickens Randolph 

Hawkins, Mrs. Helen Wheeling Ohio 

Hayman, Margaret Clarksburg Harrison 

Headley, Lester _ ...Fairview Marion 

Heckert, Constance Cinco Kanawha 

Heckert, Virginia A Horse Shoe Run Preston 

Heinselman, Mildred A Parkersburg Wood 

Heishman, Tirzah L Wardensville Hardy 

Henson, Sue E Bunker Hill Berkeley 

Hickman, Leonora D Parsons Tucker 

Higgins, Columbia R _ Littleton Wetzel 

Highland, Mrs. Virgil L Clarksburg Harrison 

Hill, Bernice J Renick Greenbrier 

Hill, Delia B Martinsburg Berkeley 

Hill, Elizabeth — Morgantown Monongalia 

Hill, F. H _ _ Middlebourne Tyler 

Himmelrick, Essie _ Burton Wetzel 

Himmelrick, Josephine Burton Wetzel 

Himmelrick Maude Burton Wetzel 

Hinkle, Ruth M _ Renick's Valley Greenbrier 

Hinkle, Virginia B Smithfield Wetzel 

Hockenberry, Violet ...._ ....Ripley Jackson 

Holden, George _ Clarksburg ...._ Harrison 

Hollida, Ethel Martinsburg _ Berkeley 

Hollida, Maude _ Martinsburg _ Berkeley 

Hood, Geraldine Ravenswood Jackson 

Horner, Mrs. Lynn L _ Clarksburg Harrison 

Horner, Mrs. B. Frank....- .Clarksburg Harrison 

Howard, Mary C Clarksburg .Harrison 

Huddy, Ruth Williamson Mingo 

Hudson, Ida H _ Morgantown Monongalia 

Huff, Gertrude Houston, Texas 

Huffman, W. B _ _ Parkersburg Wood 

Hughes, Fannie M _ Jane Lew Lewis 

Hull, J. T Weston _ Lewis 

Hutchinson, Grant Belington Barbour 

Hylbert, Christine H _ Parkersburg Wood 

Hunt, Garrett L .Burton Wetzel 

Ice, Dorothy — _ Enterprise Harrison 

Ingram, Mahala _ Eureka Pleasants 

Ingram, Mahala Chester Hancock 

Jaco, Mattie _ .Grafton Taylor 



Fairmont State Normal School 149 



NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY 

Jarvis, Mrs. Cecil Clarksburg Harrison 

Jemison, Erval _ _Middlebourne Tyler 

Jemison, Herman B Wrick Tyler 

Jenkins, Paul E Albright Preston 

John, Olive _ _ Chester „ Hancock 

Johnson, Adaline _.Mannington Marion 

Johnson, Ella Fairview Marion 

Johnson, E. R Parkersburg Wood 

Johnson, Lula M _ _ Union Monroe 

Johnson, Mrs. Louis A Clarksburg Harrison 

Johnson, Reeth Peach Creek Logan 

Judge, Belva G Pine Grove Wetzel 

Judge, Lucy _ Pine Grove Wetzel 

Karnes, Lillie ....Martinsburg ...Berkeley 

Keller, Ruth Ravenswood Jackson 

Kenney, Catherine Tunnelton Preston 

Kergan, Verna El Paso, Texas 

Kern, Isabelle G Fairmont Marion 

Kessell, Wade D _ Ripley _ Jackson 

Kettering, Gordie E Clarksburg Harrison 

Kidwell, Sara E _ Martinsburg Berkeley 

Kidwiler, J. C Martinsburg Berkeley 

Kilmer, Ruth K _ Martinsburg Berkeley 

King, Harry F „ _ Ethel -Logan 

Kirby, Inez Thomas Tucker 

Kirkland, Eliza J New Martinsville Wetzel 

Kite, Ruth Parsons Tucker 

Knykendall, Maude A Martinsburg Berkeley 

Koester, Lee A _ Cabin Creek Kanawha 

Koon, Wilma Watson Marion 

Laise, Katherine Bunker Hill Berkeley 

Lamp, Twila R _ St. Marys Pleasants 

Lancaster, Virginia -Marlinton Pocahonta* 

Lantz, Herbert C _ Farmington Marion 

Lantz, Mabel _ Davis Tucker 

Larew, Esther Newburg Preston 

Larimore, M. Virginia New Martinsville Wetzel 

Law, Clara B Crawford Lewis 

Lawrence, Majel _Clarksburg Harrison 

Lawson, Carl S _ Clarksburg Harrison 

Layman, Ellen Mae ..Fairmont Marion 

Leach, Emma H Grafton Taylor 

Lemley, Margaret V Burton Wetzel 

Leppert, Louise _ Ravenswood Jackson 

Levy, Alta R Moundsv/ille Marshall 

Limerick, Ida _ Thomas Tucker 

Linger, Mona L Weston Lewis 



160 



Fairmont State Normal School 



NAME 



POST OFFICE 



COUNTY 



Little, Beatrice Bridgeport Taylor 

Locke, Beatrice -Martinsburg Berkeley 

Locke, Grace St .Marys Pleasants 

Logsdon, M. DeWitt - Moundsville Marshall 

Loper, Mabel S Cameron Marshall 

Lough, Lena B Grafton Taylor 

Lowry, Bernice _ Cowen Webster 

Lynch, Sylva Morgantown Monongalia 

Lyons, Joseph, Jr Independence Preston 

Mace, Lula R Suncrest ..Randolph 

Mahle, Ruby Davis Tucker 

Marlow, Kathryne Parkersburg Wood 

Martin, Helen Enterprise Harrison 

Martin, Lelia B _ _ Elkins Randolph 

Martin, Mollie E _ Martinsburg Berkeley 

Martin, Virginia Albright Preston 

Mason, Bonnie E Terra Alta Preston 

Mason, M. Adah _ Martinsburg Berkeley 

Matthew, Grace _ Independence Taylor 

Maxwell, Mrs. W. M Clarksburg Harrison 

Mayhall, Ollie Moundsville -Marshall 

Mayhall, Virginia -Moundsville -Marshall 

McAndrew, Mary E _ Clarksburg Harrison 

McCardle, Amy _ Cameron Marshall 

McCarty, Doyle S Salem Harrison 

McCauley, Clair Elizabeth Wirt 

McClung, Una C Hurricane Putnam 

McCollam, Charles _ Mill Creek Randolph 

McGee, Clarence E _ Tunnelton Preston 

McHenry, Lulu B _ Parkersburg Wood 

McKinley, F. M Clarksburg Harrison 

McKinley, Mildred P Mt. Clare —...Harrison 

McMillan, Mrs. Lester -Clarksburg ..Harrison 

McNecol, Mrs. D. E. Jr Clarksburg Harrison 

McNicol, Mrs. John A ...Clarksburg Harrison 

McPherson, R. A _ Parkersburg Wood 

Metz, F. L Wallace Harrison 

Metz Minnie A Mannington Marion 

Michael, Cecil - Valley Point Preston 

Michael, Delia M _ _ Bruceton Mills Preston 

Milam, Otis H Barrackville Marion 

Milkint, Bessie -Thomas _ Tucker 

Miller, Anna M Elm Grove Ohio 

Miller, Gertrude H _ Kingwood Preston 

Miller, Grace Grafton Taylor 

Mtiller, Mildred J _ Blue Creek Kanawha 

Miller, Margaret E McMechen Marshall 



Fairmont State Normal School 



151 



NAME 



POST OFFICE 



COUNTY 



Miller, W. O _ Kingwood .. 

Minter, Ethel ...Clarksburg 

Moist, Mrs. Ronald Clarksburg 

Moore, Mahlon Fairview .... 

Morgan, Agnes L Clarksburg 

Morgan, Beulah W Clarksburg 

Morgan, Edna Cameron .... 

Moore, Beulah Huntersville 

Morris, Blanche _ Fairmont .... 



Preston 

Harrison 

Harrison 

Monongalia 

Harrison 

Harrison 

Marshall 

-Pocahontas 

Marion 

Morris, Ida Pearl St. Marys Pleasants 

Morris, Mrs. Robert Clarksburg Harrison 

Mramor, Marjorie Davis Tucker 

Mullen, Lille D Martinsburg Berkeley 

Murdock, Myrtle Kingwood Preston 

Murphy, Irene Morgantown Monongalia 

Musser, Junius K Clarksburg Harrison 

Myers, Mildred _ _New Martinsville Wetzel 

Newlon, Mrs. J. H Clarksburg Harrison 

Nuzum, Reanous -Bridgeport Taylor 

O'Brien, Helen M _ Martinsburg Berkeley 

O'Donnell, Elinor Clarksburg Harrison 

Offhaus, Ida ...Belington Barbour 

Ogden, Mary E Clarksburg ..Harrison 

O'Rohe, Elizabeth Martinsburg Berkeley 

Orr, Victoria H -Mallory .Logan 

Owens, Hattie Weston Lewis 

Palmer, Beulah -Minnehaha Springs.... Pocahontas 

Parsons, Virginia Proctor Wetzel 

Peterson, Sylvia _ Dellslow -Monongalia 

Petrella, Asunta Thomas Tucker 

Phillips, Inez Cameron -Marshall 

Phillips, Jay .Parsons Tucker 

Phillips, Leo A -Blacksville Monongalia 

Phipps, W. B Peach Creek Logan 

Plant, Elizabeth _ Hundred Wetzel 

Post, Geraldine B Morgantown Monongalia 

Powell, June M Haywood Harrison 

Powers, Luther Marlinton _ Pocahontas 

Pratt, Savannah Littleton Wetzel 

Prince, Minnie B Parkersburg Wood 

Pryan, Eula Cowen Webster 

Pyle, Ruth Clarksburg Harrison 

Queen, H. M _ _ Grafton Taylor 

Quigley, Elsie _ .Martinsburg Berkeley 

Quinnet, Yvonne Morgantown Monongalia 

Ramsey, Ethel Huntington Cabell 

Ransell, Eliaabeth Parkersburg Wood 



152 



Fairmont State Normal School 



name 



POST OFFICE 



COUNTY 



Ray, Myrtle _ Davis 

Rector, Mabel - - Oakland, Ky. 

Reddix, Virginia Clarksburg .. 

Renner, Ella - Hundred 

Renner, Nell Hundred 

Rexroad, Mary _ _ Kingwood .... 

Richardson, Bessie _ Kingwood .... 

Richardson, Edith Flatwoods .... 

Rider, P. M Rivesville 

Rider, Virginia Halltown 

Riggleman, Elva -Davis 

Riggs, Sylvia _ Grant Town 

Rightmire, Ella O Parsons 

Rinehart, Oleta Jane Lew .... 

Ripley, Chesleigh Alma 



.Tucker 

Harrison 
.Wetzel 

Wetzel 
.Preston 
.Preston 
.Braxton 
.Marion 

Jefferson 

Tucker 
.Marion 

Tucker 

Lewis 
.Tyler 



Rist, Roberta New Martinsville Wetzel 

Roberts, Edna _ Mannington Marion 

Roberts, Melvin Belington —Barbour 

Roberts, Odgar Burton Wetzel 

Robey, Emma J „ ..Mannington Marion 

Robey, Mabel G Lumberport Harrison 

Robinson, Beryle Hastings Wetzel 

Robinson, Hazel _Kingwood Preston 

Rogers, Marie Jane Lew — Lewis 

Rohrbough, Myrl _ Weston Lewis 

Romine, Virginia A ;....Clarksburg Harrison 

Ropp, Margaret E. ... Hedgesville Berkeley 

Rose, Marian Middlebourne Tyler 

Rowe, Elizabeth Camden-on-Gauley ...Webster 

Rowland, Edward Weirton ...Hancock 

Rowley, Mabel LaVille Kanawha 

Rush, Ada F - Hundred Wetzel 

Rush, W. E Glover Gap Marion 

Rushford, Charlotte _ New Martinsville Wetzel 

Rusimille, S. Edgar Cass Pocahontas 

Schilansky, Bess — Thomas _ Tucker 

Schilansky, Lilia Thomas _ Tucker 

Schofield, Clara J Marlinton Pocahontas 

Schroder, Clara Moundsville Marshall 

Scott, Jean S _ _ Fairmont Marion 

Scott, Nellie Smithfield Wetzel 

Seese, Virginia Moundsville ..Marshall 

Sewell, Marguerite Clarksburg Harrison 

Shackleford, Alma Clarksburg Harrison 

Shade, Zella I _ _ Martinsburg Berkeley 

Shafer, Ethel Kingwood Preston 

Shaffer, Florence _ Grafton _ Taylor 



Fairmont State Normal School 153 



NAME POST OFFICE COUNTY 

Shaffer, W. Elmer Morgantown Monongalia 

Shaver, Freda B Brown Harrison 

Shaver, Mary E _ Richwood Nicholas 

Shaver, Virginia _ Parkersburg ..Wood 

Shawhan, Hugh Hepzibah Harrison 

Shawver, Ruby E New Haven —Mason 

Sherman, Nannie B Reid's Grove, Md _ 

Shetter, Mrs. Fred _ Clarksburg Harrison 

Shomo, Stark _ ...Belington Barbour 

Shotkus, Tackley Thomas Tucker 

Showers, Josina T Martinsburg Berkeley 

Shuman, William A „ Blacksville Monongalia 

Skeen, H. B _ Fletcher „ Jackson 

Sleeth, H. Fonda _ Weston Lewis 

Smith, Ara T Parsons _ Tucker 

Smith, D. Glenn Frew _ Tyler 

Smith, Ezra _ Fletcher Jackson 

Smith, Frank _ _Nutter Fork .Harrison 

Smith, Glen L Middlebourne ...Tyler 

Smith, Helen M Martinsburg Berkeley 

Smith, Jessie B Martinsburg Berkeley 

Smith, Kathleen Williamson Mingo 

Smith, Minnie _ rhomas -Tucker 

Smith, Mrs. S. A Clarksburg ..Harrison 

Smith, Vivian Williamson Mingo 

Snedegar, Delpha _Marlinton Pocahontas 

Snyder, Agnes P _ St. Marys Pleasants 

Snyder, Edna B _ Elizabeth Wirt 

Southern, Mary K Nutter Fork Harrison 

Staats, Harry A _ Belleville Wood 

Stackpole, W. A _Pine Grove Wetzel 

Stadler, Louise -Helvetia _ Rondalph 

Stalnaker, W. O Quinwood Lewis 

Steele, Alta — „ Blacksville Monongalia 

Steptoe, Mrs. Philip Clarksburg Harrison 

Stone, Orville R _ Liberty - Putnam 

Stover, Jackson ...Decota - Kanawha 

Straight, Ada _ Lumberport Harrison 

Straight, H. B _ Fairview Marion 

Strickling, Isabel St. Marys Pleasants 

Strickling, Nellie Wellsburg Brooke 

Stroueburg, Florence D McMechen Marshall 

Stuart, Lola B Julia Greenbrier 

Suder, Margaret ...._ Thomas Tucker 

Sutter, Mrs. Lewis M -Clarksburg Harrison 

Sypolt, William T _ Albright Preston 

Talkington, Mae Hundred Wetzel 



154 



Fairmont State Normal School 



NAME 



POST OFFICE 



COUNTY 

..Marion 
..Wetzel 
..Randolph 
..Harrison 
..Monongalia 
-Marion 
..Tucker 
-Harrison 
■Harrison 



Talkington, Mildred Mannington .... 

Talkington, Sadie - Hundred 

Taylor, Odin _ -Elkins — 

Templeman, Mrs. E. B Clarksburg 

Tennant, Stella r Mooresville 

Tennant, Wayne _ Fairview 

Teter, Mrs. D. B _ Thomas 

Teter, M. D —Bridgeport 

Thrasher, Thelma Wilsonburg 

Thomas, C. Arthur Bruceton Mills Preston 

Todd, Mabel M - -Clarksburg Harrison 

Toyer, F. A -...Thomas Tucker 

Triplett, Alfaretta St. Marys Pleasants 

Tucker, Lyda M Newell Hancock 

Tucker, Margaret J Clarksburg Harrison 

Twyman, Lillian M -Middlebourne Tyler 

Underwood, Emma — Elizabeth Wirt 

Van Camp, Geraldine Paden City Wetzel 

Van Cooney, Lena Paden City Wetzel 

Van Metre, Lillian Martinsburg Berkeley 

Vanscoy, Beura Miletus Doddridge 

Veon, Emma Waverly Pleasants 

Waldo, Truslow S Grantsville -Calhoun 

Wallace, Helen _ West Union Doddridge 

Walls, Howard Independence Preston 

Walls, Ruth _ -Pisgah -Preston 

Walls, Waunita Independence Preston 

Walter, Lena M _ Thornton Taylor 

Warden, Ina M _ Grafton Taylor 

Watson, Clarice Middlebourne Tyler 

Waugh, L. H _ Clarksburg Harrison 

Weaver, Mary Fairview Marion 

Wentz, Herbert -Spencer Roane 

West, Mrs. Olandus Clarksburg Harrison 

West, Phyllis _ Roanoke Lewis 

Wharton, Charles _ Frew Tyler 

Whelan, Alice _ ...Clarksburg Harrison 

White, Florence H _ Grafton ...._ Taylor 

White, Grace Grafton Taylor 

Wilfong, Edna „ Decota Kanawha 

Wilhelm, Marie Watson Marion 

Wilkins, Inez _ Independence Preston 

Wilkinson, Cordie _ Shinnston Harrison 

Wilkinson, Florence H Grafton Taylor 

Willey, C. E Pine Grove Wetzel 

Williams, Ethel B _ Grafton ...._ Taylor 

Williams, Glenna -Gassaway Braxton 



Fairmont State Normal School 155 



NAME POST, OFFICE COUNTY 

Wilson, G. H _ Kingwood ..Preston 

Wilson, Jennie C -..Clarksburg Harrison 

Wilson, Mrs. Mark D Clarksburg Harrison 

Wilson, Ruth St. Albans Kanawha 

Wilson, W. A _ _ Fairmont Marion 

Wycoff, Zeppa Fairmont Marion 

Yates, Farrel _ Grafton Taylor 

Yoak, Maud Clarksburg Harrison 

Young, Catherine _New Martinsville Wetzel 

Young, Geneva ._Moundsville Marshall 

Zinn, Hazel M Grafton Taylor 



156 Fairmont State Normal School 



SUMMARY OF ENROLLMENT FOR 1926-1927 



Men Women Total 

Special Students 5 

College Seniors _ 47 

College Juniors _ 45 

College Sophomores _ 47 

College Freshman 71 

Standard Normal Seniors _ 26 

Standard Normal Juniors 72 

Music Students 5 

Total 318 

Counted Twice 4 

Different Residence Students 314 

Extension Students _ 108 

Total 422 

Counted Twice 19 

Different Students Enrolled 403 1349 1752 



6 


11 


59 


106 


134 


179 


40 


87 


54 


125 


319 


345 


397 


469 


37 


42 


1046 


1364 


12 


16 


1034 


1348 


415 


523 


1449 


1871 


100 


119 






5£?H RUZICKA 
OKBINOERS